Grow your Tenner 2018 – Support us with a monthly donation
 
LocalGiving have announced their 2018 grow your tenner campaign. Here’s how it works…
 
 
We are delighted to announce that this year’s Grow Your Tenner campaign will launch at 10am on Tuesday 11th December 2018. The campaign will run until the match funding is fully allocated or 12am on Thursday the 10th January – whichever comes first.
This year we are putting a particular emphasis on encouraging people to become long term supporters of their local charities.
 
With this in mind, we will match monthly donations for a full 6 months for donors who set up a direct debit to a Localgiving member for a year.
We have a match fund pot of £100,000 and all Localgiving members are eligible to take part.
 
This is the seventh consecutive year of Grow Your Tenner – the campaign that turns your tenners into twenties. Since 2012 Grow Your Tenner has raised close to £7 million for local charities and community groups across the UK.
 
Link to campaign: https://localgiving.org/what-we-do/campaigns/grow-your-tenner?utm_source=VCO+Accounts+Salesforce+Master+List&utm_campaign=0d84036170-Members+newsletter+28.11.18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6b940e0f40-0d84036170-%5BLIST_EMAIL_ID%5D&ct=t%28Members+newsletter+28.11.18%29

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

Harmless tree of hope

Here at Harmless we have a very special Christmas tree ‘Harmless tree of Hope’. We would love for all our wonderful supporters, new and old, to send in your hopes for 2019.

Each hope will be carefully made onto a special paper decoration by our lovely Harmless Christmas elves, and then added to our tree of hope.

If you would like to add a hope to our tree you can do so by sending a Facebook message, calling, emailing or simply filling in a form in our Harmless HQ (in the entrance!) info@harmless.org.uk, 01158800280.

Each hope will be completely anonymous and will be placed on our extra special Christmas tree.

Please send us your hopes by Wednesday 5th December 2018.

*Hopes will be checked for appropriateness according to our guidelines.

We can’t wait to see them all

In the News: 55% of users say wearable tech improves their mental health

 
More than half of UK consumers who wear smartwatches or fitness bands believe the devices have improved their mental health, research suggests.
 
Some 55% of consumers who use the devices believe they have gone beyond improving their fitness and also benefited their mental health, with the figure rising to 61% of 16 to 34-year-olds, the study by analysts Mintel indicates.
 
Meanwhile, 72% of wearable fitness tracker users say their device has helped improve their physical health and 71% say they exercise more often since buying their gadget.
 
Six in 10 (59%) of those who own the devices use them daily, and 18% use them three to six days a week, the survey found. Just 7% stopped using the gadgets after buying one.
 
Andrew Moss, technology analyst at Mintel, said: “Wrist-worn technology began with a fitness focus and an emphasis on tracking speed, distance and calories, but now the technology has moved beyond these initial functions.
 
“While quantifying improvements in this area is difficult, Brits feel strongly that this technology can help improve their mental health. This perception is likely to be the result of an increased focus on physical health amongst device owners, as improvements here can have a knock-on effect on mental health and overall well-being.
 
“However, these devices also offer more concrete benefits by allowing users to track sleep and stress levels, and by supporting participation in mindfulness and calming exercises.”
 
Just under one in five Britons (18%) now owns a fitness band or sports watch, up from 14% in June last year, with ownership peaking among consumers aged 25 to 34.
 
About 11% own a smartwatch, up from 9% in June 2017, although men are almost twice as likely as women to wear one.
 
Mintel forecasts that sales of wrist-worn devices will hit 4.2 million this year, up from just under four million last year.
 
Mintel surveyed 2,000 internet users aged 16 and over in September.
 
Link to original blog: https://www.itv.com/news/2018-11-15/55-of-users-say-wearable-tech-improves-their-mental-health/

Send a card, save a life!

Help support vital self harm and suicide prevention services by sending a festive card this holiday season!

Premium quality cards come in packs of 8 with 2 designs and self seal envelopes.

