From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Nav Kapur
Professor of Psychiatry and Population Health Biography
 
Nav Kapur is Professor of Psychiatry and Population Health at the University of Manchester, UK, and an Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust. He is Head of Research at the Centre for Mental Health and Safety in the University of Manchester and leads the suicide work programme of the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide which collects data on all suicide deaths among people in contact with health services in the UK. He was Chair of the Guideline Development Group for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) self-harm guidelines (longer term management) and also chaired the Quality Standards for self-harm.
 
He is currently chairing the NICE guidelines for depression in adults and is topic expert on the NICE guidelines for suicide prevention in the community. He also chairs the Health Education England/Royal College of Psychiatrists group developing core competencies for clinical staff in the assessment of self-harm and suicidal ideas.
He is a member of the Department of Health’s (England) National Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group. He has published extensively on suicide and self-harm with much of his research focussing on how health services might best contribute to suicide prevention.
 
#HarmtoHope
 
As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
 
Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.
 
This years theme is: Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.

Harm to Hope conference

Last chance to buy tickets for our Harm to Hope conference, Friday 1st March. Tickets are selling fast and the event is just round the corner!
 
Purchase tickets soon to avoid missing out on an incredible CPD accredited conference, with a wealth of expertise and practical skills.
 
This years theme is: Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.
Friday 1st March 2019
£150 per delegate place*
or
2 delegate places for £200*
 
The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.
 
Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
· Collaborative partnership,
· Service user representation,
· Effective practice,
· Driving change &
· Overcoming stigma and discrimination.
 
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.
 
Speakers:
Prof. Nav Kapur
Dr Alys Cole-King
Prof. Siobhan O’Neill
Dr Sarah Cassidy
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre.
 
Where can I find more information?
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280
 
Tickets available here http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Keith Waters, Director of the Centre for Self-harm and Suicide Prevention Research, Derbyshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

Keith Waters has over 25 years of clinical experience in Liaison psychiatry over 30 years with self-harm and suicide prevention an area of special interest and approaching 40 years of NHS working. Was awarded an Honorary Research Fellowship by Derbyshire Healthcare Foundation Trust in 2013, is joint lead for the Derby site of the Multicentre Study of self-harm in England, Clinical director for self-harm and suicide prevention for the Trust and has a seat on the National Suicide Prevention Alliance steering group.

He has been the Regional Suicide Prevention manager then Clinical Advisor for Suicide Prevention with the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network. He is also an experienced trainer, facilitator and presenter, including as consultant trainer for STORM Skills Training, having helped develop and deliver the SAPT (Suicide Awareness Partnership Training) program across the East Midlands; and as a Primary Trainer for Connecting with People. Keith is joint author on numerous published research works, chapters in clinical text books on self-harm and suicide prevention and has contributed to policy and practice guidance.
Almost from Harmlessness’ inception Keith has maintained a close, active and supportive contact with Harmless and holds in great admiration what they have and are achieving. Keith would like to add that chair today is a privilege for him and would like to extend thanks to harmless for the invitation and would also like to thank the delegates, workshop facilitators and speakers for devoting time for today.

#HarmtoHope

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

This years theme is: Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Dr Alys Cole-King
 
Dr Alys Cole-King is the first person from the UK to be awarded the Ringel Service Award from the International Association for Suicide Prevention. She was named one of the most influential women in medicine by the Medical Women’s Journal and has been profiled in the Guardian, Lancet and the Psychiatrist in recognition of work with policy makers, medical royal colleges, people with lived experience, voluntary bodies and academics. Alys Cole-King is a Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist who maintains a clinical and public health role within the NHS. She promotes the need for compassion, collaboration, improved governance and promotes a common language to ensure an improved and more integrated response to people at risk of suicide. A contributor to the All Party Parliamentary
 
Group for Suicide and Self harm Prevention, Alys is also on the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Mental Health Training Advisory Group, and has contributed to their curriculum. Alys has led the development of the Connecting with People Programme and the Suicide Assessment Framework E-Tool (SAFETool). This approach is based on more than 25 years clinical experience, a thorough review of published evidence and a full time research project using psychological autopsy technique to investigate factors relating to episodes of self harm or suicide attempts in patients under the care of mental health teams. Alys led the development of StayingSafe.net, 4Mental Health’s innovative free digital solution to share compassion, hope and equip people to make a Safety Plan.
 
Alys is a primary author of a numerous papers, book chapters, webinars, podcasts, blogs and self-help resources on suicide and self-harm prevention, Alys has also contributed to the RCGP e-learning module on suicide prevention, is updating the BMJ Best Practice module on suicide and delivered a BMJ Masterclass Webinar on suicide mitigation. Alys is a reviewer for several journals and sits on the international Expert Reference group advising Griffiths University academics, a WHO Collaborating Centre on responding to professionals who have experienced the suicide of a patient. Alys works with the media (film, radio and newspapers) to ensure a safe and compassionate public health message of suicide prevention.
 
