Harmless to launch a new training programme for 2014 around self harm and mental health

Harmless are launching a range of new training packages around self harm and mental health. As a specialist service and leading organisation in the field; Harmless and our team will draw on its own expertise, knowledge and experience to deliver training that increases awareness and/or enhances the knowledge and skills to supporting those who face mental health problems and a range of other challenges.

All training will be held in our new training facility located at the Nottingham Voluntary Action Centre, Mansfield Road, Nottingham. NG1 3FB. (4th Floor)

For more information please visit http://www.harmless.org.uk/professionals/training or to make a booking email training@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only).

Harmless training programme for 2014:

Introduction to Self Harm and working with self harm

Type: Full Days Training

Date: Thursday 16th January 2014

Time: 9.30am until 4pm

Cost: £110 per person (10% discount for charities and those booking 5 or more places)

Details: This training day gives delegates from a broad range of professional arenas an opportunity to get a detailed overview from the experts about self harm and working with self harm. Although this training is not specific to any profession, it will aim to enhance understanding and skills to be able to make a positive difference to the life of someone who is self harming, and to looks to ensure that we feel more comfortable and confident about working with people who self harm.

Learning Outcomes:

  • What self harm is, and who it effects
  • What causes someone to self harm and some of the myths around self harm
  • What can be done to support and help people who self harm
  • Managing the impact of self harm as an individual and a workplace
  • Useful interventions for working with people who self harm and promoting empowerment
  • Managing and assessing risk

Mental Health Awareness Training

Type: Full Day Training

Date: Thursday 20th February 2014

Time: 9.30am until 4pm

Price: £110.00 per person (10% discount for charities and those booking 5 or more places)

Details:  As a specialist service and leading organisation in the field of self harm and mental health, Harmless have vast experience in supporting people with additional complex needs. This training will draw on that experience and knowledge and will explore mental health and working with those with mental health problems.

Learning Outcomes: Available soon

‘I hurt too!’ – Working with people who experience learning difficulties and self harm

Type: Workshop

Date: Tuesday 25th February 2014

Time: 9.30am until 1pm

Price: £60.00 per person

Details:  As a specialist service and leading organisation in the field of self harm, Harmless have vast experience in supporting people with additional complex needs. This workshop with draw on that experience and knowledge and will explore the additional complexity of working with learning disabilities and self harm.

Learning outcomes:

  • Developing an understanding of self harm in context
  • An exploration of the motivation and drive for self harm in context,
  • Exploring the additional complexity of working with self harm in learning disability clients
  • Developing strategies and improving communication for working with people with learning disabilities, that self harm.
  • Considering service, structural or policy implications of working with complex needs in the presence of self harm

Self Harm and Young People

Type: Full Day’s Training

Date: Thursday 27th February 2014

Time: 9.30am until 4pm

Price: £110.00 (10% discounts for charities and those booking 5 or more places)

This training concentrates on self harm from the perspective of young people. Harmless are a specialist service and leading organisation in the field of self harm and have years of experience of working with those aged under 18 years old. This training day gives delegates from a broad range of professional arenas an opportunity to get a detailed overview from the experts about self harm and working with young people who self harm.

This training would be suitable for anyone who works with young people or who may come in to contract with young people who self harm or at risk of self harm.

Learning Outcomes

  • What self harm is, and who it effects
  • What causes young people to self harm and some of the myths around self harm
  • What can be done to support and help young people who self harm
  • Managing the impact of self harm as an individual and a workplace
  • Useful interventions for working with young people who self harm and promoting empowerment
  • Managing and assessing risk

Cyber-Bullying: The new challenge facing the next generation – How can we preserve the emotional wellbeing and mental health of our future?

Type: Workshop

Date: Thursday 13th March 2014

Time: 9.30am until 1pm

Cost: £60 per person

Our training aims to raise awareness and understanding of the issues facing the next generation. It will explore cyber-bullying from the perspective of a young person and the potential dangerous consequences that social media can have on those who access it. The growing use of apps and smart phones now mean most young people have instant access to the internet and social sites 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Do we really know what our children are accessing online and the potential risks involved?

Learning outcomes:

  • We will look at a number of popular social media sites and how they work and the potential risks involved
  • Explore dangers such as online bullying and the links to suicide and self harm
  • Discussion on the importance placed by young people on online ‘life’
  • Highlight the dangers of anonymity
  • There will also be some opportunity to explore other issues around cyber-bullying and ask questions

Being Gay: Not all rainbows and unicorns – The impact of sexuality on our mental health

Type: Workshop

Date: Wednesday 19th March 2014

Times: 9.30am until 1pm

Price: £60 pp

Although it is fair to say we are taking positives steps forward as a nation, there are still many challenges which face the LGBT community.  Our workshop will aim to increase awareness and understanding about the issues faced and to develop skills to make a positive difference in the future.

