Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

Harmless are pleased to offer these exciting opportunities to join our passionate team and help us save lives. We are looking for dynamic individuals, who are willing to develop their skills; work outside the box and challenge themselves.
We are currently recruiting for the following positions to join our team:

  • Support Officer
  • Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

The deadline for applications for the Support Officer role is 12pm on Friday 10th January 2020. Any applications received after this date may not be accepted. Interviews are due to take place on Friday 17th January 2020.

There is no set deadline for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role and we will  be interviewing periodically. Once this position has been filled we will no longer be accepting applications, therefore applying early is advised.

 

Click here to download the application pack for the Support Officer role

 

Click here to download the application pack for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role

 

______________________________________________________________________

JOB TITLE: 
Support Officer

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £21,819 pro rata
(Depending on experience)
Please note: Driving will be a necessary part of the role and therefore applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.

______________________________________________________________________

JOB TITLE: 
Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £21,819 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)
Please note: Driving will be a necessary part of the role and therefore applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.

______________________________________________________________________

 

If you have any questions regarding these roles or the application process, please contact us:

Phone: 0115 880 0280
Email: admin@harmless.org.uk.

In case you missed it… our CEO speaks out about her experiences: My story, Caroline Harroe

It has taken me a really long time to assemble the words for this, in both my heart and my head, and to find the courage to communicate them.

For those who know me I’m Caroline.

Friend.

Mum.

Wife.

To the broader world I’m Caroline Harroe, CEO of Harmless. Psychotherapist. Leader. Optimist.

2019, for one reason and another, has been particularly difficult for me. A year ago I had twins. I already have twins (and an older child) and a second set of twins was not in the life plan, so to speak. We are very lucky, we know we are, but unfortunately due to trauma and the strike of ill mental health, their arrival has been painful. They were so wanted but their little lives didn’t start quite how we had hoped.

Like many families, the unspoken trauma of birth was their beginnings.

For the best part of the year, like many parents with young babies, I have been tired. Robotic. I haven’t really had room to the feel joy of my babies, I have just been functioning. Doing. Being. Making sure my kids are ok. And my babies are fed. And safe. And feel loved. And looking after my wife, who has been unwell. And working in between everything else to try and keep my beloved service, Harmless, ok.

And look after my team.

And face some really terrible work situations.

And fight for funding that should never be so hard to come by.

And never quite being good enough.

And… keep… going… the rhythm of life maintained me. It didn’t sustain me in any way, but the demands kept me moving.

Like any vehicle running out of fuel, it was inevitable that I’d start to break down.

But I still didn’t see it coming.

My ‘breakdown’, for want of a better word took me by surprise. I am a woman of insight and intellect, of heart and soul and passion. I was too busy on this treadmill of life to stop long enough to look after myself. Too busy caring for everyone else to invest in my own survival.

I broke.

It started slowly, I guess. I started to fixate on my weight. Thoughts coming from desperate tiredness began assuring me that I’d feel better if I lost weight; in control, somehow.

And sure, it did help in the way any eating disorder helps. It made me feel in control when my life felt so overwhelming.

I continued to accept my failings like a sponge, taking criticisms and my sense of inadequacy inside of myself and wrapping my thoughts around them until they eroded me.

Before long this became my normal. The rhythm of life ‘keep going… keep going… get up… feed kids… be a mum… work… keep going’ was somewhat replaced with ‘eat less… eat less…be thinner..:’

For those who don’t understand eating disorders it can be difficult to contemplate but the rumination about food took the place of the constant overwhelm of life. It gave me a focus other than the responsibilities placed upon me. It gave me a place for all of the criticism of me to be acted upon, as though every judgment (internal and external) of me became a self depreciating punishment upon my body. When you have a public profile as I do, everyone’s a critic. No matter how much good you do, there’ll always be those who doubt you, blame you, criticise you… without even knowing you, or even when they do. I have learned, as is true of all of us, that I cannot please everyone but because I was striving to I began to feel as though the world needed less of me. And so I gave the world what I thought it wanted.

Less-of-me.

Each thought about weight loss was driven by a sense of never quite being enough for all the demands placed upon me. In reality I have come to realise that no matter how much good I do, or we do, the reality is that there will always be so much more to do… more money to raise… more people to help… more lives to save.

The greater the demands, the more my sense of inadequacy; the greater my failings, the less space I should assume and the greater the drive to lose weight because this is something I have mastered, something I CAN do well.

