Harmless Self Harm Drop in this Wednesday

Harmless will be hosting their next young person drop in session on:

Wednesday  18th November  at 3:30pm – 4:30pm

for young people aged up to 21 years.

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, & Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

Thank you to Children In Need for supporting our young people self harm services

Tonight we will see the return of BBC Children in Need’s appeal show – an annual event which looks to raise money that will be used to make a real difference to the lives of disadvantaged children across the UK.  

Since their first major Appeal in 1980 BBC Children in Need has raised over £790 million, supporting thousands of projects to help achieve their vision; that every child in the UK has a childhood which is safe, happy and secure and allows them the chance to reach their potential.

Harmless are one of the many projects that have benefited from the money raised by the public and Children In Need.

In 2012, Harmless were awarded £88,910 over a 3 year period and supported more than 300 young people aged 10 to 18 who self-harm (or are at risk of self-harm).

In 2015, Harmless were awarded a further £109,489 to provide weekly counselling support for those who self harm or at risk of suicide. This project will run for 3 years and will help even more people who need our vital services.

On behalf the Harmless team, I would like to thank Children in Need and their team for the continued support that they have given to Harmless and our service users. We wish everyone all the best and hope that they have another record breaking evening.

Darren Whelband (Business and Operations Manager)

Watch Appeal Show 2015 on BBC One from 7:30pm on Friday 13 November

You can donate to Children in Need by clicking here

To learn more about our self harm support services, please contact Harmless by emailing info@harmless.org.uk

 

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in next Wednesday

Harmless will be hosting their next young person drop in session on:

Wednesday  18th November  at 3:30pm – 4:30pm

for young people aged up to 21 years.

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, & Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

 

In the News: Rising numbers of stressed students seek help

Record numbers of students are beginning university this term, making the big emotional step of a new independent life, with many living away from home for the first time.

But there are warnings of rising numbers of students struggling to cope with life on campus, with sharp rises in the demand for counselling.

And there are questions about whether universities are providing enough support for emotional and mental health problems.

Ruth Caleb, chair of Universities UK’s mental well-being working group, says counselling services are facing an annual rise in demand of about 10%.

She estimates the use of counselling usually ranges between 5% and 10% of students, depending on the university, which would suggest at least 115,000 students are seeking help.

Sir Anthony Seldon, vice chancellor of Buckingham University, says this is a “massive problem” and universities have been “negligent” in accepting their pastoral responsibilities.

For the full article, please click on the following link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34354405

If you would like more information on the support we can provide, please contact us at: info@harmless.org.uk.

And if you are interested in receiving information about the training we provide, please contactus at: training@harmless.org.uk.

Could you write a blog for us?

Harmless would like to invite you to contribute to our blog. Our blog is important to us because it helps us convey a range of issues around self harm and suicide to the public. It helps us reach people in distress and promote better understanding about these issues amongst our readers.

It helps us tell you about our work, upcoming events, dispel myths and offer advice. But we also want it to challenge stigma and to offer real stories about self harm and recovery so that people reading this can feel connected to what we do and who we help.

If you would like to write a blog for us about your experiences, then you can submit this to info@harmless.org.uk with the title ‘blog post’. In your email, please tell us what name you would like us to use for you. You can say as little about your identity as you want.

The blog should be about 200 -300 words in length and shouldn’t be graphic in any way, but should offer the reader an insight into your experiences that mighty help them relate to self harm, distress, or suicide. The blog could be about what you’ve felt or experienced, what’s helped, or not helped… What needs to change, or what he stigma around these issues has been for you.

It is vital to harmless that we represent your voice and your experiences, so if you feel you can contribute to this blog, please do.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Who is responsible for the mental health of our children and young people?

This is a hot topic of conversation that everyone will have an opinion. Should our schools take a role in helping our children and young people have good mental health – or is that the responsibility of parents and families? Or does the responsibility sit elsewhere within the community, say for instance, with the NHS?

There has been tonnes in the media of late adding to this debate:

  • NHS promises funds for the mental health of children and young people
  • Education is adding to the distress experienced by young people
  • Stress from school is perceived to be contributing to self harm in our students

Article, after article, after article. The truth is, the emotional health and wellbeing of our children and young people is all of our responsibilities and does not fall to just one arena. However, there are things that we know are increasingly starting to show in the evidence and research about the wellbeing of our young people. For instance, we know that more young people are self harming. We know that the suicide rate in the UK is going up. We know that mental health problems are also on the up, more generally, in our younger generation.

