Teenage mental health… our future

All in the mind on BBC Radio 4 discusses the issues surrounding teenage mental health.  Claudia Hammond is joined by a panel of experts, Shirley Reynolds, Dr Dickon Bevington, Kimberley Robinson and Sarah Hulyer, to discuss the pressures teenagers face and offer thoughts on how services could be reshaped to cope with this changing demand as well as suggest what parents can do to help their teenagers.

This radio programme is definitely worth a listen. With 1 in 10, 5-15yr olds experiencing a mental health difficulty and 1 in 5 of those adolescents being rejected for treatment, teenage mental health is a growing concern.

Furthermore risk factors for mental health difficulties appear to be expanding. Not only does deprivation and abuse influence teenage mental health, Shirley Reynolds also highlights the high numbers of adolescents who are struggling within enriched environments. So why is this?

The show went out into the community for the answer and with around 5,000 responses with these 5 themes appeared. These included school stress, Bullying, Sexual pressures, uncertain futures and lack of access to help. The theme ‘uncertain futures’ was one that hit home with me. Many of the responses discussed the problem of identity and the pressures and expectations to know who you are and where you are going. It was clear that these expectations led to perfectionist beliefs which in turn left many adolescents fearful of failure. Some described a choking anxiety and an all-consuming fear of making mistakes.

These young people are our future, they are blank pages waiting to absorb the wonders of the world we live in. They will continue our work, our beliefs, our hopes and yet are we nurturing and guiding them into healthy, resilient, hopeful beings? Or do we need to change? Just because something worked before doesn’t mean it is supportive now, we need to change our support strategies and adapt to the needs of our future generations.

If you would like to watch this show, please click the following link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06kch0z

If you want to know more about how to support young people with mental health difficulties and you live or work in Nottingham City why not sign up for some free mental health workshops.

 

Monday 16th November

MHFA Lite 9:30am – 12:30pm

MHFA Lite is an introductory mental health awareness course. You’ll receive a MHFA Lite manual that you can take away with you at the end of the session and also an attendance certificate from MHFA England

Thursday 19th November

Mental Health Awareness Training for Frontline Workers 1:00pm – 5:00pm

This workshop will focus on improving skills and confidence to recognise people with mental health problems and offer appropriate support

Friday 27th November

Mental Health Community Workshop – Carers and Citizens 1:30pm – 3:30pm

These workshops will focus on how to promote resilience and wellbeing in the community through building of awareness and resilience amongst citizens and carers

A drop in session will be held after the Community Workshop

Monday 30th November

Mental Health in the Workplace – Managers training 1:00pm – 5:00pm

This course will examine how practical support can be provided to create m environment that is healthy for staff and promote interventions to raise awareness.

The course will show delegates what they can do to support other staff and colleagues who may be experiencing problems with their mental health

By improving mental health outcomes at work delegates will benefit from;

•          Compliance with legislation such as the Equalities Act

•          Reduced grievance and discrimination claims

•          Demonstrable  corporate social responsibility

•          Reduced staff turnover

•          Reduced sickness absence

•          A healthier workplace

•          Better staff morale

•          More committed staff, and

•          Skills retention

 

Interested? Then please email training@harmless.org.uk, or call the office on 0115 934 8445, and ask to speak to one of our training team.

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in Today

We will be holding our next Adult Self Harm Drop-in session, for those ages 18 and over, today:

Wednesday 28th October at 15.30 – 16.30

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information and advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser).

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk.

Fancy being a life saver?

The truth is, when we think about saving lives – we think about lifeguards rushing into save the drowning, or an ambulance rushing to the scene of a medical emergency.

Rarely do we think of the ordinary situation, with the ordinary person walking down the street being called into action in a crisis situation. The reality is that this can happen on any street, in any part of the world, to any person on any day.

At Harmless we deliver a very specific type of life saving training. We deliver Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST).

ASIST training enables an individual to be effective if they encounter someone that is suicidal. The training enables the individual to look at their own prejudices and skills in a way that promotes the confidence to know what to do and how to do it should you meet someone who is suicidal. This might mean for some professionals, the training equips that person to do their job more effectively, but it also might mean that for the ordinary person, on an ordinary day – they have the training they might need to save a life.

Suicide can affect all individuals, at any time in their life, but any time a person is contemplating ending their life, there is an opportunity for help and change as long as they get the right support. You could be that support.

For more information about our ASIST training or to book please contact Harmless and ask for Sophie Allen (Training coordinator and ASIST trainer) or a member of our training team.

Email: training@harmless.org.uk, or Telephone: 0115 9348445

 

Details of our next ASIST training session:

Special Discounted Price of £150 per delegate.

Dates: Thursday 10th & Friday 11th December 2015.

Times: 9am until 5pm (both days).

Location: Harmless, NCVS Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB.

Resources, refreshments and lunch will be provided as part of the training package.

Please note: Attendance on both days of the workshop is mandatory 

Could you write a blog for us?

Harmless would like to invite you to contribute to our blog. Our blog is important to us because it helps us convey a range of issues around self harm and suicide to the public. It helps us reach people in distress and promote better understanding about these issues amongst our readers.

