In the News: Student debt worries causing depression and alcohol dependency

A Study carried out by YouGov has highlighted the fact that female students are more likely to have mental  health problems than males and that LGBT students have a high likelihood of developing issues compared to their non-LGBT counterpart.

Overall, more than a quarter (27%) of all students surveyed reported having a mental health problem of one type or another in the past year.

The study has added to the recent problem of rising mental health issues in students by highlighting depression, anxiety, and eating disorders as the three main challenges being faced by young people at university today.

For a significant proportion of respondents with issues, day-to-day tasks were difficult to see through; nearly half – 47 per cent – said they have trouble completing some daily tasks. Four per cent admitted to not being able to complete the most simple of tasks.

Leader of that study, Dr Thomas Richardson, described how the findings suggested “a vicious cycle” whereby anxiety and problem drinking “exacerbate financial difficulties,” which then go on to increase anxiety and alcohol intake. He said: “Interventions which tackle both difficulties at the same time are therefore most likely to be effective.”

Elaine Hindal, chief executive of Drinkaware, the alcohol education charity, acknowledged how alcohol can have a temporary, positive impact on mood, but warned: “Regular, excessive drinking can have long-term implications for students’ mental health.”

“Alcohol is a depressant and can disrupt the delicate balance of chemicals that affect mood. This can lead to increased anxiety and stress, and even depression.

To read the full article, please click this link : http://www.independent.co.uk/student/student-life/health/mental-health-depression-anxiety-at-university-affecting-female-lgbt-students-a7184816.html

If you would like help and support come and join us for our ‘Drop in ‘Sessions which are friendly and welcoming, have a chat and tea or coffee in a relaxed atmosphere and meet our approachable staff.

Our next drop in dates are:

  • Adults Drop in Wednesday 17th August 4.30 – 5.30 pm for adults (18 + yrs)
  • Young Person Drop in Thursday 25th August 4.30 – 5.30 pm aged (11 – 21 yrs)

Calling all Hospital Staff

 

Whilst attending the Nottingham University Conference: Responding effectively to self harm and suicidality, Keith Hawton, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Centre for Suicide Research, discussed the impact of training on hospital staff.

He highlighted how the NICE guidelines around effective support for those who self harm recommend training for all.  Saunders at al. (2012) identified that training has significant improvements on attitudes and confidence in hospital staff. The study also highlighted how more formal and interactive training was most successful in changing attitudes.

Professor Hawton went on to present how training should take shape, training needs to be:

Focused on skills and knowledge

Interactive

Involve service users

Repeated regularly

Evaluated for behavioural change

At Harmless, we embrace the challenges that hospital staff face and spend quality time supporting everyone in hospital settings to improve their confidence and skills. But don’t rely on what we have to say here are what some of our delegates have said about our training…

“Excellent training that has made me think ‘outside the box’ regarding self harm. Would highly recommend this training. Trainer was absolutely fantastic.”

“Fantastic training day. Makes me feel more confident as a practitioner.”

“The whole session was delivered in an enthusiastic and knowledgeable manner. Probably the best training session I have experienced in over 25 years of working with young people.”

For more information email: training@harmless.org.uk

The importance of training…in relation to responding effectively to self harm and suicidality

How often have you found yourself saying these following statements, or heard someone saying them, in relation to training opportunities…

“Too busy!”
“Not enough time!”
“Not my responsibility!”

Dr. Eoin Galavan the Senior Clinical and Counselling Psychologist in the HSE, North Dublin Adult Mental Health Services was speaking about this very point at yesterday’s conference in Nottingham University.

Dr. Galavan works with suicidal individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds on a daily basis and he made many interesting and vital points about how to support self harm and suicidality effectively. However, one important point he made was the significance of training.

Many recommendations highlight how essential it is that everyone is trained appropriately to be able to respond and support individuals in distress. As a trainer myself I spend most of my days promoting this very message! However, continually you will find the same rebuffs, “I’m too busy…I don’t have the time…it’s not relevant to what I do.” So my message today is simply this…

To improve email training@harmless.org.uk

At Harmless we offer bespoke training to meet your needs so you can have fewer squares and more circles! 

