Self Harm Conference: From Harm to Hope. Tuesday 1st March 2016

SPECIAL DELEGATE RATE

AVAILABLE UNTIL 29TH JANUARY 2016

Two delegate Places for £200*

 

Places must be booked by 29th January 2016 to receive this offer.

*Usual Price £150 per delegate place. A saving of £100 per two places. Price will rise to £150 per delegate after the offer has ended. There is a limited number of discounted tickets available.

 

What is the purpose of the conference?

The theme of our launch event conference is empowering communities through collaboration.

Harmless recognises that self harm effects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

We are happy to confirm that Time to Change will be joining us at our 1st national self harm conference and will be providing the opening remarks. Associate Professor Dr Ellen Townsend from the University of Nottingham will also be joining us and will be sharing current findings from the DoH funded Listen Up! Project looking at self harm in looked after children and young people.

Dr Christabel Owens, Senior Research Fellow from the University of Exeter, will be joining us to speak about children and young people’s experiences of accessing A&E and Karen Lascelles (Suicide Prevention Lead Nurse) and her team from Oxford NHS Team will be sharing their perspectives on brief interventions with those that self harm.

Keith Waters, Clinical Advisor (Suicide Prevention) at East Midlands Academic Health Science Network will be joining us and speaking alongside our CEO, Caroline Harroe, who will be encouraging a diverse and engaging programme for professionals and carers interested in the field of self harm to learn and benefit from current thinking, information, best practice and advice.

Marie Armstrong, Nurse Consultant to CAMHS (specialist self-harm team) will bring her expertise in working with young people that self harm and families and the programme is also extremely lucky to host our colleague Hayley Green from Write Minds, who will be running a spoken word workshop on the day to demonstrate the effectiveness of employing the arts in the treatment of self harm and mental health difficulties. Dr James Roe & Harriet Ball from the University of Nottingham will also be discussing the progress of their e-DASH: Depressions and self harm study.

Workshops:

  • Harmless – Sophie Allen: Building resilience – Brief interventions when working towards recovery.
  • Harmless – Sarah Kessling: Risk Assessment and Intervention for high risk groups.
  • Write Minds – Hayley Green: Unlocking the tales within: Explore the way writing and performance poetry can help give vulnerable people a voice.
  • Anne Garland: Listening without prejudice: making psychological sense of self-harm within a cognitive-behavioural formulation.
  • Marie Armstrong: The social context of young people and self-harm
  • Dr Ellen Townsend: Psychological factors associated with self-harm and suicidality, and interventions that promote recovery, especially in young people.
  • Self Injury Support: Supporting a diverse range of needs within one service model – how can we adapt services to support a wide range of clients with varying needs?
  • Keith Waters: Drawing from his experience on the NSPA, the multi-centre study for self harm & EMHSRN this workshop will demonstrate what we already know & demonstrate how existing data collected can help to inform responses
  • Self Harm Focus Group: Be Involved! Public Engagement in Self Harm Focus Group.
  • Hannah Heath: Co-creating a resource for the friends of those who self-harm: A collaborative enterprise.
  • Pam Burrows: How to Feel Good…even on a bad day.

Venue:

The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre. For directions please click here

Where can I find more information?

If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, or to book tickets, then please email jack@harmless.org.uk

Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 934 8445

In the News: Schools are not training us to tackle mental health problems, teachers say…

Only a third of teachers say that they have been appropriately trained by their school to deal with pupils’ mental health problems, according to Government-funded research.

And just half know how to help pupils with these problems to access appropriate support. Classroom teachers were less likely than senior leaders to know how best to support pupils, according to questions commissioned by the Department for Education in the annual Teacher Voice survey.

More than 2,000 teachers took part in the poll, published by the National Foundation for Educational Research. Of these, only 32 per cent agreed that there was appropriate training for teachers in schools to enable them to identify mental health issues in pupils.

However, 62 per cent said that they felt equipped to identify pupil behaviour that may be linked to mental health problems.

This suggests, the report states, “that knowledge on how to identify potential mental health issues may be derived from means other than formal, in-school training”.

 

Click on the link for the full story..

https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/schools-are-not-training-us-tackle-mental-health-problems-teachers?platform=hootsuite

In the News: Why are British kids so unhappy? Two words: screen time.

It’s 12.30am, and time for my pre-bed ritual: tiptoe upstairs so as not to wake the children, brush my teeth, turn out the lights … and then catch sight of that telltale, flickering blue glow coming from under the 15-year-old’s bedroom door. I mentally prepare myself for the nightly battle, and knock

“Come on, Fred, turn your phone off – it’s nearly 1am and you’ve got school tomorrow.”

