From Harm to Hope

From Harm to Hope
 
Theme – Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
Friday 28th February 2020
 
£100 per delegate place
 
(£90 Early bird rate end on 30th November, tickets will be £100 thereafter. Tickets must be booked and paid for to qualify for the Early Bird rate)
 
As a third sector organisation, we appreciate the barriers that many professionals face when accessing CPD opportunities. We are proud to offer reduced ticket prices to ensure those who support people bereaved by suicide can improve their skills and knowledge in a more affordable way. Some things are more important than just making money.
 
Conference details:
 
The theme of our conference is Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
The theme of this conference in response to the shocking rise in female suicides. Rates for females’ ages 10-24 has seen the most significant increase with deaths at 3.3 per 100,000 females in the UK.
 
Research is telling us that whilst men are the most at risk group to die by suicide, the rate of deaths by women are increasing at shocking rate, and Harmless in response have themed our conference around this.
 
Join us to explore: Apathy, The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women. With presentations and workshops around trauma, personality disorder, self harm, domestic abuse and eating disorders we hope the day will respond time the needs of women, firmly and positively.
 
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and suicide prevention and practitioners & academics within the field in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
 
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm and suicide prevention.
 
Confirmed Sessions:
 
Perinatal Mental Health
 
Trauma
 
Personality Disorder
 
Menopause
 
Domestic Abuse
 
Eating Disorders
 
Autism
 
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre at Nottingham Trent University.
 
Where can I find more information?
 
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
 
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280
 

In the Media: Duchess of Cambridge calls for more support for teacher wellbeing

The Duchess of Cambridge has praised teachers for the “vital” role they play in shaping pupils’ lives and called for more support for their wellbeing.
 
Speaking at the Mental Health in Education conference, she said teachers played a key role in helping children to develop at the most important point in their lives.
 
Earlier she held discussions with headteachers, Ofsted’s chief inspector Amanda Spielman and other leading education experts.
“What you’ve all been discussing here today really brings to life the vital role that teachers are playing in supporting our youngest children’s mental health,” the Duchess told the conference in London’s Mercer’s Hall.
 
“Over the last eight years working with charities, I’ve met some of our leading experts in mental health, addiction, family breakdown, homelessness and education.”
 
“They have taught me over and over again that the root cause of so many of today’s social problems can be traced right back to the very earliest years of a person’s life – and often over generations.”
 
“The scientific and other evidence is clear: the first few years of a child’s life are more pivotal for development and for future health and happiness than any other single moment in our lifetime.
 
“It is also clear that the positive development of our children is directly linked to those who care for them: teachers, carers and parents.”
 
“And as we’ve heard today, it is therefore vital that we support teachers with their own wellbeing so that they can provide the best level of care for all children in their schools and communities in which they work.”
 
Today’s conference brought together experts from education and mental health to discuss what can be done to tackle wellbeing issues in schools.
 
Original blog: https://www.tes.com/news/duchess-cambridge-calls-more-support-teacher-wellbeing

Carl Jung says these 5 factors are crucial to living a happy life

Carl Jung was a renowned psychology expert who founded many theories about personality, identity, and analytical psychology.

His work has been studied the world over, and today, many of this theories and suggestions for improving one’s life still hold true.

In our hustle and bustle world, it can be hard to find time to smell the proverbial roses and it seems that the more access we have to things, the less unsure we are of what can make us happier.

The search for happiness is very real and many affluent psychologists have been busy trying to find their answers to some of life’s most difficult questions.

What makes us happy is not the same for everyone. Pop culture likes to remind us that money and owning stuff is the quickest way to achieve the happiness we seek, but a growing body of literature is claiming its place amongst the theories to remind us that we need only look inward.

And Jung was one of the first to make this claim.

Here are five factors which can improve your own happiness, according to Carl Jung:

1) Take Care Of Your Physical and Mental Health

It should not come as a surprise to anyone that taking care of your body, exercising, eating right, getting the sleep your body needs, and tending to the needs of your mental health can help to make you a happier person overall.

The physical benefits of exercise alone is enough to make someone happier. Our bodies release endorphins when we exercise and these endorphins can provide us with the same level of satisfaction that chocolate can.