It helps us tell you about our work, upcoming events, dispel myths and offer advice. But we also want it to challenge stigma and to offer real stories about self harm and recovery so that people reading this can feel connected to what we do and who we help.

If you would like to write a blog for us about your experiences, then you can submit this to info@harmless.org.uk with the title ‘blog post’. In your email, please tell us what name you would like us to use for you. You can say as little about your identity as you want.

The blog should be about 200 -300 words in length and shouldn’t be graphic in any way, but should offer the reader an insight into your experiences that mighty help them relate to self harm, distress, or suicide. The blog could be about what you’ve felt or experienced, what’s helped, or not helped… What needs to change, or what he stigma around these issues has been for you.

It is vital to harmless that we represent your voice and your experiences, so if you feel you can contribute to this blog, please do.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in This Wednesday

We will be holding our next Adult Self Harm Drop-in session, for those ages 18 and over, on:

Wednesday 28th October at 15.30 – 16.30

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information and advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser).

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk.

Exciting opportunity to feature in a forthcoming series of short films about mental health conditions?

Have you experienced depression or anxiety, psychosis or bipolar disorder; self harmed or attempted suicide?

Are you a carer of someone who has experienced the above?

Would you like your voice to be heard? Can you inspire others with your experiences?

The films will encourage a range of people from different backgrounds to speak about different mental health conditions and will be used to challenge stigma and discrimination as well as help professionals to understand the issues faced by people with mental health problems.

Please get in touch if you’d like to be involved at caroline@harmless.org.uk

In the News: Mental health stigma campaign starts

A campaign to reduce the stigma around mental health in children has been launched by the government.

It will use school visits and social media to urge young people and parents to talk more about mental health.

Health Minister Alistair Burt said the campaign was “the largest ever” and would include an online hub of mental health information.

Charities welcomed the move, but criticised a delay to a new survey of child mental health.

The Time to Change charity says three children in every classroom experience mental health problems ranging from self-harming to eating disorders.

The campaign will also see the launch of the Youth Mental Health Hub website to help children find accurate information about mental health conditions. 

 

Mr Burt will say in a speech later: “This is something that young people have asked for – better information about mental health, tailored specifically for them, online.”

He will add the campaign marks the “biggest transformation to young people’s mental health and one of the greatest investments the sector has seen”.

Meanwhile, the first survey of young people’s mental health since 2004 has been commissioned. 

Nearly 10,000 people aged from two to 19 and their families will be interviewed to assess the prevalence of mental health issues.

For the full article, please visit the following link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-34597424

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in next Wednesday

Our next Harmless self harm drop in for Adults aged 18 and over will be held on:

Wednesday 28th October at 15.30 – 16.30

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information and advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser).

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk.

Would you like to feature in a forthcoming series of short films about mental health conditions?

Have you experienced depression or anxiety, psychosis or bipolar disorder; self harmed or attempted suicide?

Are you a carer of someone who has experienced the above?

Would you like your voice to be heard? Can you inspire others with your experiences?

The films will encourage a range of people from different backgrounds to speak about different mental health conditions and will be used to challenge stigma and discrimination as well as help professionals to understand the issues faced by people with mental health problems.

Please get in touch if you’d like to be involved at caroline@harmless.org.uk

In the News: Stress can cause pupils to self harm, say nearly half of school staff

Nearly two-thirds of education staff believe pressure on teachers and schools to succeed is one of the main causes of student stress, resulting in self harm, drug abuse and eating disorders.

New research from teaching union the ATL shows that 65 per cent of respondents think pupils are stressed out owing to testing and exams; 48 per cent think pupils suffer from stress because of an overcrowded curriculum and 21 per cent think the cause is the volume of homework.

Sixty-one per cent of respondents believe the pressure on teachers and schools to do well cascades down to pupils, while almost a quarter (22 per cent) think students are worried about getting into the best school or university.

One primary teacher from Oxford, who took part in the survey, said: “Pupils are picking up on teachers’ stress owing to inspections and lack of choice of how and what to teach.”

The survey reveals that many education professionals believe rising stress levels are leading to self harm, attempted suicides and eating disorders among students.

Forty-four per cent of education staff think young people self harm as a direct result of pressure, while 31 per cent believe pressure results in eating disorders and 12 per cent think it can cause attempted suicide.

Thirty-four per cent of respondents think students skive off as a result of pressure and stress, while 21 per cent say students take recreational drugs to alleviate the pressure.

Almost two-thirds (64 per cent) say pupils in their school are under more pressure and stress than two years ago.

A secondary teacher from Cambridge said: “These issues were still prevalent 10 years ago, but now, I think, we are better at identifying them. Sadly, there is still not enough funding to do much. Students can sometimes wait months for an initial assessment, even when suicidal.”

The survey of 1,250 ATL members working in primary and secondary schools, academies and sixth-forms was carried out in August and September this year.

Speaking ahead of ATL’s fringe event on pupil wellbeing at the Labour Party conference, Dr Mary Bousted, the union’s general secretary, said: “It is shocking that so many young people are under so much stress that they self harm. It is also alarming that much of the pressure and stress is caused by the education system and this needs to be a wake-up call to policymakers.”

To read the full article, please visit: https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/stress-can-cause-pupils-self-harm-say-nearly-half-school-staff