@AlysColeKing
#HarmtoHope
 
As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
 
Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.
 
This years theme is: Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.

In the News: How bosses can reduce stigma around mental health at work

Experts tell us that one in four adults will struggle with a mental health issue during his or her lifetime. At work, those suffering — from clinical conditions or more minor ones — often hide it for fear that they may face discrimination from peers or even bosses. These stigmas can and must be overcome. But it takes more than policies set at the top. It also requires empathetic action from managers on the ground.
 
We count ourselves among those who have wrestled with mental health challenges. One morning a few years ago, in the midst of a successful year, Jen couldn’t get out of bed. As a driven professional, she had ignored all the warning signs that she was experiencing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). But her mentor, Diana, could see something was wrong, and when Jen couldn’t come to work, the gravity of the situation became even clearer. In the ensuing weeks, we worked together to get Jen the help she needed.
Diana understood Jen’s struggles because she had been there, too — not with PTSD but with anxiety. As the mother of adult triplets with autism and a busy job, she’d often had difficulty managing things in her own life.
Throughout both of our careers, we have moved across the spectrum of mental health from thriving to barely hanging on, and somewhere in between. What we’ve learned through our own experiences is how much managerial support matters.
 
When bosses understand mental health issues — and how to respond to them — it can make all the difference for an employee professionally and personally. This involves taking notice, offering a helping hand, and saying “I’m here, I have your back, you are not alone.”
 
That’s exactly what Jen said when a coworker told her that he was grappling with anxiety; it had gotten to the point where it was starting to impact his work and his relationships at home. He came to her because she’d been open about her own struggles. She listened to him, worked to understand what accommodations he needed, and told him about available resources, such as Employee Assistance Programs. Then she continued to check in to see he was getting support he needed and make it clear that she and others were there to help.
 
How do you learn or teach the people on your team to address colleagues’ or direct reports’ mental health issues in the same way? Here are five ways managers can help drive a more empathetic culture:
Pay attention to language. We all need to be aware of the words we use that can contribute to stigmatizing mental health issues: “Mr. OCD is at it again — organizing everything.” “She’s totally schizo today!” “He is being so bi-polar this week — one minute he’s up, the next he’s down.” We’ve heard comments like these, maybe even made them ourselves. But through the ears of a colleague who has a mental health challenge, they can sound like indictments. Would you open up about a disorder or tell your team leader you needed time to see a therapist after hearing these words?
 
Rethink “sick days.” If you have cancer, no one says, “Let’s just push through” or “Can you learn to deal with it?” They recognize that it’s an illness and you’ll need to take time off to treat it. If you have the flu, your manager will tell you to go home and rest. But few people in business would react to emotional outbursts or other signs of stress, anxiety, or manic behavior in the same way. We need to get more comfortable with the idea of suggesting and requesting days to focus on improving mental as well as physical health.
 
Encourage open and honest conversations. It’s important to create safe spaces for people to talk about their own challenges, past and present, without fear of being called “unstable” or passed up for the next big project or promotion. Employees shouldn’t fear that they will be judged or excluded if they open up in this way. Leaders can set the tone for this by sharing their own experiences, as we’ve done, or stories of other people who have struggled with mental health issues, gotten help and resumed successful careers. They should also explicitly encourage everyone to speak up when feeling overwhelmed or in need.
 
Be proactive. Not all stress is bad, and people in high-pressure careers often grow accustomed to it or develop coping mechanisms. However, prolonged unmanageable stress can contribute to worsening symptoms of mental illness. How can managers ensure their employees are finding the right balance? By offering access to programs, resources, and education on stress management and resilience-building. In our marketplace survey on employee burnout, nearly 70 percent of respondents said that their employers were not doing enough to prevent or alleviate burnout. Bosses need to do a better job of helping their employees connect to resources before stress leads to more serious problems.
 
Train people to notice and respond. Most offices keep a medical kit around in case someone needs a bandage or an aspirin. We’ve also begun to train our people in Mental Health First Aid, a national program proven to increase people’s ability to recognize the signs of someone who may be struggling with a mental health challenge and connect them to support resources. Through role plays and other activities, they offer guidance in how to listen non-judgmentally, offer reassurance, and assess the risk of suicide or self-harm when, for example, a colleague is suffering a panic attack or reacting to a traumatic event. These can be difficult, emotionally charged conversations, and they can come at unexpected times, so it’s important to be ready for them.
 
