From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

National Positive Practice in Mental Health Awards 2018

Tonight The Tomorrow Project attended the National Positive Practice in Mental Health Awards 2018 in Liverpool! This is an absolutely humbling experience to see and meet so many amazing practitioners and academics in the field of mental health. It’s really wonderful to be in a (beautiful) room with this many people passionate about supporting those struggling with mental health, and indeed, suicide crisis and suicide bereavement. 


Really proud to say The Tomorrow Project received a highly commended award for the services we provide to those struggling with suicide crisis/bereavement and self-harm; truly a pleasure to be here to receive this. 


Here’s to another year of positive practice in mental health 🤗

NTU well-being stand

Today our team hosted a stand for Nottingham Trent University’s wellbeing fair.

‘It was a great day with lots of interaction from staff and students. Lots of conversations around mental health and breaking down those stigmas associated and best of all we got to meet Jimmy NTU’s therapy dog!!!’ – Our Harmless team

The Tomorrow Project at the National Positive Practice in Mental Health Awards tonight!

Presented by the Positive Practice in Mental Health Collaborative, The Tomorrow Project are shortlisted for the Suicide Prevention Services/Initiatives Award. Words cannot express how proud we feel as a team to be shortlisted for this award. Our colleagues Claire and Bevan will be at the ceremony in Liverpool tonight where hopefully the Tomorrow Project can come away as winners!

Young people and mental health in a changing world

World Mental Health Day is on 10th October 2018. This year’s focus is on young people and mental health in a changing world.

Research tells us that mental health related problems often begin in childhood and continue to affect those struggling throughout their life.

Good mental health really does begin in infancy.

You might have heard people talk about ‘mental health being equal to physical health’ and we couldn’t agree more. Mental health is central to everyone’s well-being, this includes, children, adolescents, young adults, adults and older people.

With the focus this year on young people we wanted to begin by noting some key statistics:

  • 20% of adolescents may experience a mental health problem in any given year.

There are around 11.7 million adolescents in the UK so this percentage means that over 2.5 million adolescents are affected.

  • 50% of mental health problems are established by the age of 14 and 75% by the age of 24. That’s nearly ¾ of our young people affected.
  • 10% of children and young people (aged 5-16 years) have a clinically diagnosable mental health problem, yet 70% of children and adolescence who experience mental health problems have not had appropriate interventions at a sufficiently early age.

I think we can all agree that these statistics are alarming; particularly that 70% of children haven’t received support. It’s no wonder why so many adults are struggling.  The emotional wellbeing of children is just as important as their physical health. Good mental health allows children and young people to develop the resilience to cope with life’s adversities and grow into well-rounded, healthy adults who thrive.

What can we do to support our young people?

  • Good physical health is imperative to good mental health, the two support each other. This includes eating a balanced diet and regular exercise.
  • Having time to just be young people. To explore, to learn and discover. The freedom to play is crucial for their development on multiple levels.
  • Being part of a network. This could be interpreted as a family, a team, a club, a close group of friends. It’s the connection and support network that is essential to thriving and growing developmentally.
  • Taking part in activities that support young people.
  • Teaching young people about healthy living, healthy minds and healthy relationships.

Additional factors which are also important for young people:

  • Feeling loved, valued, safe and understood.
  • Hopefulness
  • Optimism
  • Being given opportunities to learn
  • Learning about and accepting who they are and recognizing their strengths
  • Having a sense of belonging (this feeds into the need for a network and that connection).
  • Resilience
  • Knowing who to turn to when they can’t manage

There are many factors that can put a child or a young person at a greater risk of developing a mental health problem, and some of these include:

  • Having a long-term physical illness
  • Having a parent who has had mental health problems, problems with alcohol or has been in trouble with the law
  • Experiencing the death of someone close to them
  • Having parents who separate or divorce
  • Having been severely bullied or physically or sexually abused
  • Living in poverty or being homeless
  • Experiencing discrimination, perhaps because of their race, sexuality or religion
  • Acting as a carer for a relative, taking on adult responsibilities
  • Having long-standing educational difficulties.

Common mental health problems for children and young people may include: depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders.

Whilst this is might feel alarming, there is a lot of support available out there. If we were all to take equal responsibility for the children around us it would go a long way.