Soon enough the noise of this new rhythm meant I truly was out of energy, physically and mentally. My mood was low. My ability to perform against the many tasks in my life untenable. My weight loss goals not attainable (certainly at the rate I hoped for) and my sense of failure, of not being good enough, of being useless became a constant.

I stopped believing in a future.

I stopped feeling the hope that I preach so broadly about…

For a mum who’s never spent time away from her babies, a short stay in hospital was (with hindsight) inevitable but heart wrenching and soul destroying.

It was the ultimate failing.

But it happened.

What happened to me, happened. I steadily lost sight of a future. Of my worth. I was surrounded by personal and professional pressures that outweighed my own resources because I lost sight of self care and if realistic goals.

Support was thin on the ground, though those that were there for me every day and every night sustained me, as I continued to try and keep the plates spinning for everyone I know and love. Professional pressures and scrutiny remained high. Those things hit you hardest when you have been up every night, on your own with small babies, for months and months.

When the world is sleeping, I felt my isolation more.

What happened next, you ask?

Well that’s almost irrelevant. I wrote this down and committed my story to paper to show how easily someone of health and professional stature, someone with a home and a family and friends can steadily become unwell. How we can all be a victim of life and its unpredictable circumstances. I wrote it down so that I am living by the standards I set, that there should be no shame in speaking out about the vulnerabilities of being human. It makes us no less of a person, or a mum, a friend, a colleague, or indeed, a leader.

None of this is said with pessimism, but rather intended as a lesson for us all. We must look after ourselves. We must.

We will run out of steam if not replenished.

We are all vulnerable and at times we all need help no matter what the exterior.

Seek help. From us, from anyone. I am battling my own sense of shame in breaking a silence in the hope that it reaches someone and helps them to share their truth.

No one is immune from the human experience. And no one is professional at being that human. We absolutely have to let each other know that life is something that can be survived if we help each other and let those of us who let pride dictate our silences know that there is also a room for our voices to join the many that say ‘we’ve felt that way too!’

January is often the start of New Years resolutions- to start doing this more, or being that more … to get thinner.

For every person out there, making a decision because they don’t think that they’re good enough already, I hope that my story reaches you. You are enough. Make your resolution to care for yourself more. To take time out. To be home more with those your love. To forgive yourself more, but not necessarily to change yourself.

I hope that your New Years resolution can instead be to be kind to yourself, or to take time for yourself or to accept yourself as you are, or if necessary, to seek help for yourself.

Be healthier, sure but please don’t destroy yourself because of the pressures to be better than you already are.

You’re good enough.

Caroline

Meet Helen, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hello,

My name is Helen, I have recently joined the great team at Harmless as a suicide bereavement support officer for the Tomorrow Project. I am currently training to be a counsellor and I hope this will help me in my supporting role. Most of my previous experience has been people facing and connecting with people is something that I find is rich and rewarding. My background is varied from sales to health and fitness, so well-being is something that is of particular interest to me. This experience has given me an understanding of the importance of self- care, both physical and mental.

I am looking forward to supporting people through the tomorrow project.

Meet Rachel, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hi. I’m Rachel and have recently joined the Tomorrow Project team as a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer. My role will be to work with clients bereaved by suicide in Leicestershire, offering practical and emotional support. The heart of our service is the ethos that with the right support and help life can get better. I expect the role to be challenging at times, emotive but rewarding.

Prior to joining the Tomorrow Project I worked in bereavement support with a national charity and also as a volunteer counsellor with a Leicester cancer charity. I have also just completed my counselling training with a Diploma in Therapeutic Counselling.

I see the Tomorrow Project as offering a vital support service for those bereaved by suicide who historically across Leicestershire may have had to wait for weeks or even months to access support. Expressing feelings and thoughts to those close to you or a support organisation is something that has been shown to help. Although all bereavements are different, as someone who has been bereaved by suicide I personally also have some experience of what clients are going through.

I look forward to helping to drive the support service forward in Leicestershire and ensuring that we are able to help as many clients as possible.

Meet Lisa, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hello, I’m Lisa and I have recently joined the Tomorrow Project as a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer. So why did I take this job?……Well, having lost both my sister and uncle to suicide, I feel I can offer a genuine understanding of the difficulties people may face both with their own grief and in supporting others.