“Don’t lie, Dad. It’s not ‘nearly’ 1am. It’s only 12.30.”

“Just turn it off and get to sleep. Please. It’s only crappy videos on the internet – they’ll still be there in the morning. “But I’ve done nothing wrong!” (I paraphrase: this is a teenage boy we’re talking about here, so his “conversation” is littered with swearing and streetspeak, which are best left to the imagination.)

It wasn’t always like this: until a couple of years ago, rather than gawping at YouTubers drinking live goldfish and who knows what else they get up to, my darling boy wasted his waking hours playing games, specifically Mine-bloody-craft. How I hated it, with its stupid, make-believe world of pixellated, Lego-faced critters and monsters. Some commentators went so far as to argue that a Minecraft habit was somehow educational and healthy, the fools.

But it’s only a short step from there to the even more mindless Clash of Clans. Believe me, I know. And before you go there, yes, I have installed every parental control under the sun on the family desktop and router, but Fred’s 15 and I’m 52, so he runs rings round me technology-wise.

And it’s not just us parents who are made miserable by our offspring’s online addictions. Earlier this week the NSPCC chief executive, Peter Wanless, warned of a nation of deeply unhappy children, due to “the pressure to keep up with friends and have the perfect life online … adding to the sadness that many young people feel on a daily basis”.

Before you accuse me of being an appalling father (I do quite enough of that myself, thanks very much), new research by the charity Action For Children finds that a staggering one in four parents struggles to control their children’s screen use. We’re all in this together, it seems, which should be of some comfort. But the charity undermines its survey, in our house at least, by adding that a mere 10% of parents find it hard to get their kids to do homework (they’re having a laugh, right?), while 18% can’t get them to go to sleep at night (see above)

ACF spoils things further with suggestions for limiting children’s screen time, among them “plan fun activities for the whole family that don’t involve technology” (family activities, at 12.30am? Are they mad?); “create a balance between technology use and other activities” by insisting that, for every hour of screen, children should have to do an hour of something else (you try telling that to a near-10-stone lump of testosterone); “organise a board game night” (yes, definitely certifiable); and “practise what you preach … turn off your devices, too” (hang on: post-10.30pm is the only time I get to let off teen-based steam on Twitter).

Sorry, none of that’s ever going to work on Fred, or any other teen I know, for that matter; it’s way too late for that now. Nope, it’s time for some Victorian-style parenting, not least because we also have an 11-year-old, and I can’t be going through all this again. So last night we sat Fred down and laid down the law: from this Sunday, he’s to hand in his phone to us by 10.30pm on school nights – no discussion, no argument, just good old-fashioned “because I said so”. His response? “No way. That is so unfair. I’ve done nothing wrong! If you do this, I’ll just nick your Sim.” (Again, I’ll leave it to you to pepper that lot with profanities.)

For the full story, visit:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/07/british-kids-unhappy-screen-time-children

Become a community Champion, sponsor our National ‘From Harm to Hope Conference!’

Become a community Champion, sponsor our  National ‘From Harm to Hope Conference!’

Every day brings us closer to the 1st March. The office is humming with excitement for the big day. Fingers are tapping on keyboards, cheery voices can be heard on the phones and plans are being drawn up left, right and centre.

Each of us is putting in the extra mile as we don our conference hats and extend or job roles for the next month and half. Whether it is creating programmes, selling tickets, communicating with speakers or visiting the venue we are all busy preparing to put on the most innovative and successful start to Self harm awareness day!

One of my roles has been to circulate the information regarding our conference. Although this task may sound very repetitive it has been a fascinating opportunity that has allowed me to connect with our wider community. In just the space of an hour I have been speaking with a variety of accents from all around the country an opportunity I have really enjoyed.

As many of you will be aware Harmless is a not for profit organisation and this will also apply to the conference. We understand the importance of bringing the community and wider society together, discussing and sharing valuable information on the topic of Self harm and promoting hope and recovery for those in distress.

Unfortunately the price for putting on a conference does not come cheap and therefore we are looking for the support of our community. To make the event accessible for all we are looking for two levels of sponsorship.

1. A main conference sponsor – £1000

2. Community champions – £300

The community champions sponsorship will enable three people who are carers or small organisations to attend the conference for free. With the BBC and the evening post already committed to publicising the event we will very much promote the support of our sponsors and ensure that we continue to save lives! 

