Harmless are recruiting counsellors and therapists for mental health, self harm and suicide support

Harmless are looking to recruit therapists (bank staff) to work with clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.

JOB TITLE: Sessional Therapists (Bank Staff)

We are currently recruiting sessional counsellors to supplement our permanent Harmless team. This role will primarily involve working with clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.

‘Bank staff’ will provide cover for both planned and unplanned leave within the clinical team as well as bringing specific skills, knowledge and experience for short periods of time.

MAIN PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE JOB

  • To provide sessional counselling people to clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.
  • To work collaboratively and assertively with the communities and environments where a person is already in contact to provide information, containment and enhance a collaborative recovery approach for the person experiencing mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.
  • Counsellors must be accredited with BACP or equivalent. Unfortunately we will not consider anyone who is not accredited at this time.

Application closing date: Close of business on 20th June

Interviews: w/c 23rd June and/or 30th June 2014

For more information about this position or for an application form, Job description and person specification – please email info@harmless.org.uk

Harmless and The Tomorrow Project invited to become a member of The National Suicide Prevention Alliance (NSPA)

A member of Harmless and the Tomorrow Project team has been recently been in contact with The National Suicide Prevention Alliance (NSPA). We are really pleased to announce that Harmless and the Tomorrow Project have been invited to become a member and will be attending their national conference on the 19th June 2014 to apply.

The NSPA is a cross-sector, England wide coalition committed to: reducing the number of suicides in England, improving support for those bereaved or affected by suicide. Their ethos echoes that of Harmless and the Tomorrow Project; Every life lost to suicide is a tragedy and if we work together, suicide can be prevented.

We will work collaboratively to uphold the following;

  1. Deliver guidance and support materials for local authorities
    The combined knowledge and expertise of NSPA member organisations will provide materials to support action planning by local and regional suicide prevention leads, encourage sharing of good practice, and experiences of developing and carrying out successful local strategies.
  2. Identify and reduce access to harmful sites
    Establish a shared position and course of action for suicide-related websites or web areas that are harmful or illegal; produce guidance for why they are harmful and develop recommendations for what can be done to reduce access to them. This will involve working closely with industry providers and cross-government colleagues working in the area of online safety.
  3. Develop a ‘pathway’ of support for people bereaved by suicide
    Establish and support a national framework which means that people bereaved or affected by a suicide are offered options for effective, timely, proactive and wide-ranging support.
  4. Map and evaluate suicide prevention training
    Commission a detailed report identifying nationally available suicide prevention training. This report will evaluate available training programmes against set-criteria to deliver an independent and comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of these training programmes, supporting informed choice of provider and available courses.
  5. Launch a public conference
    To bring together people involved in suicide prevention including those who; work in services, policy, research, delivery at local/regional level. To share best practice, consult on priorities and develop ideas on what the NSPA should seek to achieve in future. To raise the profile of the NSPA and encourage new members.

The NSPA will build upon the shared aims and priorities developed under the Call to Action.

Service user writes about their difficult journey, hope and a bright future

As you may have seen, we have recently asked service users to write a blog about their experience of self harm and accessing support at Harmless. Today’s blog echoes our ethos of hope; that although the journey may be difficult, with the right help and support life can get better.

‘Where do you start when your asked to write a blog on such a serious and sensitive topic? Especially when it’s to inform the many people affected by self harm,  how you were affected by a serious issue that can happen to anyone! I suppose a good way to start would be the effect that self harm had on me.

I thought I was alone. I thought I was different. I thought everything was my fault. I thought self harm was the only option and no body at all could help me change that. I thought wrong.

Of course it wasn’t easy but the things worth doing never are, but this was my first step to recovery and the beginning of a new chapter of my life.

I thought I’d give Harmless a go. After all if I didn’t like it I didn’t have to go again. The first week was scary, the tension was building up as the day got closer but that’s completely normal, just like trying anything you haven’t done before.

I met Adrienne, she seemed nice so I went again. I found the first few weeks a bit scary but as time went on I got more comfortable. One week had turned in to two weeks, two into three and eventually three into a year and a half.

I was terrified teenager, struggling to cope with every day occurrences and self harming to get through each day. Thanks to Harmless I am me again. The past is a learning curve for me and the people I love and although I can’t predict the future I’m pretty sure it will be a bright, but that’s thanks to harmless for helping me secure one. Without them I would still be surrounded by all the negative thoughts that are now behind me. All you have to remember is everybody deserves happiness, including you. Now when the going gets tough I know where to go.’