With the numbers of deaths by suicide significantly increasing in recent years, I feel the need to expand our service is paramount. That’s why I am really looking forward to working alongside my colleagues to expand our service by setting up the Chesterfield office: to ensure we are doing everything possible to reach out and support anyone in Derbyshire who has been bereaved by suicide.

Whilst I don’t yet know everyone within the company, those I have met are extremely dedicated and helpful people who are all fun to be around. I still have lots to learn (but hopefully no more eLearning for a while!) and whilst I am still getting to grips with my new role, I am eager to develop our client list as fast as possible and make our service known to everyone.

I am sharing a picture of me with my cat ‘Spartacus’. I think he is very lucky because he has 9 lives. X

Our CEO to be a guest speaker at the NCISH conference in January

Our CEO, Caroline Harroe, will feature as a guest speaker at the upcoming 6th annual National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH) conference due to take place on 23rd January 2020 in Manchester.

Caroline will be speaking about Harmless & The Tomorrow Project’s role and experience in the field of suicide prevention to a national audience to ensure best practice.

For more information on the NCISH conference, please click the following link: https://sites.manchester.ac.uk/ncish/6th-ncish-conference/

Introducing Dr Pauline Turnbull – From Harm to Hope Conference Speaker

Dr Pauline Turnbull has over 15 years’ experience in suicide prevention research. She is currently the Project Director for the National Inquiry into Suicide and Safety in Mental Health (NCISH). Pauline has a particular interest in research impact. At the From Harm to Hope Conference, Pauline will be drawing upon national data from NCISH to provide a useful context in the areas of suicide and self harm in women.

The ‘From Harm to Hope’, self harm and sucide prevention conference will take place on 28th February 2020 in Nottingham.

If you would like more information about the conference or would like to book tickets, please visit the following link: http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/From-Harm-to-hope-conference-2020?product_id=143

Alternatively, you can contact us by phone or email:

Harmless’ celebration event a great success!

All of us here at Harmless and The Tomorrow Project would like to say a massive thank you to everyone who has supported us, and who came along to our celebration event. The evening was a huge success and one we will remember. We were able to raise over £2000 for our support services! It was a truly amazing evening from the outset and throughout and we all went away feeling incredibly humbled by the reactions and positivity of those in attendance.

We were supported by so many individuals and businesses and we can’t express our gratitude for that support enough.

On the night we showed our new film called ‘This Time’, you can see this below:

On the night we heard from Faye & Robert who are a mother and son who shared their stories and experiences with Harmless and the Tomorrow Project. We would like to extend a huge thank you to them both for agreeing to do so and for showing incredible bravery in standing up and sharing their journey.

We would like to thank Thomas Griffiths, our wonderful photographer who has supported us at many events over the past 3 years. Being able to look back on those moments you captured means a great deal to us.

Thank you to Joey Collins. You really made the evening incredibly special with your fantastic live music sets and DJ set. We are all really grateful for your help and support in stepping in at late notice.

Thank you for Wes at Ruddington Grange for all the support in the lead up to the event!! You and your team were amazing and really looked after us!!!

And to all of the businesses (big and small!) who supported us with raffle and auction prizes, we would like to extend a big thank you. Your support really does make a difference and means that through the raffle and auction, we are able to raise vital funds to keep our services running to continue to save lives. These also include Pij Inc, who supplied beautifully made framed pictures that were displayed on the tables with messages of hope. Also to Ruby Lou who baked some delicious cookies for each of our guests on the night.

All of your support means that the 3,500 individuals we have provided with face to face support so far can keep growing for years and years to come, and ultimately be able to save more lives.

Next year, our celebration event will take place on Saturday 26th September 2020, so please save the date!

It was a magical evening and one we won’t forget. Thank you.

The Harmless team

Would you like to work for Harmless as part of our clinical or training teams?

Harmless are pleased to offer these exciting opportunities to join our passionate team and help us save lives. We are looking for dynamic individuals, who are willing to develop their skills; work outside the box and challenge themselves.

We are currently recruiting for the following positions to join our clinical and training teams:

  • Therapist (Nottinghamshire)
  • Suicide Bereavement Support Officer (Leicestershire, Derbyshire & East Midlands)
  • Training Team Administrator (Maternity Cover)

Applications for these positions will be accepted until further notice, but may close at any time and without notice. Please ensure you submit your application as soon as possible if you are interested in any of the roles listed. Successful candidates will be invited to attend an interview during September and October 2019

 

 

 


JOB TITLE: 
Therapist
(Nottinghamshire)

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY:
Up to £23,250 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)

(This position has been funded by a range of funders including, The Big Lottery Fund, Children in Need & Comic Relief).

