£25 saves a life? Wanna be a life saver? 

FACT: £25 can save a life
FACT: 6,188 suicides were reported 2015

MYTH: Talking about suicide escalates risk of suicide
FACT: For every 1 woman 3 men take their lives

MYTH: Someone who talks about wanting to take their life won’t go through with it
FACT: The Tomorrow Project & Harmless save lives
FACT: £25 = one crisis session
Please save a life today and donate to Harmless click here to go to our local giving page: https://localgiving.org/harmless

World Suicide Prevention Day – #takeaminute #savealife

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day. This is a day that honours suicide prevention work across the globe and can give us all a moment to stop and think what we each have to contribute to suicide prevention. 

Each year, the International Association for Suicide Prevention sets a theme for the day; this year is #takeaminute. 

We often think that life saving efforts come from elaborate interventions. If you thought this was the case- you’d be wrong. Suicide prevention is everyone’s business… change can happen in a moment – a show of human kindness, a cups of tea, a chat, a hug, or a moment of self care. What can you do in a minute that could change everything for someone else or for yourself?

We’re borrowing this next bit from a supportive follower of our work…

‘In 2015 6,188 people died by suicide 

In 2015 1,732 people died in a road accident 

Surprised? 

How many times do we say ‘drive carefully’? Its relatively easy right and trips off the tongue. 

How many times do we say ‘are you ok?’ and wait long enough to hear what that person really says, or when they say ‘fine’ be curious and ask a few more questions? 

New research this year by De Cou et al (2017) has evidenced that asking people outright if they are having suicidal thoughts does NOT make them more likely to do anything or make them feel worse. Don’t be afraid to ask.’

Don’t be afraid to listen to the answer – you could be the difference between life and death for someone you know and love. 

Tell us how you’re going to spend your minute wisely.

#takeaminute #savealife

Light a Candle: World Suicide Prevention Day – 10 September 2017

Light a Candle near a Window at 8 PM to show your support for suicide prevention, to remember a lost loved one, and for the survivors of suicide.

Every year, more than 800,000 people die by suicide and up to 25 times as many make a suicide attempt. Behind these statistics are the individual stories of those who have, for many different reasons, questioned the value of their own lives.

Each one of these individuals is part of a community. Some may be well linked in to this community, and have a network of family, friends and work colleagues or school mates. Others may be less well connected, and some may be quite isolated. Regardless of the circumstances, communities have an important role to play in supporting those who are vulnerable.

This sentiment is reflected in the theme of the 2017 World Suicide Prevention Day: ‘Take a minute, change a life.’ As members of communities, it is our responsibility to look out for those who may be struggling, check in with them, and encourage them to tell their story in their own way and at their own pace. Offering a gentle word of support and listening in a non-judgmental way can make all the difference.

Life is precious and sometimes precarious. Taking a minute to reach out to someone – a complete stranger r close family member or friend – can change the course of their life.

2017 marks the 15th World Suicide Prevention Day. The day was first recognised in 2003, as an initiative of the International Association for Suicide Prevention and endorsed by the World Health Organization. World Suicide Prevention Day takes place each year on September 10.

On September 10, join with others around the world who are working towards the common goal of preventing suicide. Show your support by taking part in our Cycle Around the Globe campaign aimed at raising awareness through community action. Find out what local activities have been scheduled as well – or initiate one yourself!

Finally, if there is anyone you are concerned about, take a minute to check in with them. It could change their life.

Today we are hosting an event at The Sir Colin Campbell building exploring The Tomorrow Projects pathways, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day on September the 10th, 2017.

Today we are hosting an event exploring suicide prevention pathways, two days before World Suicide Prevention Day, 2017. Delegates have the opportunity to hear about our life saving work, as well as stories directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service.

The day presents workshops on suicide crisis intervention and an introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide.

Suicide remains a socially taboo subject, with The Tomorrow Project is paving the way on challenging the stigma in this field. An estimated 1 in 20 people contemplate suicide every year, thoughts of suicide are far more common than we might like to believe with attempts 40-100 times more common than deaths by suicide.

Penny Johnson, who lost her son to suicide and says: “The Tomorrow Project is so vital in so many ways. Before my son died, we tried to get him help via the NHS only to be turned away. I pleaded with them to help us, but they said that they couldn’t unless Jamie was the one asking for help but in October, 2012, Jamie took his own life. My family have been in turmoil ever since, each of us needing help in our own way and The Tomorrow Project has been there for us. I don’t know how we would have survived without them.”

A further ticketed event will be held on the evening of the 7th of October at Ruddington Grange in Nottingham celebrating the work and raising funds for the continuation of life saving work, with a drinks reception, dinner, live music and auction. Tickets available now via www.harmless.org.uk/store

Suicide Prevention Service, The Tomorrow Project, hosts an event on 8th September exploring The Tomorrow Projects pathways, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day on September the 10th, 2017.