£4 per pack

All the money raised will go directly towards supporting the ongoing work of Harmless and The Tomorrow Project and saving lives.

Buy yours in our online store: www.harmless.org.uk/store/Christmas-cards

 

In the News: One in four young women struggling

Nearly one in four young women has a mental illness, with emotional problems such as depression and anxiety the most common, figures for England show.

The official NHS report found young women aged 17 to 19 were twice as likely as young men to have problems, with 23.9% reporting a disorder.

Problems are less common in younger age groups, but are rising, albeit slowly.

In children aged five to 15, one in nine had a disorder, up from one in 10 when the review was done 13 years ago.

The findings are based on a survey of more than 9,000 young people.

The results have been gathered by statistics body NHS Digital and assessed by experts to try to ensure only diagnosable conditions are included.

Dr Bernadka Dubicka, of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said the numbers of young women with problems was “alarming”.

She said body image pressures, exam stress and the negative effects of social media may all affect girls disproportionately, while they were also more likely to be victims of abuse and sexual assault.

“We can only speculate. We still do not fully understand this – all we know is that we see more girls in our clinics.

“We have to make sure services are available for them.”

 

It comes as the Children’s Commissioner for England warned there was a “vast gap” in NHS mental health support.

Anne Longfield’s report criticised slow progress made in improving specialist community services for children.

She said waiting times were too long and she was concerned about numbers being rejected by services in some areas.

Nearly half of those in their late teens with mental health problems had self-harmed or attempted suicide. For younger teens it was about a quarter.

 

Emma Blezard, 18, says her mental health problems have robbed her of her teenage years.

She started experiencing difficulties when she was 13, suffering from anxiety and panic attacks before developing an eating disorder.

It was a year before she let on to her parents. She ended up having suicidal thoughts and was sectioned in hospital at one point.

“I’ve missed so much of my life because of this illness – I’ve lost friends, I’ve missed birthday, holidays.

“I wish I could do things over.”

Even when she was receiving treatment, she felt she did not deserve it.

“I became really isolated. At school I spent a lot of time out of lessons with the nurse. It was very difficult.”

She has travelled all over the country for treatment and says she still struggles, although her problems are more manageable now.

“I don’t think they will ever go away.”

It may be a factor, although it is hard to tell.

The NHS Digital review found children aged 11 to 19 with a mental health problem were more likely to use social media.

Nearly a third of them spent over four hours a day on social media.

Those who did not have a mental health problem were two to three times less likely to spend that amount of time on it.

The young people with mental health problems were more likely to say their mood was affected by the number of “likes” they got and they were also more likely to compare themselves to others on social media.

The report cited cyber-bullying as an issue too.

But while this does suggest social media can have a negative impact, it does not prove it is to blame.

People with mental health problems may be just more likely to find themselves on it, rather than it causing their problems in the first place. Indeed, they could even be using social media for support.

Adolescence is key

The majority of problems reported, particularly in the older age groups, are linked to emotional disorders.

These are on the rise, whereas the other disorders they looked at – behavioural and hyperactivity – have remained relatively stable over time.

University College London psychiatrist Dr Michael Bloomfield said: “Adolescence is a critical period for a person’s development, particularly as our brains go through important changes during our teenage years.

“Since prevention is better than cure, it is really important for all of us in society to understand together why this is and start reducing the rates of mental disorders in young people.”

How many children get help?

The NHS is only treating a fraction of the young people who have problems.

The Children’s Commissioner’s analysis of NHS figures from 2017-18 show that 325,000 children were treated by community services, while there are another 5,000 in hospital.

That is fewer than 3% of the population.

The figures showed that more than a third of young people referred to community services were turned away.

This could be because their needs were not severe enough to need help and could be dealt with through other services, such as in school or by charities and council social care teams.

But Ms Longfield said she was concerned children were getting turned away because services simply did not have time to see them.