When your people are struggling, you want them to be able to open up and ask for help. These five strategies can help any boss or organization create a culture that ceases to stigmatize mental illness.
 
At Harmless we offer tailored, bespoke training for organisations around the country. If you would like more information please contact training@harmless.org.uk or phone 01158800280.
 
Original blog: https://hbr.org/2019/02/5-ways-bosses-can-reduce-the-stigma-of-mental-health-at-work

Last chance for tickets

Last chance to buy tickets for our Harm to Hope conference, Friday 1st March. Tickets are selling fast and the event is just round the corner!
 
Purchase tickets soon to avoid missing out on an incredible CPD accredited conference, with a wealth of expertise and practical skills.
 
This years theme is: Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.
Friday 1st March 2019
£150 per delegate place*
or
2 delegate places for £200*
 
The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes.
 
Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
· Collaborative partnership,
· Service user representation,
· Effective practice,
· Driving change &
· Overcoming stigma and discrimination.
 
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.
 
Speakers:
Prof. Nav Kapur
Dr Alys Cole-King
Prof. Siobhan O’Neill
Dr Sarah Cassidy
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre.
 
Where can I find more information?
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280
 
Tickets available here http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

In the News: UK’s first Neonatal Mental Health Awareness Week

NEONATAL mental health awareness week runs from April 15 to 21, inspiring charities and neonatal wards to apply better practice around the mental health of parents and staff.
 
Leo’s, which supports families around the region through premature and traumatic births, the neonatal journey and beyond, has been the driving force in creating the week.
 
The week will highlight the long-lasting impacts on the mental health of parents, siblings and grandparents when they have been on a neonatal journey.
 
It will also consider the impact on midwives, neonatal nurses and doctors and allied health professionals such as neonatal occupational therapists, physiotherapists and speech and language therapists who work in neonatal care. There will be a range of activities for parents, staff, charities and organisations to take part in, including fundraising for their chosen neonatal ward or charity, practicing mindfulness and random acts of kindness.
 
Leo’s recently launched a nationwide survey to discover just how much of an impact having a sick or premature baby has on families after they leave a neonatal unit, and how health care professionals cope with working in such an emotionally and demanding environment.
Leo’s founder Lottie King said: “Mental health is such a huge topic right now, and often the experiences which both parents and staff face on a neonatal unit can be very traumatic.
 
“From baby loss to emergency procedures, unexpected decline in baby’s health or a resuscitation of a baby – these have a huge impact on all of those involved.
 
“Thanks to recent findings from Bliss and The Smallest Things Charity, we know that whilst on the neonatal unit many families experience mental health issues.
 
“However, what we want to know now is how this impacts once they go home. For example, are parents needing to take medication, are they needing to take time off work at different points of the year because of triggers, or are families struggling because of the strain something like this can put on relationships?
 
“By understanding this, we hope to inspire the changes needed so that when parents do go home, they can be supported, and their mental health is in a positive place.”
 
Leading London based neonatal psychologist Rebecca Chilvers is working with the charity to help them campaign for change and validate the results.
 
Claire Campbell, Senior Neonatal Sister and Leo’s Trustee said: “As medicine advances, babies are surviving being born even earlier, some at 22 weeks gestation, and babies with complex needs are now able to go home with care-packages.
 
“The care I witnessed at the start of my career over 30 years ago is very different to the care babies receive now and that has a larger impact on parents and staff.
“Being a neonatal nurse means we don’t just care for the baby, but we care for the family too. We are a big part of their journey, and they become a big part of ours.
 
“We become so close to the families we care for that if the worst should happen and that baby doesn’t make it home, we grieve too. Every family we care for leaves an imprint on us and we too get affected by the journey baby can go through.
 
“We may go home and think for the rest of our evening about the baby we cared for that day. If we are off for a few days, many of us will ring in to check on how baby is doing, especially if they have been critically unwell.
 
“It’s becoming increasingly important to recognise the effect this can have on staff, and whilst this won’t alter their ability to care for a baby and its family, we need to care for the staff too.
 
“Our survey has had an excellent response from the medical community with midwives, neonatal nurses and doctors and allied health professionals all opening up about the impact their job can have on them.”
The week will seek to engage charitable organisations from across the UK, NHS Trusts, neonatal, maternity and perinatal networks and parents. The findings from the survey will direct the campaigns for change.
 
It also supports the maternity department at The University Hospital of North Tees and works closely with the Northern Neonatal Network.
To find out more about the week head to leosneonatal.org/neonatal-mental-health-awareness-week/
For more information on Leo’s visit leosneonatal.org
 

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

In the Media: Excluded children more likely to develop mental health conditions

Children who are excluded are more likely to develop a mental health condition than their peers who stay in mainstream, a leading researcher told the Mental Health in Education conference on Wednesday.
 