The Tomorrow Project will be hosting an event exploring the suicide prevention pathways, two days before World Suicide Prevention Day, 2017. Delegates will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories. The Tomorrow Project was established in South Nottinghamshire in 2012 after there were a number of deaths to suicide in a local community. By galvanising local support, bereaved families and professionals, The Tomorrow project was established to deliver services and support to reach people in distress and reduce suicide.

The Tomorrow project will also be hosting an introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide. This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: Identifying risk factors, understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools, establishing current emotional states & behaviours and reviewing & revisiting risk.

Whilst there has been significant attention paid locally and nationally to suicide prevention, it remains a very specialist and under funded piece of work.

The bereaved by suicide also remain an overlooked group. These individuals are at an 80% increased chance of unemployment and a 1 in 10 chance of attempting suicide.

When compared with people bereaved through other causes, those bereaved by suicide are at an increased risk of suicide, psychiatric admission and depression, as well as suicide attempt and poor social functioning.

Penny Johnson, a bereaved mother, lost her son to suicide and says: “The Tomorrow Project is so vital in so many ways. Before my son died, we tried to get him help via the NHS only to be turned away because Jamie was over 18. I pleaded with them to help us, but they said that they couldn’t unless Jamie was the one asking for help but in October, 2012, Jamie took his own life. My family have been in turmoil ever since, each of us needing help in our own way and The Tomorrow Project has been there for us. I don’t know how we would have survived without them.”

The Tomorrow Project’s event is to be held at The Sir Collin Campbell building, September 8th 2017, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day. The team are incredibly excited to be hosting the event and look forward to meeting all attendees tomorrow.

A further ticketed event will be held on the evening of the 7th October at Ruddington Grange in Nottingham to celebrate the work and to raise money for the continuation of life saving work, with a drinks reception, dinner, live music and auction.

Tickets available now via: http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/Harmless-Celebration-2017

The Tomorrow Project – General Population Survey

The Tomorrow Project are currently asking for members of the general population to take part in the survey below. This is important as it will allow the team to collect a snapshot of data from the general population in order to draw comparisons against those who are currently experiencing suicide crisis.

The survey will only take a few minutes to complete and we appreciate you taking the time to do so.

Create your survey with SurveyMonkey

In the News: Police dealing with record level of phone calls on mental health

Britain’s biggest police force received a phone call relating to mental health every five minutes last year, an escalating level of demand caused by NHS services struggling to cope.

The number of calls handled by the Metropolitan police in which someone was concerned about a person’s mental health hit a record 115,000 in the last year: on average 315 a day, or about 13 an hour.

Volumes have grown by nearly a third since 2011-12, according to data released under freedom of information legislation, and officers fear the demand for help from the public will continue to increase.

One senior police officer told the Guardian a reduction in the ability to cope of NHS mental health services was a key factor in the rise in mental health calls to the police, and it was a national trend.

Insp Michael Brown, mental health coordinator for the College of Policing, said police had become better at recording such calls but this could not account for the big rise.

“We know there is more demand on NHS mental health services and their funding has been cut,” he said.

Commander Richard Smith, head of safeguarding at the Met, said: “Based on current trends, section 136 demand is set to double in London in the next 10 years as it’s increasing by approximately 10% each year.”

Smith added: “The issues we deal with include those with mental ill health who are involved in crime as victims or suspects as well as people who are in crisis in their home or in a public place.”

Nationally, police believe a significant number of those about whom they get calls are already under the care of NHS mental health services, or have been, which is beginning to have an effect on policing.

In West Yorkshire, mental health nurses are being employed in two custody suites to help with people brought in by officers. The force says the mental health incidents it deals with every month have risen to 1,300, up from 850 two years ago.

Brown added that so called “street triage projects” across Britain, where calls are attended by a mental health expert and a police officer, showed that in the majority of cases, police were not needed to resolve the problem.

In Lincolnshire, mental health nurses will now work in the police control room to give clinical advice to police dealing with callers.

The Met figures were obtained by the Labour party under freedom of information legislation. The full figures show that in the 12 months up to 20 July 2017, the Met received 115,000 calls flagged up on its systems as regarding mental health, up 33% on the volume of calls received in 2011-12.

Louise Haigh, the shadow police minister, said: “The dismantling of vital early intervention services forces those with mental health issues on to lengthy waiting lists.

“In desperation or in crisis, they will turn to the police, who are acting as the service of last resort, a role they are wholly unequipped for.

“While facing a savage cut in numbers, the police are increasingly being asked to pick up the pieces of a scandalous lack of mental health provision. Incidents involving mental health are at record highs as police resilience reaches rock bottom.

“The result is genuinely frightening and these figures should act as a wake-up call for the government.”

A Department of Health spokesperson said: “Everyone should be able to access the mental health support they need. We have made major improvements in recent years, including setting up the first ever access and waiting standards for mental health and increasing mental health spending year on year to a record £11.6 billion in 2016/17.

For the full article: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/aug/28/police-phone-calls-mental-health-nhs