Our CEO, Caroline Harroe, speaking at Responding effectively to self harm and suicidality conference in Nottingham

This afternoon Harmless’ CEO, Caroline Harroe, will be speaking at the Responding effectively to self harm and suicidality conference at the University of Nottingham. She will be presenting alongside some of the country’s leading academics along with Professor David Jobes who has travels all the way from Washington DC in the USA to speak about the Innovations in Clinical Suicidology. We are honoured to be a part of this conference.

The conference will be taking place over the next two days with today’s session entitled a ‘Symposium on interventions and therapeutic approaches for self-harm and suicidality. What works?’ The symposium is open to anyone with an interest in treatment/recovery/prevention in relation to self-harm and suicidality.

Caroline will be speaking about the reality of delivering self harm and suicide interventions from a service user perspective and examining how the system can start functioning together as a whole.

Would you like to work for Harmless and the Let’s Talk Training Team?

We are currently recruiting for a number of positions within the organisation to join our Let’s Talk Training team on a sessional basis. These include:

Self Harm and Suicide Prevention Trainer (Sessional)

ASIST / MHFA Trainer (Bank Staff)

For an application form and job description, or for more information please email info@harmless.org.uk or call 01159 348445 (admin line only). Please include the job title you are applying for in your email.

Application closing date(s) Friday 16th September 2016 at 5pm.

Interviews to be held w/c 26th September 2016.

 

 

JOB TITLE: Self Harm and Suicide Prevention Trainer
Hours: Sessional basis
Pay:

  • £150 – £200 per Full Day (Specialist Harmless Training)  
  • £100 – £150 per Half Day (Specialist Harmless Training) 
  • ASIST/MHFA qualified Trainers – Negotiable (Depending on experience)    

IMPORTANT:  FULL DRIVERS LICENSE AND OWN CAR ESSENTIAL FOR THE ROLE

DUTIES AND KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Deliver high quality and professional training on behalf of Harmless and its associated projects to external parties including (but not limited to) external organisations, school, professionals and carers.
  • Delivery of a range of training packages including (but not limited to) PSHE workshops, specialist workshops and two day, full day and half day specialist sessions on the themes of Mental Health, Self Harm & Suicide.
  • A willingness to offer personal experience during training delivery  by sharing own experiences of distress (and/or self harm) and recovery (in line with Harmless’ service user led ethos)
  • Represent Harmless in a professional manner at all times
  • Deliver training against agreed learning outcomes
  • Develop and maintain training content in line with changes in the field and to the highest standard upon negotiation with the Harmless Management Team
  • Maintain excellent professional relationships with delegates and/or organisations with a view to secure future training opportunities
  • Be an integral part of the booking process with support from the administration team
  • To ensure all data collection tools are used to monitor and improve upon training delivery
  • Ensure training materials are appropriate for delegates requirements
  • Report to Harmless management regularly about the progress of training and address any issues that may arise, recording relevant statistics where required.
  • Promote the work of Harmless in a positive manner and recommend resources and alternative training opportunities where possible.
  • Maintain excellent relationships with delegates and/or organisations before, during and after training delivery
  • To work with Harmless management in continuously improving Harmless’ training packages including (but not limited to) current content, delivery methods, course materials and handouts, booking process.
  • To work with Harmless management in designing and delivering new training packages in order to meet current demands in training, compete with other organisations and increase revenue.
  • To be aware of safeguarding issues that may arise and follow Harmless protocol in managing this.

JOB TITLE: ASIST Trainer / MHFA Trainer
Hours: Bank Staff
Pay: Negotiable (Depending on experience)    

IMPORTANT:  FULL DRIVERS LICENSE AND OWN CAR ESSENTIAL FOR THE ROLE

This role will be ideal for those who have recently qualified to become ASIST and MHFA instructors.