“It won’t surprise anyone that children with mental health conditions, particularly the more disruptive ones – ADHD and conduct disorder – are more likely to be excluded,” said Tamsin Ford (pictured).
The decision to move a pupil to alternative provision should be made for the good of the child and not the school, said Ford, professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Exeter Medical School.
 
“Schools have to function, and managing behaviour in school is really hard, but maybe moves to alternative provision should be about meeting children’s needs and not because they’ve had ADHD and they’re being put in a situation they cannot cope with and not being provided with a sufficient remediation period.”
 
Ford was referring to official exclusions, but her words echo the definition of off-rolling used in the new draft Ofsted framework: “the practice of removing a learner from the provider’s roll without a formal, permanent exclusion or by encouraging a parent to remove their child, when the removal is primarily in the interests of the provider rather than in the best interests of the learner”.
 
The research looked at 10,000 pupils aged 5-15 over two periods of three years (1999-2002 and 2004-07) and used in-depth multi-informant surveys and interviews.
 
It also found that children with a mental health disorder were more likely to play truant, particularly those with ADHD, and not all of them received effective treatment, Ford said.
 
“ADHD responds to various drugs, to treatment, and that costs a lot less than alternative provision, yet only about a third of them are getting into clinics – and clinics have long waiting lists.”
 
A third survey was done in 2017, and the follow-up research at the three-year mark was originally commissioned to run in 2020, but government funding has stalled. “We have lots of people saying yes, we need to do this, and nobody coming forward with the funding.
“There is some academic work suggesting the outcomes for children and mental health are worse now, and if we had three samples over two decades that were followed up with diagnosis it’s almost a complete dataset and we could actually unpick that.”
 
Link to original blog: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/excluded-children-more-likely-to-develop-mental-health-conditions/

In the News: NHS staff should be able to jump the queue to access mental health support, health secretary proposes

Doctors, nurses and other frontline NHS staff should be allowed to jump long queues to access mental health treatment ahead of the general public, according to proposals backed by the health secretary.
Matt Hancock has pledged “immediate access” to mental health support for NHS staff and on Wednesday will set out his priorities from a new report. This includes “fast-tracked mental health referrals for NHS employees” if they’re identified as a priority by a GP or an occupational health clinician.
 
Mr Hancock said the mental and physical wellbeing of NHS staff was an “utmost priority” but the Department of Health and Social Care could not say when or if the proposals would be implemented.
Mental experts said patients are also put at risk if staff are struggling, but warned the proposals alone would not address widespread staff shortages and underfunding which are driving burnout.
 
The recommendations come from a report by the Health Education England NHS Staff and Learners’ Mental Wellbeing Commission, set up by former health secretary Jeremy Hunt last year.
It comes after the NHS staff survey found fewer than a third of staff thought their organisation was taking steps to look after their mental health.
 
Theresa May has said mental health is one of her top priorities. However shortages of psychiatrists and mental health nurses mean people with serious mental health needs can wait up to 14 weeks just to be assessed, according to charity Rethink Mental Illness, and many struggle to access support in the community.
The NHS long term plan, released last month, pledges £2.3bn for mental health improvements, in addition to a commitment to making the NHS a better employer to work for. But critics have said key pressure points, like workforce, were left unaddressed.
 
Mr Hancock’s priorities which he envisioned would make up a future mental health scheme include a 24-hour mental health support service, assessments or peer support after traumatic event, and a workforce wellbeing guardian in every NHS organisation.
There is also a call for basic facilities such as lockers, or space for staff to rest and shower when they’re on call.
 
The Commission said it was “concerned by the extent to which the provision of basic support…has been eroded over time” and said NHS capital budgets should earmark funding for staff facilities. These budgets, intended for buildings and equipment, have been raided by the government in each of the past four years in order to keep frontline services running.
 
“Failure to properly prioritise [NHS staff] mental wellbeing can have dire consequences that affect service users and employees, said Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind, welcoming the recommendations.
“None of its promisis will become reality unless we invest not only in the mental health of current staff but also recruit a larger workforce,” he added.
 
The proposals will now be considered as part of a wider review of NHS workforce, and if supported would need funding at the next spending review, the Department of Health confirmed.
“I’m so proud of the service NHS staff give, so the mental and physical wellbeing of the people who work in our health service must be our utmost priority,” Mr Hancock is due to say in London later on Wednesday.
 
“Today’s important report helps guide how we can do that, from creating the right culture of support to giving everyone somewhere to turn in the toughest times.”