So rather than fill up on chocolate that could make you feel bloated and full of guilt, spend time outdoors walking. Your body and brain will thank you for you.

2) Working to Improve Your Relationships

Humans crave love and attention and we are able to satisfy those cravings with our relationships: friends, family, marriages, coworkers, neighbors.

Everyone in our lives has the ability to make us feel happy. Of course, we can’t like everyone all the time, and we don’t always get along with everyone all the time, but the general consensus is that someone who is loved and who works to put their relationships first, experiences more happiness overall than people who don’t.

Which makes sense if you think about it, people who spend their lives alone don’t tend to be very happy. Sharing your life with people can make you happier.

What’s more, spending your life in service of others: your wife, children, friends, extended family, can make you feel happier as well. When we remove our needs from the equation and work to make others happy, we experience a great deal of happiness as a byproduct of those actions.

3) See the Beauty All Around

Yesterday I put a pot of soup on the stove to boil and then hours later remembered that I had put soup on the stove. Thankfully, my husband saw that I was busy with housework, so he took the soup off the stove before it burned and made a mess.

This is just one example of how busy our lives are: we don’t even remember that we wanted to eat soup for lunch.

If we want to be happier, we need to slow down and take in the scenery around us. Stop and eat lunch, smell those roses, nap on the patio, picnic under a tree, share some change with a man on the street, visit a friend, appreciate the beauty that is everywhere.

We don’t do this enough as humans. There is always money to make and places to go and projects to deliver. Taking the time to soak up the world around us can help improve our happiness and reduce our stress levels as well.

4) Enjoy Your Work and Life

Everyone’s interest in work varies depending on who you are talking to. There is a great divide between people who live to work and those who work to live.

The happiness of employees seems to go up when they enjoy their work and don’t feel like they need to separate their personal from their professional lives.

When we feel needed and productive, our levels of happiness go up. While many people don’t put any stock in their jobs at all, those that do experience more satisfaction and better standards of living overall because they take pride in their work and products.

5) Something to Believe

While formal religion is not necessary to lead a long and happy life, many people, including Jung, believed that having something bigger than yourself to believe in could lead you down a path of happiness.

The idea that life doesn’t end when we leave this world is of great comfort to millions of people and it can bring solace and acceptance during particularly difficult times in our lives.

If you find yourself struggling to grab hold of happiness, try focusing on one aspect of your life that you can improve upon. Sometimes, the simple of act trying to improve one’s self or one’s situation can bring about a great deal of satisfaction and happiness as well.

Original source here

From Harm to Hope

From Harm to Hope
 
Theme – Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
Friday 28th February 2020
 
£100 per delegate place
 
(£90 Early bird rate end on 30th November, tickets will be £100 thereafter. Tickets must be booked and paid for to qualify for the Early Bird rate)
 
As a third sector organisation, we appreciate the barriers that many professionals face when accessing CPD opportunities. We are proud to offer reduced ticket prices to ensure those who support people bereaved by suicide can improve their skills and knowledge in a more affordable way. Some things are more important than just making money.
 
Conference details:
 
The theme of our conference is Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
The theme of this conference in response to the shocking rise in female suicides. Rates for females’ ages 10-24 has seen the most significant increase with deaths at 3.3 per 100,000 females in the UK.
 
Research is telling us that whilst men are the most at risk group to die by suicide, the rate of deaths by women are increasing at shocking rate, and Harmless in response have themed our conference around this.
 
Join us to explore: Apathy, The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women. With presentations and workshops around trauma, personality disorder, self harm, domestic abuse and eating disorders we hope the day will respond time the needs of women, firmly and positively.
 
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and suicide prevention and practitioners & academics within the field in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
 
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm and suicide prevention.
 
Confirmed Sessions:
 
Perinatal Mental Health
 
Trauma
 
Personality Disorder
 
Menopause
 
Domestic Abuse
 
Eating Disorders
 
Autism
 
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre at Nottingham Trent University.
 
Where can I find more information?
 
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
 
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280
 

In the News: Too many older people given ‘antidepressants instead of therapy’

GPs are giving too many older people antidepressants when they are struggling with depression, and should prescribe talking therapies far more often, according to new research. Family doctors too often avoid talking to patients over the age of 65 about depression and do not have the time to explore and treat the condition properly, the study found.
 