DUTIES AND KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Deliver ASIST and/or MHFA training on behalf of Harmless and its associated projects to external parties including (but not limited to) external organisations, school, professionals and carers.
  • A willingness to offer personal experience during training delivery  by sharing own experiences of distress (and/or self harm) and recovery (in line with Harmless’ service user led ethos)
  • A willingness to travel (nationwide) with occasional overnight stay as required.
  • Represent Harmless in a professional manner at all times
  • Deliver training against agreed learning outcomes
  • Develop and maintain training content in line with changes in the field and to the highest standard upon negotiation with the Harmless Management Team
  • Maintain excellent professional relationships with delegates and/or organisations with a view to secure future training opportunities
  • Be an integral part of the booking process with support from the administration team
  • To ensure all data collection tools are used to monitor and improve upon training delivery
  • Ensure training materials are appropriate for delegates requirements
  • Report to Harmless management regularly about the progress of training and address any issues that may arise, recording relevant statistics where required.
  • Promote the work of Harmless in a positive manner and recommend resources and alternative training opportunities where possible.
  • Maintain excellent relationships with delegates and/or organisations before, during and after training delivery
  • To work with Harmless management in continuously improving Harmless’ training packages including (but not limited to) current content, delivery methods, course materials and handouts, booking process.
  • To work with Harmless management in designing and delivering new training packages in order to meet current demands in training, compete with other organisations and increase revenue.
  • To be aware of safeguarding issues that may arise and follow Harmless protocol in managing this.

 

World Suicide Prevention Day: 10th September 2016

In the UK in 2014, 6122 people died by suicide

It is estimated that 1 in 20 people have thoughts of suicide at some point in their life.

How many people do you walk past, or see every day? 80, 100, 200? To think that out of these up to 10 of these people could be having thoughts of suicide or have had thoughts previously is really quite startling!

It is quite possible, you know someone that has had thoughts of suicide or been affected by suicide

Do you have the skills and confidence to respond to thoughts of suicide?

Do you have the skills and confidence to complete an intervention with a person at risk of suicide?

Want to learn lifesaving skills?

To coincide with World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD) Harmless will be delivering;

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)

 27th and 28th September 2016 £150

ASIST is a 2 day intensive training programme that teaches participants life assisting skills to be able to complete an intervention with a person at risk.

The focus of this is to identify what can be done to keep a person ‘safe for now’ while longer term safety measures are explored. It uses a framework that supports the caregiver to work through an intervention and create a safety plan.

Responding and supporting someone at risk of suicide can be extremely distressing and anxiety provoking. ASIST can give you the confidence to respond to these distressing disclosures and most importantly, teaches us that by providing that little bit of hope to a person at risk, that recovery is possible and indeed, very likely.

Email: training@harmless.org.uk

Call: 0115 934 8445

Delivery location will be within Nottingham City 

In the News: A country boy’s story about coming out: self-harm, suicide and Safe Schools

I didn’t even know what “gay” was until I was harassed for having it. Gay boy. Dirty sanchez. Fancy pants. Faggot. Gay, I soon learnt, was undesirable.

My family lived in a town called Waaia, a hamlet near Shepparton, which in 2015 had the lowest average annual income in Victoria (just $27,627). Each weekday, I would travel by bus to and from the larger town of Numurkah to attend a public secondary college.

I was different. Not only was this made clear to me in derogatory terms, but I also knew I was different – in the way I spoke, the way I held my body. These demarcated me. During those years, I didn’t understand why my eyes would move to the shower block at the gym and I was too afraid to ask. And so, before each PE class, I changed in a toilet cubicle, dodging loo paper, puddles of urine and, once, a condom.

The only difference between me and a person who identifies as heterosexual is the people each of us sleeps with

Ten years later, homophobia is still common in Australia. I didn’t feel safe enough to come out until after I’d left rural Victoria, yet to this day I continue to encounter scorn – in the media, from our federal government, on the street – because my eyes are drawn to men.

For the full story:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jul/09/a-country-boys-story-about-coming-out-self-harm-suicide-and-safe-schools