Her report also raised concerns about waiting times. Just under half of people who received treatment after a referral in 2017-18 had waited longer than six weeks. The average waiting time was nearly two months.

What needs to happen?

The commissioner believes children’s services are under-funded. Around £700m is spent on child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and eating disorders support.

By comparison, services for adults receive 15 times more despite children representing 20% of the population.

The commissioner said an extra £1.7bn would need to be invested to bring children’s services in line.

She said this could help pay for more early help by funding NHS counsellors in schools for example.

Emma Thomas, chief executive of the Young Minds charity, said there was a lack of support for children.

She said the charity gets “calls every day” about children who are waiting for help or have been denied help.

“This can have devastating consequences – in some cases, children start to self-harm, become suicidal or drop out of school while waiting for the help they need.”

She agreed early intervention and better funding were essential.

 

What is the government doing?

Both NHS England and the Department of Health and Social Care have made improving children’s mental health care a priority.

In fact, the commissioner’s report noted that investment was increasing and there had been good progress in terms of tackling eating disorders with new services and strict targets for access.

Last month, in his Budget, the chancellor announced at least £2bn of the extra £20bn earmarked for the NHS by 2023 would go on mental health.

A new four-week target for access to CAMHS is also going to be piloted soon and NHS England has promised another 70,000 children will be able to access support in the coming years.

National mental health director Claire Murdoch said the scale of the problem identified by NHS Digital showed the importance of “ramping up” access to services.

She said the NHS long-term plan, due out soon, would set out more details about future investment.

“Everyone who works with children and young people, whether in the public, private or voluntary sector, has to play their part if we are to protect young people’s mental wellbeing.”

Ministers have also being putting pressure on social media firms to do more about cyber-bullying and aggressive behaviour online.

One option being considered is a new regulator for the internet.

 

Link to original blog: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46295719

 

 

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

New Training Dates: Book now!

New training dates released:
– Self Harm & Suicide Prevention Training on 6th December 2018
– Mental Health Training on 12th February 2019
– Self Harm Training on 11th March 2019

To book: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/harmless-lets-talk-training-14795237737

For more info please contact training@harmless.org.uk or phone 0115 880 0281

A big thank you to Children In Need from Harmless for funding our young people self harm and suicide prevention support services.

Tonight (Friday 16th November 2018) sees the return of BBC Children in Need’s appeal show – an annual event which looks to raise money that will be used to make a real difference to the lives of disadvantaged children across the UK.

The show kicks off with a performance from the cast of the West End musicals School of Rock and Everybody’s Talking About Jamie, before the The Children’s Choir sing The Greatest Showman hit A Million Dreams in unison with children’s choirs across the nation in moving scenes.

Graham Norton and Mel Giedroyc then take the reins, overseeing a performance from the EastEnders cast putting on a spectacle in Albert Square – including Jessie Wallace belting out Frozen’s Let It Go.

Little Mix, Alfie Boe and Sheridan Smith will also be on hand to give some Children in Need project workers a surprise as well as much more!

Here is a short testimony written by a young person who has received support services from Harmless funded by CIN:

“Joining Harmless a few month ago, I couldn’t speak about my feelings, but with all the support I have had I am back to the person I wanted to be. Everyone has been absolutely amazing and helped me get through every hurdle and difficulty that has come my way. I have learnt different types of stress relief techniques and how to deal with stress in any situation. Brilliant team and I’m lucky and thankful for everything they have done for me.”

Everyone at Harmless would like to thank Children in Need and their wonderful team for the continued support that they have given to us and the children and young people that access our support service(s). We wish everyone all the best and hope that they have another record breaking evening.

To view an animation created by BBC Children in Need and Harmless, please click Bronwyn’s Story.

Watch the Appeal Show across BBC1 and BBC2 from 7:30pm on Friday 16th November

You can donate to Children in Need by clicking here

To learn more about our self harm support services, please contact Harmless by emailing info@harmless.org.uk