For more information about Harmless, please visit our website www.harmless.org.uk

Harmless looking to recruit therapists (bank staff) to work with clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide

Harmless are looking to recruit therapists (bank staff) to work with clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.

JOB TITLE: Sessional Therapists (Bank Staff)

We are currently recruiting sessional counsellors to supplement our permanent Harmless team. This role will primarily involve working with clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.

‘Bank staff’ will provide cover for both planned and unplanned leave within the clinical team as well as bringing specific skills, knowledge and experience for short periods of time.

MAIN PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE JOB

  • To provide sessional counselling people to clients who experience mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.
  • To work collaboratively and assertively with the communities and environments where a person is already in contact to provide information, containment and enhance a collaborative recovery approach for the person experiencing mental health problems and/or that self harm or are at risk of self harm and suicide.
  • Counsellors must be accredited with BACP or equivalent. Unfortunately we will not consider anyone who is not accredited at this time.

Application closing date: Close of business on 6th June

Interviews: w/c 9th June and/or 16th June 2014

For more information about this position or for an application form, Job description and person specification – please email info@harmless.org.uk

The Tomorrow Project team present to members of The Alliance for Suicide Prevention Charities (TASC)

A member of the Tomorrow Project team presented the work currently undertaken within the Tomorrow Project to members of The Alliance of Suicide Prevention Charities (TASC) in London on Friday.

TASC is an alliance of the leading charities dealing with suicide prevention and mental health issues. TASC came together as an initiative to encourage collaboration and prevent duplication of efforts and funding in the area of suicide research and prevention. The Aliance was set up in November 2010 and holds quarterly meetings to discuss common goals, current research and future actions.

The Department of Health (DOH) launched a new cross-government strategy ‘Preventing suicide in England‘. The new strategy has been informed by a consultation on the draft suicide prevention strategy in 2011 and TASC was involved in the important consultation process.

The strategy supports action by bringing together knowledge about groups at higher risk of suicide, applying evidence of effective interventions and highlighting resources available.  This will support local decision-making, while recognising the autonomy of local organisations to decide what works in their area.

TASC are now continuing to work to make sure that the strategy is implemented at local level and that there is accountability when this fails to happen.

On the day, our representative  spoke about the history and ethos of our work including the support and training undertaken within educational establishments  and community as a whole.

This was a valuable opportunity to network with key members within TASC; developing an understanding of their participation and  involvement in ensuring implementation of the ‘Preventing Suicide in England ‘strategy at a local level.

The dedication of The Alliance in its work to improve suicide prevention is evident and The Tomorrow Project’s focus to inform, consult, support and respond flexibly as a preventative and post-ventative approach was akin to principles of TASC.

Harmless and The Tomorrow Project will look to maintain links with The Alliance by working collaboratively and continuing to support the prevention of self harm and suicide both locally and throughout the UK.

For further information  please refer to the websites:

www.harmless.org.uk

www.tomorrowproject.org.uk

Email:

info@harmless.org.uk or support@tomorrowproject.org.uk 

Self harm and wellbeing training for schools and colleges

Harmless have a substantial history of working with schools, colleges and education establishments to uphold their learning around self harm. Our range of packages can be tailored to meet the needs of staff and students alike.

We offer PSHE packages for students as well as teacher and pastoral staff training.

PSHE Lessons and Student Packages

Rates of self harm amongst young people are high, with estimates of up to a third of 11-19 year olds having engaged with some self harming activity during this time.

Harmless can work with your school to develop workshop based, classroom experiences for students aged 11+. Work with students is a successful way of developing awareness of self harm amongst young people and their peer groups.

For more information, click here or email training@harmless.org.uk

Training for Teaching and Pastoral Staff

Harmless can deliver young people specific packages of training suitable for learning and staff development days, of varied length and intensity.

Harmless is experienced in working with young people, and in supporting the education sector to meet the psychological needs of their students. The National Inquiry into Self-harm among Young People advocates that services engaged with young people, specifically schools and colleges, should consider the roll out of self harm training for their staff.