Learning outcomes:

  • We will look to define LGBT from all perspectives – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender.
  • Discuss the challenges and difficulties faced by LGBT people when ‘coming out’ from the perspective of both young people and adults.
  • We will explore bullying with particular focus on homophobic language and the use of homophobic language in the modern day – are some terms still accepted and not seen as serious?
  • Relationship issues such as domestic violence and abuse
  • There will also be some opportunity to discuss other issues and ask questions

 

Self harm drop in tomorrow for adults (18+)

Tomorrow (8th January), Harmless will host a self harm drop in session for adults aged 18 and over from 14:30 – 15:30 at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service.

If you are 18 or over, and would like support for yourself,  a friend or family member then feel free to come along. Our trained therapists will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

Location:
All drop ins will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB

If you would like further information please email info@harmless.org.uk
For those who can’t make it tomorrow or would like to join us at our young person’s drop in instead, then please see below for future drop in dates:
  • Wednesday 5th February 14:30-15:30 – Young Person’s drop in (Ages 11-21)
  • Wednesday 5th March 14:30-15:30 – Adult drop in (Ages 18+)
  • Wednesday 2nd April 14:30-15:30 – Young Person’s drop in (Ages 11-21)

Mental health nurses are to be based in police stations and courts

Mental health nurses are to be based in police stations and courts in 10 areas of England as part of a pilot scheme aimed at cutting reoffending.

The nurses’ duties will include helping officers to respond to calls and identify those with problems.

Ministers said “too often” criminals with mental health problems were being diagnosed only once they reached jail.

The £25m scheme – being trialled in areas including London and Merseyside – could be extended England-wide by 2017.

Support and treatment

The Department of Health says most people in prison have a mental health problem, a substance misuse problem or a learning disability, and one in four has a severe mental health illness such as depression or psychosis.

It has been estimated that police officers spend 15% to 25% of their time dealing with suspects with mental health problems.

Being diagnosed with a mental health, learning difficulty or substance abuse problem will mean people can be offered treatment or support, and could affect how they are dealt with by the criminal justice system, ministers say.

The pilot mental health “liaison and diversion” teams will run in:

Merseyside
London
Avon and Wiltshire
Leicester
Sussex
Dorset
Sunderland and Middlesbrough
Coventry
South Essex
Wakefield
Similar arrangements have already been successfully tried in Leicestershire and Cleveland.

Health minister Norman Lamb told BBC News: “There are so many people in our prisons with mental health problems which haven’t been diagnosed and yet, if we diagnose them and deal with them, we can reduce reoffending.

“It just makes so much sense from everyone’s point of view.”

Policing minister Damian Green added: “Police officers should be focused on fighting crimes and people with mental health conditions should get the care they need as early as possible.

“These pilots will not only ensure that happens but, in the longer term, will help drive down reoffending by individuals who, with the right kind of treatment, can recover fully.”

Vital skills

Paul Jenkins, chief executive of the charity Rethink Mental Illness, said: “All too often, the way our criminal justice system deals with people with mental health problems leads to poor outcomes for individuals, frustration from police officers, magistrates and others, and such a waste of resources as people are needlessly sent to prison through a failure to respond to some of the underlying issues in their lives.

“We welcome this initiative, which has the potential to stop people going unnecessarily to prison, reduce reoffending rates and save millions in taxpayers’ money.

“This scheme may not be a panacea, but these liaison and diversion teams are definitely the best opportunity we’ve had to do things differently.”

Dr Peter Carter, general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said the organisation had been involved in developing the scheme alongside the government.

He added: “Nurses bring vital skills and knowledge to these complex and challenging cases and we know that the police greatly value working in partnership with nursing staff.

“Having more nurses in liaison and diversion services will improve the health care that people in the criminal justice system receive and it will also support the police’s public protection work.”

Are services changing in the field of self harm?

A study led by Dr Jayne Cooper reported that hospital management of patients who self-harm has barely changed in the past 10 years despite the introduction of clinical guidelines. The investigation of 32 hospitals in England found that only 58% of people received a psychosocial assessment following self-harm, varying from 22-88% between hospitals. The article, ‘Are hospital services for self-harm getting better? An observational study examining management, service provision and temporal trends in England’

The full article can be accessed here

Fundraising for Suicide Prevention Services…

Please Help Hollie reach her fundraising target of £250.

In May 2015, Hollie will be will be running the Lichfield Half Marathon, on Sunday 3rd May 2015 to raise money for the Tomorrow Project, East Leake.