We also know that the average age a girl in the UK goes on her first diet… is age 9. Yes, 9 years old and the average age of onset for self harm is 13, with reports of self harm in much younger children, with rates estimated as high as 33% in teenagers.

Surely then, we must ask ourselves not just who is responsible for this worsening in the wellbeing of our children, but what we can each do about it to make the changes for our young people that will keep them healthy in the future.

As a parent, some of that is my responsibility. I need to equip my children with the attachment and security of knowing they are safe and loved, accepted and resilient – encouraging them towards developing the knowledge and skills that makes them a unique person with the ability to manage how they feel. But say I get that right, is that what the world will teach them when they enter into it?

Or does the voice of the masses tell us to conform? Not be different? Perform?

Do our schools tell our children that they have value as a person? Or is their value in their grades?

Does our NHS always reinforce the message that our children will be cared for consistently and without prejudice?

The truth is that sometimes we get it right and sometimes we don’t. It would be easy to say that ‘that’s life’ and ‘kids just have to learn to survive it’ but they’re not doing. More and more young people are dying by suicide, in fact it is the second biggest killer of young people in the UK – if that were cancer – we would all be dancing on the rooftops calling for change – for more treatments, for more help…

Why because it is mental health do we not fight harder, or shout louder for the rights of our children and young people to grow up safe and healthy and why are we letting them die because they are so unhappy?

There is a lot we need to change. But before we even get to the part where we make change – we each have to question, in our own lives and communities and worlds, what it is that we need to change in order to create happy and healthy and thriving children and young people that aren’t going to spend the rest of their lives recovering from that very childhood that should have equipped them for life.

Please, give it a thought.

If you would like any more information about the Mental Health, Self Harm and Suicide training we provide, please contact us at training@harmless.org.uk.

Ever had the thought that you have had enough? Or that you can’t go on anymore? Me Too

Ever had the thought that you have had enough? Or that you can’t go on anymore?

Me too.

In fact, it is more common than you think. Probably still under reported, it is estimated that 1 in 20 of us think about suicide at some point and that’s even higher in men, with 42% of males contemplating ending their life.

The thing is, having the thoughts is relatively normal. Sometimes we just reach breaking point. We have a certain amount of capacity to deal with what life throws at us until we feel overwhelmed and at breaking point.

If you are reading this and don’t understand what I am saying, then be glad, because no matter how bad you have felt, you probably haven’t actually been at breaking point, or at least you have had enough positive factors in your life to bring you back from that place.

Sometimes breaking point comes quickly – you don’t see it coming. For others, it can be a prolonged and sustained build up of the pain that life can throw at you: one thing after another, until you just don’t know how to fix anything or cope anymore.

In this situation what is vital, is that we get some help – from someone we trust or can approach, whether that be a friend or a professional, a stranger or a family member. It almost doesn’t matter who you go to. It doesn’t matter where you get that help – it just matters that you get it; that you tell someone loud and clear, that you are suffering.

It isn’t in the big things always that we find a way back from breaking point. It is in the little things. It is in someone holding our hand when we need some comfort, or making a cup of tea and listening to us when we need to vent, or it might be in the silence on the end of a phone that tells us we are not alone.

But get that help, because without it those thoughts might just turn into actions, and the actions of a desperate person can lead to tragedy.

And we don’t want that.

Life can get better, even if it feels bleak.

The Tomorrow Project in running for a Community Award

The Tomorrow Project is delighted to announce that it has been shortlisted for a Rushcliffe Community Awards for Enabling Healthier Communities for its local suicide prevention work. 
Caroline Harroe who leads the project, has also been shortlisted for the Local Hero Award for her contribution to The Tomorrow Project, locally. 
The Tomorrow continues to support people in and around East Leake and neighbouring villages. It provides ongoing support to people in distress, works with young people in East Leake Academy and responds in a crisis when someone is at risk of suicide.
At present we have no finances for this work, which is a tragedy, given that the work that we do saves lives. 
We hear on Wednesday whether we have won our category. Wish us luck everyone! Maybe with the positive publicity we might generate some funding that can secure the future of the project. 
If you’d like to help, spread the word, share our page, share our donations link. 
Thank you for the support everyone!
https://localgiving.com/charity/harmless/project/tomorrowproject

I have something to ask you…

Why is it so difficult to get you to talk about mental health?