If you would like to sponsor us then please do get in touch, info@harmless.org.uk

Written by Harmless Trainer Sarah Kessling – Sarah will also be presenting at our conference and delivering a workshop around Risk Assessment and Intervention for high risk groups at our conference.

In the News: The pressure for the “perfect online life” is being blamed for a nation of “deeply unhappy” young teenagers.

ChildLine says many are dealing with fears and worries that didn’t exist 30 years ago.

In 2015 the charity says family relationships, confidence and unhappiness were the biggest issues for young people.

Bullying and self-harm also featured prominently.

“I use social media but that just makes me more depressed,” one girl said.

Overall, 35,244 of the counselling sessions held by the NSPCC-run service in 2014/15 were related to low self-esteem and unhappiness – up 9% on the year before.

I’m constantly worried about what other people are thinking of me and it’s really getting me down

There has also been a rise in the overall number of sessions the helpline runs each year, going from 23,530 in 1986/87 to 286,812 in 2014/15.

NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said: “It is clear from the hundreds of thousands of calls ChildLine receives that we have a nation of deeply unhappy children.

“The pressure to keep up with friends and have the perfect life online is adding to the sadness that many young people feel on a daily basis.”

To view the full article, please visit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35249872/chasing-the-perfect-online-life-is-making-you-unhappy

There is a mental health crisis that can’t be solved with £1 billion worth of funding.

There seems to be too many patients and not enough money to treat all them.  The country’s mental health service is in a dire state. This Government has spent years pushing the most vulnerable to the brink with cuts to vital services.

David Cameron became the first Prime Minister in history to address mental health in a public speech, calming that he wants to foster a more open and mature approach to mental health.

To do this he will have to tackle the country’s mental health crisis that has been affected by the austerity politics.

The demand for mental health services has risen by 20 per cent over the last five years, whilst the mental health budget was cut by 8 per cent in real terms.

There has been an increase in suicides since the tougher fit to work test began. Rethink found that 21 per cent of their patients experienced suicidal ideation due to the stress of Work Capability Assessments.

An NSPCC survey found that more than a fifth of children referred to child and adolescent mental  health services (CAMHS) in England were refused treatment.

Mental health services currently receive just 13 per cent of NHS budget. Over £11 billion worth of funding would be required to bridge the gap, yet the Government are prepared to inject only £1 billion.

This recent pledge might patch up a few holes but this still leaves major problems in mental health provision.

Could you write a blog for us?

Harmless would like to invite you to contribute to our blog. Our blog is important to us because it helps us convey a range of issues around self harm and suicide to the public. It helps us reach people in distress and promote better understanding about these issues amongst our readers.

It helps us tell you about our work, upcoming events, dispel myths and offer advice. But we also want it to challenge stigma and to offer real stories about self harm and recovery so that people reading this can feel connected to what we do and who we help.

If you would like to write a blog for us about your experiences, then you can submit this to info@harmless.org.uk with the title ‘blog post’. In your email, please tell us what name you would like us to use for you. You can say as little about your identity as you want.

The blog should be about 200 -300 words in length and shouldn’t be graphic in any way, but should offer the reader an insight into your experiences that mighty help them relate to self harm, distress, or suicide. The blog could be about what you’ve felt or experienced, what’s helped, or not helped… What needs to change, or what he stigma around these issues has been for you.

It is vital to harmless that we represent your voice and your experiences, so if you feel you can contribute to this blog, please do.

We look forward to hearing from you.

2 places for £200 Special Offer for our conference has been extended!

From Harm to Hope Self Harm Conference is taking place on 1st March 2016 at Nottingham Conference Center.

The conference is featuring a number of leading academics and specialists in the field of self harm research and prevention, which includes Dr Christabel Owens, Karen Lascelles, Dr Ellen Townsend, Dr James Roe and Harriet Ball and many more.

There will also be a range of workshops to attend in the afternoon of the conference, which includes presenters from Harmless, Self Injury Support and University of Chester among others.

We currently have a special offer running where you can book 2 spaces at a reduced rate of £200 (usual price £150 per place). This offer has now been extended until the 22nd January. Places are extremely limited and are selling fast. Booking early is advised to avoid disappoint.

For further information or to book a place email jack@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445.

Forthcoming Excitement… Self Harm Conference, From Harm to Hope, 1st March 2016.

Happy New Year and welcome to 2016 and with the New Year I wish to share my enthusiasm for March 1st, if there is any date to write in your diary it is this one. Mark your calendars, write in your dairies and tap into your smart phones and tablets, March 1st From Harm to Hope.