Antidepressants work – but we need to talk, too
 
Almost one in 10 over-75s are thought to suffer from depression, while almost four in 10 (37.4%) exhibit some symptoms. However, the vast majority, 87%, are treated with medication, even though it often does not help, according to the findings.
 
Too often GPs dismiss talking therapies as a way of tackling depression in older people, partly because there are long waiting times to start treatment, according to the paper, which has been published in the British Journal of General Practice.
 
NHS Digital figures show that although 1.4 million people of all ages were referred for help to NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) in 2017/18, just 91,117 of them (6.3%) were aged over 65. Similarly, while 1 million of all those referred started talking therapies treatment, only 74,503, or 7.4%, of those were over 65.
 
Even though evidence shows that talking therapies help older people with depression, they are twice as likely as younger people to be treated with antidepressants. Those aged over 85 are five times less likely than 55 to 59-year-olds to receive psychological help. In some areas, as few as 3.5% of over-65s are recommended to see a therapist to undergo a course of cognitive behaviour therapy.
 
“There needs to be greater access to talking therapies. They are effective in older populations, but we know that GPs are less likely to refer those in their 80s to psychological therapies for depressive symptoms than those in their 50s and 60s,” said Rachael Frost, an academic at University College London and the lead author of the paper.
 
Older people may be reluctant to access NHS help because they fear they will be stigmatised, or that nothing can be done about their condition anyway, says the report. In addition, GPs often use their appointments to discuss the older person’s physical health, rather than their mental wellbeing, they found. Some fail to act on cues suggesting that over-65s want to talk about how they are feeling.
Their conclusions are based on a review of the evidence from 27 studies done in western countries, including eight from the UK, into how health professionals deal with patients over 65 who have depression.
 
Prof Helen Stokes-Lampard, the chair of the Royal College of GPs, said family doctors only prescribed antidepressants “after a full and frank discussion with the patient sitting in front of us, based on their individual circumstances, and if we genuinely believe they will help them.
 
“Regardless of a patient’s age, depression can be incredibly distressing and debilitating, and research has shown that for many adult patients, antidepressants can be effective drugs at alleviating its symptoms.” Provision of talking therapies was “patchy”, she added.
Caroline Abrahams, the charity director of Age UK, said: “These figures once again show that older people are missing out on talking therapies and other effective treatments for mental health conditions, with medication too often being the prescribed approach.
 
“Depression and anxiety affects nearly three million people over 60, and older people mustn’t miss out on help and treatment because either they aren’t offered it or don’t know where to go for help. Talking therapies can benefit everyone, regardless of age.”

From Harm to Hope, Friday 1st March 2019

Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Friday 1st March 2019, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is: ‘our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes’.

JOIN US
£150 per delegate place*
Or
2 delegate places for £200*

Conference details:

The theme of our conference is Our young people: intervention & early intervention for improved outcomes. 

Harmless recognises that self harm affects a broad range of individuals, facing many diverse experiences; reducing the number of individuals that self harm requires contributions from across society and includes education, prevention, intervention and postvention work.

This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and practitioners & academics in the field of self harm in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.

Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:

  • Collaborative partnership,
  • Service user representation,
  • Effective practice,
  • Driving change &
  • Overcoming stigma and discrimination.

Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm.

Speakers:

Dr Nav Kapur

Dr ​Alys Cole-King

Prof. Siobhan O’Neill

Dr Sarah Cassidy

http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/self-harm-conference-2019

In the News: School replaces detention with meditation and has astounding results

The Dalai Lama once said: “If every 8 year old in the world is taught meditation, we will eliminate violence from the world within one generation.”
 
According to recent news articles by Newsweek and The Times, the students in detention at Robert W. Coleman Elementary School in Baltimore aren’t staring at chalkboards and walls during detention—they’re meditating and practicing yoga as part of an after-school program.
 
Here’s how the project, created by the Holistic Life Foundation, works: Holistic Me hosts 120 male and female students in a program that runs from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. and involves yoga, breathing exercises and meditative activities. Disruptive students are brought to a special place called the Mindful Moment Room for breathing practices and discussion with a counselor and are instructed on how to manage their emotions.
 