This is something that perplexes us here at Harmless. We deliver a range of mental health courses – in the community, in schools, for joe blogs, for professionals… and it is never easy to get bums on seats, even when we are giving it away…

Sometimes, I have to be honest, it can feel frustrating, to say the least. WE know that what we have to say about mental health can change the way that person feels about responding to mental health… we also know it can have a huge impact on the life of someone experiencing mental health problems. So why won’t people come to the training?

Is it because of stigma?

Is it because of fear?

Is it because we know it all, already?

OR is it because you are just not interested and think it is not your responsibility?

I don’t have the answers, but I do know, even when training is free… it is so difficult to people to give up 3 hours of their life and come along.

The training that we do for free, isn’t there forever – it is there for a limited amount of time. Having it could mean that you feel more confident to help a friend, or a stranger on the street… a customer where you work, an employee or colleague, or a family member.

Mental health is your business. It is not just the business of mental health professionals because mental health problems effect 1 in 4 of us over just 1 year. And suicide is the biggest killer of males under 45 in our county and 42% of all males contemplating suicide at some point.

Shouldn’t we do our best to know how to respond to that? Isn’t that what we would want from someone if we needed help – for them to have the confidence and willingness to have a conversation with us, whoever that might be?

So please, can you join the conversation about mental health and come along to some training?

If you want to learn more about Mental Health and you live or work within Nottingham City why not sign up for one of our free workshops, see details below:

 

Monday 16th November:
Mental health first aid lite
9:30am – 12:30pm

Thursday 19th November:
Mental health awareness training for frontline workers
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Friday 27th November:
Mental health community workshop – Carers and citizens
1:30pm – 3:30pm.
A drop in session will be held after the community workshop

Monday 30th November:
Mental health in the workplace – Managers training
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Training will be delivered* at:
Harmless
NCVS
7 Mansfield Road
Nottingham
NG1 3FB

*If the training reaches full capacity, the training location will be in a different location, however it will be local to NCVS and you will be informed in plenty of time before any deliveries take place

To book a place, please contact training@harmless.org.uk

Places are extremely limited so book promptly to avoid disappointment. Please note to be eligible for this training you must live or work in the city.

Mental Health and Finance

The other day whilst delivering training we were discussing what factors support recovery and whilst a big list of various factors was mentioned a common feature missed is financial security.

We have all probably felt the sinking feeling when you open an empty wallet to find nothing but a couple of crisp receipts, or the sudden shock when you receive an unexpected bill. Finances are a fundamental part of everyone’s life and the impact of financial stress can have catastrophic effects for an individual, a family or even a business.

Over the years it can be said that money has become more and more digitised, with online banking and contactless cards almost creating a fictitious material. However, finances have very real, very tangible connections. Money can cause big rifts within relationships, divide houses and dissipate dreams. Considering all this it becomes obvious that financial security would be a crucial factor when supporting recovery for individuals with mental health conditions.

“Be under no illusions. Mental health problems can cause severe debt, and severe debt can cause mental health problems.” Martin Lewis (2015).

Martin Lewis from MoneySavingExpert.com has recently brought out a guide to ‘Mental health & Debt’ and I must say this is certainly a step in the right direction. Credit rating and managing your finances effectively is hard at the best of times but when you are suffering inside this can have even bigger repercussions.  Money is an integral part of the modern world and rather than immobilising someone with a mental health condition we should be empowering them in doing so we will be supporting the individual on their journey of recovery.

If you want to learn more about Mental Health and you live or work within Nottingham City why not sign up for one of our free workshops, see details below:

Monday 16th November:
Mental health first aid lite
9:30am – 12:30pm

Thursday 19th November:
Mental health awareness training for frontline workers
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Friday 27th November:
Mental health community workshop – Carers and citizens
1:30pm – 3:30pm.
A drop in session will be held after the community workshop

Monday 30th November:
Mental health in the workplace – Managers training
1:00pm – 5:00pm

Training will be delivered* at:
Harmless
NCVS
7 Mansfield Road
Nottingham
NG1 3FB

*If the training reaches full capacity, the training location will be in a different location, however it will be local to NCVS and you will be informed in plenty of time before any deliveries take place

To book a place, please contact training@harmless.org.uk

Places are extremely limited so book promptly to avoid disappointment. Please note to be eligible for this training you must live or work in the city.