The Tomorrow project was set up in response to a local community in East Leake and needs great fundraising efforts like this one to continue delivering vital support and suicide prevention services as it currently receives no statutory funding.

You can help Hollie by making a donation via local giving here: http://m.localgiving.com/fundraising/hollielouisesmith

The Tomorrow Project thanks you for your support. www.tomorrowproject.org.uk

How the Internet effects young people at risk of self harm or suicide.

Oxford researchers have found that internet forums provide a support network for socially isolated young people. However, they also conclude that the internet is linked to an increased risk of suicide and self-harm among vulnerable adolescents

Oxford researchers have found internet forums provide a support network for socially isolated young people. However, they also conclude that the internet is linked to an increased risk of suicide and self-harm among vulnerable adolescents. Following what is thought to be the biggest review of existing studies into internet use and young people, the researchers suggest that in future, clinical assessments of such young people should include questions about the online content they have viewed.

The global review, published in the journal PLOS ONE, shows that young people at risk of self-harm or suicide were often online for longer periods than other teenagers. The Oxford team analysed a total of 14 studies and found contradictory findings on whether the internet exerted a positive or negative influence. Some studies found that internet forums supported and connect socially isolated people, helping them to cope. But other studies concluded that young people who went online to find out more about self-harm and suicide were exposed to violent imagery and acted out what they had seen online. The review finds that internet use is linked with more violent methods of self-harm.

Moderate or severe addiction to the internet is also connected to an increased risk for self-harm, and increased levels of depression or thoughts about suicide, says the Oxford review. The review also says there is a strong link between young people using internet forums and an increased risk of suicide– a connection not found in relation to other social network sites.

In one of the studies reviewed, well over half (59%) of young people interviewed said they had researched suicide online. Meanwhile, of 15 teenagers who had carried out particularly violent acts of self-harm, 80% said they had gone online to research self-harm beforehand. Of 34 who self-harmed by cutting, 73% said they had researched it online.

Young people who used the forums stressed the value of anonymity. One of the studies reviewed suggested that young people using the forums appeared to normalise self-harm. Most users went to the forums for empathy or to discuss safety issues rather than talk about how they could reduce their self-harming behaviour. Another study showed that out of nearly 300 posts, 9% were about methods of self-harm and users went to the forums to swap tips on how to hide the problem.

Internet forums did not make the users feel any better, and in some cases they showed signs of increasing distress after using the sites, said one study. However, another study contradicts this, saying that an analysis of the posts created by forum users reveals that by the third month they were less distressed than they had been in the first couple of months. Young people who went to the forums said positive behaviour was encouraged: they congratulated each other for not cutting or urged one another to seek help from GPs. Despite this, the review says that overall although forums may have provided emotional support, there is no evidence to suggest that this translated into young people actually reducing levels of self-harm. There was no consensus among users as to whether forums altered this behaviour.

The review also highlights the risk of cyber-bullying to vulnerable young people. Online bullying was found to make victims more likely to self-harm. One study suggested that it slightly increased rates of attempted suicide by the victim as well as the perpetrator. Email was used in 18% of cases of cyber-bullying, followed by instant messaging (16%), MySpace (14%) and chat rooms (10%), says the review.

Senior author Professor Paul Montgomery, from the Centre for Evidence Based Intervention at the University of Oxford, said: ‘We are not saying that all young people who go on the internet increase their risk of suicide or self-harm. We are talking about vulnerable young people who are going online specifically to find out more about harming themselves or because they are considering suicide already. The question is whether the online content triggers a response so that they self-harm or take their own lives and we have found that there is a link.’

Lead author Kate Daine, a postgraduate researcher from the Centre for Evidence Based Intervention, said: ‘There are no known online interventions to date that specifically target young people at risk of self-harm or suicide and yet we find that adolescents who self-harm are very frequent users of the internet. While social media might be useful for supporting vulnerable adolescents, we also find that the internet is doing more harm than good in some cases. We need to know more about how we can use social media as a channel to help young people in distress.’

Responding to the review, Joe Ferns, Executive Director of Policy at Samaritans, said: ‘We should acknowledge that many people are using suicide forums and chat rooms to anonymously discuss their feelings of distress and despair, including suicidal thoughts, which may have a positive impact on the individual. They may be expressing feelings that they have never disclosed to anyone in their offline lives. Rather than concentrating primarily on ways of blocking and censoring such sites, we should think about online opportunities to reach out to people in emotional distress. However, deliberately encouraging or assisting suicide online is already a criminal offence and, where possible, the authorities should use their existing powers to prosecute malicious individuals who do this.’