The project, which focuses on pre-kindergarten through fifth-grade students, approaches punishment in an entirely different way and reports an incredible result: zero suspensions in the last year.
Comparatively, the 2013–2014 school year had four suspensions.
“With the first year being so successful, I started seeing a difference in their behaviors. Instead of the students fighting or lashing out, they started to use words to solve their problems,” the school principal, Carlillian Thompson, told the Holistic Life Foundation in a news interview. “We see the success rate of those students who began in the program now. They are middle school students who are very successful; they come back and participate in the program.”
 
Their goal was to provide kids from a low-income and high-crime-rate neighborhood with the tools to cope with stress and anger. Over the past 15 years, students of the program have graduated and transitioned into mentor roles—former students now make up 50 percent of its workforce.
 
Meditation is an ancient practice that was always used as an essential tool for bringing a person’s mind back into balance.
 

From Harm to Hope

From Harm to Hope
 
Theme – Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
Friday 28th February 2020
 
£100 per delegate place
 
(£90 Early bird rate end on 30th November, tickets will be £100 thereafter. Tickets must be booked and paid for to qualify for the Early Bird rate)
 
As a third sector organisation, we appreciate the barriers that many professionals face when accessing CPD opportunities. We are proud to offer reduced ticket prices to ensure those who support people bereaved by suicide can improve their skills and knowledge in a more affordable way. Some things are more important than just making money.
 
Conference details:
 
The theme of our conference is Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
The theme of this conference in response to the shocking rise in female suicides. Rates for females’ ages 10-24 has seen the most significant increase with deaths at 3.3 per 100,000 females in the UK.
 
Research is telling us that whilst men are the most at risk group to die by suicide, the rate of deaths by women are increasing at shocking rate, and Harmless in response have themed our conference around this.
 
Join us to explore: Apathy, The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women. With presentations and workshops around trauma, personality disorder, self harm, domestic abuse and eating disorders we hope the day will respond time the needs of women, firmly and positively.
 
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and suicide prevention and practitioners & academics within the field in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
 
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm and suicide prevention.
 
Confirmed Sessions:
 
Perinatal Mental Health
 
Trauma
 
Personality Disorder
 
Menopause
 
Domestic Abuse
 
Eating Disorders
 
Autism
 
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre at Nottingham Trent University.
 
Where can I find more information?
 
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
 
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280
 

Youth suicide prevention needs more than social media regulation

I cannot remember another time in the recent past when the prevention of youth suicide and self-harm has led the news cycle to such a degree – as it has done in the past few weeks in the UK. This is fantastic and long overdue. As someone who has been working in the suicide prevention field for 20+ years and who has lost important people in my life to suicide, I never thought I’d see the day when suicide prevention would be talked about so openly (and appropriately, for the most part) in the mainstream media.

I have also been incredibly moved by the personal stories of loss that so many heartbroken loved ones have shared. Indeed, if it wasn’t for these vital contributions and the advocacy of those bereaved by suicide, I doubt that suicide prevention would be the leading political priority that it has become.  The governments across the UK (and the many advocates who campaign tirelessly) should be commended for prioritising suicide prevention which culminated in a global first – the appointment of a first-ever Minister for Suicide Prevention announced in England last year on World Suicide Prevention Day.

However, as I illustrated in a recent tweet, my concern is that we may miss this golden opportunity to really move our suicide prevention efforts forward by blaming social media companies. By focusing too much attention on social media, we run the risk of ignoring the social, clinical, cultural and psychological causes of youth suicide. It is too easy, and inaccurate, to level the blame for youth self-harm/suicide at the apps of social media organisations.  My fear is that ‘the social media and suicide’ headlines are hiding the fact that most people who die by suicide are trapped by disadvantage and/or emotional pain, have often experienced early life trauma and/or did not receive the timely and tailored mental health treatment that they so badly needed. That should be our focus – how do we keep our young people safe – offline as well as online – especially the most vulnerable?

Tackling social inequality and adequately funding mental health services will save countless more lives than regulating social media companies.  It shouldn’t be an either-or, though; it should be both.  In all of the recent media coverage, rarely has the complexity of suicide risk been conveyed (see Panel 1 below from Hawton, Saunders & O’Connor, 2012). Tackling social media use is only one part of the puzzle. The fact that mental health services have been cut, that the most disadvantaged are not protected and that there are unacceptably long waiting lists is at the heart of suicide prevention.