Come Tuesday 1st March Nottingham Conference Centre will be holding Harmless’ first national conference, From Harm to Hope. Suitably our conference is in line with Self harm awareness day and our aim is to drive change, raise awareness and share effective practise.

The day itself looks to be one of the most exciting events yet with various professionals coming from all over the country to speak, Dr Ellen Townsend, Dr Christabel Owens and Karen Lascelles are to name but a few.

To give you a small taster of what is to come Karen Lascelles, Fiona Brand and Charlotte Ball from Oxford Health NHS trust will be reflecting upon the successes, challenges and outcomes of how the self harm team in a busy city Emergency Department of a general hospital work collaboratively with staff and service users to develop a clinic focusing on prevention and problem solving. These speakers will be followed by a variety of interactive workshops in the afternoon.

During our lead up to the conference there will of course be lots of coverage on both our Facebook and Twitter sites. We would greatly appreciate your support in helping us to spread these links far and wide by re-tweeting and sharing on your own sites. We want to get as many people talking about Self Harm as possible, in order to promote better understanding and support.

So book a place and join us on March 1st for an innovative, thought provoking and inspiring day.

Contact: jack@harmless.org.uk

We look forward to seeing you there!

Self Harm Conference: January Sale – 2 for £200

Self Harm Conference: From Harm to Hope

Tuesday 1st March 2016

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

NEW YEAR LIMITED TIME OFFER

Two delegate Places for £200*

Places must be booked by 15th January 2016 to receive this offer.

 Contact jack@harmless.org.uk to book.

*Usual Price £150 per delegate place. A saving of £100 per two places. Price will rise to £150 per delegate after the offer has ended.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Regular Price £150 per delegate place.

 

What is the purpose of the conference?

The theme of our launch event conference is empowering communities through collaboration.

Harmless recognises that self harm effects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

We are happy to confirm that Time to Change will be joining us at our 1st national self harm conference and will be providing the opening remarks. Associate Professor Dr Ellen Townsend from the University of Nottingham will also be joining us and will be sharing current findings from the DoH funded Listen Up! Project looking at self harm in looked after children and young people.

Dr Christabel Owens, Senior Research Fellow from the University of Exeter, will be joining us to speak about children and young people’s experiences of accessing A&E and Karen Lascelles (Suicide Prevention Lead Nurse) and her team from Oxford NHS Team will be sharing their perspectives on brief interventions with those that self harm.

Keith Waters, Clinical Advisor (Suicide Prevention) at East Midlands Academic Health Science Network will be joining us and speaking alongside our CEO, Caroline Harroe, who will be encouraging a diverse and engaging programme for professionals and carers interested in the field of self harm to learn and benefit from current thinking, information, best practice and advice.

Marie Armstrong, Nurse Consultant to CAMHS (specialist self-harm team) will bring her expertise in working with young people that self harm and families and the programme is also extremely lucky to host our colleague Hayley Green from Write Minds, who will be running a spoken word workshop on the day to demonstrate the effectiveness of employing the arts in the treatment of self harm and mental health difficulties. Dr James Roe & Harriet Ball from the University of Nottingham will also be discussing the progress of their e-DASH: Depressions and self harm study.

 

Workshops:

  • Harmless – Sophie Allen: Building resilience – Brief interventions when working towards recovery.
  • Harmless – Sarah Kessling: Risk Assessment and Intervention for high risk groups.
  • Write Minds – Hayley Green: Unlocking the tales within: Explore the way writing and performance poetry can help give vulnerable people a voice.
  • Anne Garland: Listening without prejudice: making psychological sense of self-harm within a cognitive-behavioural formulation.
  • Marie Armstrong: The social context of young people and self-harm
  • Dr Ellen Townsend: Psychological factors associated with self-harm and suicidality, and interventions that promote recovery, especially in young people.
  • Self Injury Support: Supporting a diverse range of needs within one service model – how can we adapt services to support a wide range of clients with varying needs?
  • Keith Waters: Drawing from his experience on the NSPA, the multi-centre study for self harm & EMHSRN this workshop will demonstrate what we already know & demonstrate how existing data collected can help to inform responses
  • Self Harm Focus Group: Be Involved! Public Engagement in Self Harm Focus Group.
  • Hannah Heath: Co-creating a resource for the friends of those who self-harm: A collaborative enterprise.
  • Pam Burrows: How to Feel Good…even on a bad day.

Venue:

The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre. For directions please click here

Where can I find more information?

If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, or to book tickets, then please email jack@harmless.org.uk

Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 934 8445