For more information, click here or email training@harmless.org.uk 

Feedback From Previous Workshops and Training Days:

  • 100% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop developed their understanding of self harm
  • 92% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop developed their understanding of emotional wellbeing
  • 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop made them better aware of where they can go to get help
  • 91% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the trainer’s personal experience helped improve their understanding
  • 96% of staff agreed or strongly agreed the training will help them do their job more effectively
  • 99% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that the trainer’s use of personal experience helped their understanding
  • 98% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that they will be able to put into practice the skills/knowledge they have learned on the training
  • 100% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that the training developed their understanding of the relationship between well-being and coping

Harmless and Tomorrow Project attend NSPCC/Childline roundtable on suicide and self harm

Yesterday a representative of Harmless and The Tomorrow Project team attended, by invitation from Peter Wanless, the NSPCC/ Childline roundtable on suicide and self harm.

In 2012/2013 Childline counselling sessions with young people feeling suicidal rose 33% (the 3rd year running in which a rise has been reported), whilst self harm was mentioned in almost 47,000 counselling sessions ( 41% year on year increase) .

Childline are currently working on a report which will examine further suicide and self harm amongst young people, considering what can lead young people to self harm or feel suicidal, and therefore making recommendations of how to best support individuals affected.

Professionals from many services across the country attended to discuss how we can better understand and share, what young people are telling us, what needs to be done by those in a position to better protect children and therefore achieving this in a collaborative way.

This meeting was the beginning of the process of collecting the views of experts in the field, to feed into the report and consider how we can work collaboratively to secure better support for young people.

Accessing our self harm support services from the perspective of a client

We have recently invited clients to contribute to our blog by asking them to write a short piece about their experience of accessing our self harm support services. The latest blog is written by a client who reflects on their own journey…

‘When I was asked if I wanted to contribute to a blog for harmless It was difficult to know where to start. So I decided to start with my experience of self harm and how I got better. I don’t self harm now but it wasn’t without a fight leaving me feeling, scared and lost.

I went to Harmless with a friend, she helped me face it all, I knew I had to do it then or not at all. I saw Adrienne who spoke to me and told me about Harmless and what to expect from them. She asked me about myself and it all came out.

I didn’t have many meetings because I didn’t need them, just a few, over three months – that was enough to get things sorted in my head. I really feel that I wouldn’t have made it through my last year of school without the support I got.

Thank you to everyone at Harmless. I always know where to turn now if life gets tough.’

For more information about Harmless or our support services, click here or email info@harmless.org.uk

Harmless client raises over £600 for self harm and suicide prevention work

A few weeks ago Deborah and her husband Mark cycled 300 miles from London to Paris in 4 days to raise money for Harmless and the Tomorrow Project.
We are extremely pleased to say that so far Deborah has raised a whopping £584 and received a gift aid donation, taking the total to £659.50

Everyone at Harmless is so proud of Deborah for making this journey and are delighted at the support she has received.

Read about Deborah’s journey on our blog page by clicking here.

There is still time to donate to this courageous effort, just go to the local giving page via this link https://localgiving.com/fundraising/harmlesslondon2paris 

Why is fundraising important?

Harmless is an organisation that was set up by people who understand self harm. It provides services for self harm including: support: information: training & consultancy to people who self harm, their friends & families & professionals.

Harmless now deliver a range of services. They previously delivered these under contract with Nottinghamshire Healthcare Trust but these funds were lost due to the financial cuts. However, they still deliver monthly drop in sessions where people can get support and information about self harm and they offer one to one therapy sessions.

The Tomorrow Project is a suicide prevention project that has been set up to support individuals & communities to prevent suicide.

Self Harm and Suicide Prevention Work in Nottingham Colleges

As part of the ongoing efforts of the Tomorrow Project in the community, our representatives introduced our self harm and suicide prevention work at a local Nottingham college where key strategies of prevention, intervention and postvention were discussed.

The format of the Tomorrow Project  is delivered via a flexible programme of:

  • Staff training sessions ,
  • PSHE style workshops ,
  • Informal support
  • Parent information sessions
  • Information stands

The response of college personnel to this work which has been commissioned by the Nottingham CCG was very favourable.

Harmless and the Tomorrow Project  continues to raise awareness of our work of information sharing, challenging stigma of mental health issues, and supporting individuals identified as being at risk of self harm or suicide.

For further information  please refer to the websites:

www.tomorrowproject.org.uk

www.harmless.org.uk

 

 Email:

info@harmless.org.uk