Being someone who a young person can talk to, is key to supporting them. Being a young person is a difficult and a challenging time with many hurdles… And that’s without mentioning the mix of hormones around the body when reaching puberty. The most helpful thing that adults can do to help is, to listen and take the young person’s feelings seriously. Validation and acceptance that not feeling ok, is ok. They may just want a hug or need practical help, whatever they need, the best way to find out is to listen.

Remind children that it’s ok to feel like this, no one feels happy all the time.

The ‘negative’ feelings will usually pass. Take this time to note them, to explore them, and to talk about them. What might that be? What might it be from? It’s a difficult feeling but it will get better.

It’s a good idea to get help if a child is distressed for a long time. Particularly, if their perceived negative feelings are stopping them from getting on with their lives, if their distress is disrupting their family life, or if they are repeatedly behaving in ways that you would not expect them to at their age.

Here is a list organisations who can support a child or young person should they need professional help:

Harmless
The Tomorrow Project
ChildLine
Young Minds
Family Lives
Bernardo’s
Kidscape
CALM (Campaign Against Living Miserably)
PAPYRUS (Prevention of Young Suicide)
Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition (CYPMHC)
CAMHS

Ultimately, good mental health begins in infancy and if we all came together in supporting the young people in society we would make a huge impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the News: 16-24 Year Olds Most Likely To Be Lonely, New BBC Study Finds

Young people feel lonely more often and more intensely than any other age group, one of the biggest studies into the issue has found.

Some 40% of respondents aged between 16 and 24 years old said they experience loneliness often or very often, compared with just 29% of those aged between 65 and 74.

The figures are revealed on Monday with the publication of a survey of over 55,000 people exploring the issue of loneliness.

The study, developed by academics and published by BBC Radio 4, found people who feel lonely have more Facebook friends, suggesting social media could be a factor in loneliness.

Matt Blow, of the charity Young Minds, told HuffPost UK: “Living much of your life on social media also means that you can be extremely well connected, but still feel lonely, especially if you can’t relate to the apparently ‘perfect’ lives that other people are presenting.

“Feeling lonely isn’t itself a mental health problem, but it can have a negative impact on your mental health, especially if the loneliness lasts a long time.

“Young people who are struggling with their mental health also often feel isolated or alone.”

The study, dubbed the BBC Loneliness Experiment, found that those who are lonely thought that dating is the least helpful solution suggested by others.

And just a third thought loneliness meant being alone physically.

Some 41% of those surveyed said they thought loneliness could sometimes be a positive experience.

Of the findings, Claudia Hammond, presenter of Radio 4’s ‘All in the Mind’, which will broadcast a series of special programmes on the issue, said: “The topic of loneliness is now receiving a great deal of attention and political prominence as demonstrated by its inclusion in Tracey Crouch’s ministerial portfolio and the recommendations from The Jo Cox Loneliness Commission.

“We were staggered by the huge numbers of people taking part in our survey.

“This research shows we need to take loneliness seriously in all age groups.

“We know that most loneliness is temporary, but we need to find ways to prevent it from becoming chronic.”

Pamela Qualter, Professor of Psychology at the University of Manchester, who led the study, said: “The response to the BBC Loneliness Experiment has been significant.

“People have provided valuable insights into when and how loneliness is experienced, how it relates to age, being alone, caring responsibilities, employability, and discrimination.

“For me, the most interesting findings relate to the stigma of loneliness and the varied solutions people had to overcome loneliness.

“Those findings suggest that we need to be kinder to ourselves when we feel disconnected from others, but also that there is a whole toolkit of potential solutions that we can try.”

If you or someone you know needs support we will be there for you. info@harmless.org.uk, 01158800280 or contact us via facebook.

Link to original blog: https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/loneliness-study-bbc_uk_5bae4e12e4b0b4d308d29dd4?ncid=other_topnaventr_coabgdcpxri&utm_campaign=topnav&guccounter=1&guce_referrer_us=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZmFjZWJvb2suY29tLw&guce_referrer_cs=bcEj9qh_VtoKPOUjZ6vIRg

In the News: Instagram mental health campaign targets freshers

Two mental health charities have launched a campaign on Instagram aimed at supporting the emotional wellbeing of University freshers.

The Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM), which supports men at risk of suicide, and The Mix, a crisis support charity for young people, have created an Instagram zine to help those starting university feel more emotionally secure.

Last year The Mix saw a 160% increase in people asking for help about university in the period after their freshers week.

The zine includes features from celebrities includes singer-songwriter Lucy Spraggan, as well as social media influencers such as Grace Beverley, Ashleigh Ponder and Jack Edwards.

Spraggan will be encouraging students to embrace new university experiences, while food blogger Ponder will be giving helpful cooking tips for students.

This latest zine sits on the Instagram accounts of CALM and The Mix and is the second of the charities’ five part #Gramfam Instagram series, which focuses on mental health flashpoints in the academic year. The first looked at handling stress when exam results are published and a third is due for release in December.

GramFam stands for Instagram Family and has been developed to help students and young people feel like they are not alone regarding mental health issues.

Freshers are vulnerable to mental health problems

“Leaving home for the first time and getting to grips with new surroundings and people, coupled with the hectic and often hedonistic Freshers Week, can be hard to navigate,” said CALM Chief Executive Officer Simon Gunning.

“That’s why we’ve worked with Instagram and The Mix to bring together a host of familiar faces to share messages of support for young people during what should be a positive and exciting time in their lives.”

Chris Martin, The Mix Chief Executive Officer, added: “Going to uni is an amazing opportunity to learn, meet new friends and step into independent life but last year we saw a big increase in the number of students visiting The Mix who had struggled to find their feet in their first weeks.

“With this latest issue of #GramFam, we want to make sure all students have access to all the advice and support they need before they start their courses. We’re really excited to be working with CALM and Instagram to bring the #GramFam family together again to promote good mental health and a great start for everyone beginning student life.”

Link to original blog: https://www.charitydigitalnews.co.uk/2018/09/28/instagram-mental-health-campaign-targets-freshers/

In the News: Four in 10 hide poor mental health when calling in sick

A quarter of staff worried they would not be taken seriously if they told their employer they were suffering from poor mental health, a survey of 1,001 UK employees by health and wellbeing provider BHSF discovered.

Almost two-thirds felt their colleagues had negative perceptions of mental health issues, while 88% of those with a mental health issue said their job was either the main cause or a contributing factor in the way they were feeling.

BHSF calculated that the average employee takes 8.4 days off sick every year because of their mental health – potentially resulting in huge economic costs. Yet only 15% of employees said they would tell their boss about it.

Fifty-six per cent of those polled said they suffered from stress; 36% had anxiety and 25% had depression.

According to the Mental Health Foundation, long-term physical health conditions and mental health issues are inextricably linked: around 15 million people have a long-term health condition, four million of whom also experience poor mental health.

Separate research by charity Crohn’s & Colitis UK earlier this year revealed that four in 10 people with a recurring health condition felt anxious when calling in sick, while 28% experienced stress.

“The scale of this problem is huge – and it is being massively underestimated by employers, with employees feeling that they have to mask the issues they are facing,” said Dr Philip McCrea, chief medical officer at BHSF.

“Mental health problems do not suddenly materialise. The vast majority of individuals suffering from poor mental health will show obvious signs, which are easy to spot in the workplace. Line managers, or nominated individuals, should be trained to spot the first signs.

“For employers, developing early intervention strategies is critical – this includes the provision of mental health first-aiders, providing adequate mental health training for managers, and resilience building for employees, amongst other things.”

The survey results form part of BHSF’s report – Hiding in plain sight: mental health in the workplace – which suggests ways employers can tackle mental health problems and create a “mentally healthy” workplace.

It provides nine steps HR and managers can take to encourage positive mental health:

  • leading from the top by setting the tone that mental health should not be perceived negatively;
  • identifying the scale of the problem by conducting a survey of the staff;
  • creating an open environment where employees can come forward about any problems;
  • training line managers to spot the signs of poor mental health;
  • practicing early intervention;
  • training mental health first aiders;
  • providing an employee assistance programme;
  • engaging an occupational health professional to assist; and
  • educating employees about the benefits of exercise, healthy eating and sleep.

Link to original blog: https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/hiding-poor-mental-health-when-calling-in-sick/