Of course, we should ensure that graphic images of self-harm and suicide are removed from social media platforms like Instagram. And I welcome the UK government’s efforts to ensure that Instagram (and other platforms) removes all such content – and NSPCC’s call to help keep young people safe online. These efforts are important because we know there is an association between suicide/self-harm and suicidal behaviour. Indeed, a few years ago, we asked adolescents about the factors that influenced their self-harm and about 1 in 5 mentioned social media/internet as a factor. This number has likely grown since.  So I am not questioning the relationship itself. But the relationship between social media use and suicide/self-harm is weak and complicated; it is not the key driver for suicide; and for many young people, social media acts as a safety net in times of crisis when mental health services are not available. We need to be careful not to demonise all aspects of social media and inadvertently remove this vital source of support for our young people. Another challenge is that the evidence for what works – in terms of treatments for suicidal young people – is severely lacking.  As a matter of urgency, we need to fund more suicide prevention research.

I sincerely hope that politicians who were so vocal in their calls to regulate social media platforms will be similarly vocal in calling for more research into treatments to prevent suicide.  We need a step-change in funding for youth suicide prevention.  Let’s harness this moment to highlight the complexity of suicide risk; to promote hope and recovery and crucially to maintain the pressure on government to ensure that their strong words around suicide prevention are translated into funding for suicide prevention research and much needed services.

If you are affected by suicide or you are worried about someone, Samaritans is available 24/7 on 116 123 or via email jo@samaritans.org.  More crisis information is available here.

Professor Rory O’Connor
Director, Suicidal Behaviour Research Laboratory
12/02/2019

http://www.suicideresearch.info/news-1/youthsuicidepreventionneedsmorethansocialmediaregulation?fbclid=IwAR3ZBqE2jw2OPMkEBULVp5V6wOErBuapcIY_x76PyNDok3gLqTCN5QcLJxI

From Harm to Hope

From Harm to Hope
 
Theme – Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
Friday 28th February 2020
 
£100 per delegate place
 
(£90 Early bird rate end on 30th November, tickets will be £100 thereafter. Tickets must be booked and paid for to qualify for the Early Bird rate)
 
As a third sector organisation, we appreciate the barriers that many professionals face when accessing CPD opportunities. We are proud to offer reduced ticket prices to ensure those who support people bereaved by suicide can improve their skills and knowledge in a more affordable way. Some things are more important than just making money.
 
Conference details:
 
The theme of our conference is Apathy: The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women.
 
The theme of this conference in response to the shocking rise in female suicides. Rates for females’ ages 10-24 has seen the most significant increase with deaths at 3.3 per 100,000 females in the UK.
 
Research is telling us that whilst men are the most at risk group to die by suicide, the rate of deaths by women are increasing at shocking rate, and Harmless in response have themed our conference around this.
 
Join us to explore: Apathy, The growing need for us to listen to our ‘hysterical’ women. With presentations and workshops around trauma, personality disorder, self harm, domestic abuse and eating disorders we hope the day will respond time the needs of women, firmly and positively.
 
This exciting new event will bring together private, public, voluntary and community sector organisations, individuals with lived experience of self harm and suicide prevention and practitioners & academics within the field in an ethos of joint working and shared experience.
 
Our conference is themed around five strategic areas:
 
Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination
Delegates can expect to take away from the conference a range of knowledge, inspiration and practical applications for the implementation in real life personal and professional situations. Learning from some of the leaders in the field, delegates will have access to interactive sessions that can drive change in the field of self harm and suicide prevention.
 
Confirmed Sessions:
 
Perinatal Mental Health
 
Trauma
 
Personality Disorder
 
Menopause
 
Domestic Abuse
 
Eating Disorders
 
Autism
 
Venue:
The conference will be held at the specialist conference venue in the heart of Nottingham, The Nottingham Conference Centre at Nottingham Trent University.
 
Where can I find more information?
 
If you would like more information about the forthcoming conference, then please email admin@harmless.org.uk
 
Or speak directly to a member of our team on: 0115 880 0280