Please note: Work as part of this role will take place across Nottinghamshire and driving will be a necessary part of the role; therefore, applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.


JOB TITLE: 
Suicide Bereavement Support Officer (Leicestershire, Derbyshire & East Midlands)

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £21,819 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)

Please note: Work as part of this role will take place across the East Midlands and driving will be a necessary part of the role; therefore, applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.


JOB TITLE: 
Training Team Administrator
(Maternity Cover)

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £17,652 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)


If you have any questions regarding these roles or the application process, please contact us:

Phone: 0115 880 0280
Email: admin@harmless.org.uk.

Have you emailed Harmless for self harm support but not received a response? There may be a good reason…

We have become aware of people contacting us but thinking they’re not getting a response. There may be a good reason! Please read on. . .

We will try to get back to everyone who contacts us, and have systems in place to ensure that happens in the vast majority of cases.

The most likely occurrence is that our email reply has been sent to your junk folder (and not your inbox). We ask everyone to please check and add us as a safe sender. This is particularly true of those using outlook or hotmail.

It is important to remember our email support ends in .org.uk and not .co.uk or .com.

Did you get an auto response message when submitting a message online? If not, there is a good chance it didn’t send correctly. Also, our email support system sends an auto reply. If you did not get one, something may have gone wrong and we kindly ask you to try again or look in your jump or spam folder.

If you don’t provide an email address, we may be unable to respond to your message. This is because our email support is only set up to respond to those people who provide a working email account. We will be able to make contact using a phone number, but this will cause a delay in getting back to you.

When you send an email message, we usually need more information before we can support you further. This is because we have to keep you safe, and ensure you get the right help. If you do not get back to us with the information requested, we may be unable to support you fully until we do.

We take confidentiality seriously and are unable to confirm or deny if someone has contacted us unless they have given consent for us to do so. This is true of anyone aged 11 or over. That could mean you are under the impression we have not responded, however, it is possible that we have done but we have to maintain a level of confidentiality.

Sometimes we have responded but the time isn’t right for that person. They may chose to not opt in to services, or not engage with us. That is fine, and we are here when you need us and when you are ready. As mentioned above, Harmless will not confirm or deny if that person has or hasn’t responded unless we have consent. If a loved one has said we have not made contact, it could be they are not ready to engage. Remember, seeking support is often a difficult and daunting experience. This is especially true for those who may have been let down by services elsewhere. We would encourage family members and friends to support them during this distressing time, and seek help themselves in the meantime. We have a friends and family leaflet available if you need it. Also, we hold a monthly drop in service which often helps overcome barriers and challenges of accessing support.

Harmless aim to respond to emails within 5 working days, however, this may increase during busy periods. Please bear with us.

We do not get funding for our email support service. This is paid for by Harmless’ own generated income such as donations and training sales. That means we sometimes have to prioritise our funded face to face services during peak times. This can lead to a delay, but this is rare.

We are here to support you for as long as you need, but Harmless and The Tomorrow Project do not have the resources to provide immediate responses. If you need urgent help, we encourage you to contact one of the services below:

  • Samaritans on 116 123 (Listening support available 24/7, for all ages)
  • SaneLine 0300 304 7000 (Out of hours support service for those aged 16 and over, available 4.30pm until 10.30pm)
  • If you are experiencing a mental health crisis and need support, you can text SHOUT to 85258. (The service is available to all ages, available 24/7)
  • Childline at www.childline.org.uk (Phone, webchat, or email service for those aged 18 years old and under, available 24/7)
  • Hope Line on 0800 068 41 41 (For young people under the age of 35, open 10am – 10pm weekdays; 2pm – 10pm weekends; 2pm – 10pm bank holidays)
  • The Mix at www.themix.org.uk/ (Phone, webchat, or email service for those aged under 25 years old, opening times vary)
  • If you have an urgent medical problem and you’re not sure what to do, please contact NHS 111 (Available to all ages, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week)

Finally, on the very rare occasion your email has been overlooked, please contact us by emailing info@harmless.org.uk directly. Your email is important to us, and we are here to support you. We know that people who reach out to us are often in distress, and we are here for you as best we can. Remember, life can get better with the right help.

For and on behalf of The Harmless Team