In difficult times, Suicide Crisis Service *OPEN* and accepting new referrals

The Tomorrow Project offers support to those in suicide crisis. It is:

  • direct access
  • a primary care service
  • open to all ages
  • a short term service offering emotional and practical support
  • continuing to offer both face to face and remote sessions
  • operating in Nottinghamshire

Accepting self and agency referrals – all responded to within 1 working day

Email: crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk

Referral line: 0115 880 0282 – please note, we ask that a voice message be left and a member of the team will respond within 1 working day.

Please share this information with your colleagues, friends and family so those who need our support know about this vital service. We are here.

Say hello to Laura, the new suicide crisis support officer

Hi! I’m Laura, and this week I joined the Harmless team as a Suicide Crisis Support Officer for the Tomorrow Project. I’m so excited and grateful to be a part of such a fantastic team, and I’ve been welcomed so wonderfully by everybody.

I first heard of Harmless in 2014, when I actually used the service as a client. I stopped using the service in 2015, and in January 2020 I returned to Harmless as a voluntary intern, for which I have been writing an essay about trauma. I have really enjoyed writing about such an important subject, and I’m still continuing to write it from home. As of Tuesday this week, I officially joined the suicide crisis team as a support officer. This week has been a whirl of learning lots of new things, getting to know my colleagues, and being extremely grateful for how my life has turned 180 degrees from 2014 to now. I hope that my summarised story serves as a hopeful reminder to anyone who needs it, that recovery really can happen.

I have come to Harmless after working as a support worker in a low-secure forensic mental health hospital. The hospital specialised in supporting people with personality disorders. Before this, I studied Psychology in Education at the University of York, and spent a lot of time volunteering for Nightline, a listening service for students. These experiences have strengthened my already-existing passion for supporting anyone and everyone with their mental health, and I’m sure that working at Harmless will strengthen that passion that even further.

Starting a new role in times of community crisis – Introducing Stacey, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

I’m Stacey and I’ve recently joined the wonderful team at Harmless in the role of Suicide Bereavement Officer on the Tomorrow Project, supporting those who have been affected in any way by suicide.

 

Taking up my new role at the beginning of March 2020 gave me just a short time before the Coronavirus pandemic started to affect us all both individually and as an organisation.  The team is working incredibly hard to ensure continuity of service, but as someone who has a hereditary lung condition my intensive induction training will now be continuing from home for the foreseeable future.

 

The commitment and dedication at Harmless towards both staff and service users has been truly inspiring, and in these challenging times everybody has pulled together – I feel privileged to be able to say I am part of that team.

 

I come from a varied background although my most recent role has been working as an Independent Funeral Celebrant for the last 7 or so years.  I have officiated over 1000 funeral services and part of this role involved visiting families, hearing their stories and offering support.  Sadly there are a percentage of those families who have been affected by suicide. It is their incredible stories and courage that inspired me to take on the role of Suicide Bereavement Officer.

 

On a personal level my number one self-care measure has to be getting back to nature.  Most weekends will find me at my happiest sat looking out over a river, lake or pond feeding the ducks whilst the sun shines through the trees (weather permitting). On a rainy day Netflix is most definitely my second choice!

 

And so life continues in temporary isolation for so many of us.  I am relying on social media for some interaction (there are some great groups and sites out there offering support) researching and learning everything there is to know about my new role, before the day comes when we are safe and I can actively support the team and service users as we look to hope and recovery.

Stacey.

Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

Harmless are pleased to offer this exciting opportunities to join our passionate team and help us save lives. We are looking for dynamic individuals, who are willing to develop their skills; work outside the box and challenge themselves.

We are currently recruiting for a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer to join our team.

There is no set deadline for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role and we will  be interviewing periodically. Once this position has been filled we will no longer be accepting applications, therefore applying early is advised.

Click here to download the application pack for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role

___________________________________________________________________

JOB TITLE: 
Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £21,819 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)

Please note: Work as part of this role will take place across Nottinghamshire & Leicestershire, therefore driving will be a necessary part of the role applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.

______________________________________________________________________

Click here to download the application pack for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role

 

If you have any questions regarding these roles or the application process, please contact us:

Phone: 0115 880 0280
Email: admin@harmless.org.uk.

Harmless and Tomorrow Project Statement: Coronavirus preparation

“Harmless and The Tomorrow Project continue to monitor the Coronavirus situation and we want to reassure you that we are working hard behind the scenes so that you can keep accessing ongoing support with minimal impact.

Although we are being proactive as an organisation, it is important to acknowledge that we anticipate there will be some disruption to our services in the future. We cannot confirm what they are at this stage, but we continue to be guided by Government, Public Health England and our closest colleagues in the healthcare profession. For now, most face to-face services remain open and you can continue to access support as you do now.

The health and safety of our clients and staff remain at the forefront of all our decisions. We have increased our cleaning regimes of support spaces and waiting areas, particularly for those that come in to physical contact  regularly by other clients and our team members.  In addition, we have made the following decisions:

  1. Firstly, we are taking steps to reduce the number of people in our waiting reception area. Until further notice, people attending support sessions will not be able to bring anyone with them to unless you are a parent who needs to bring a minor or a minor who comes with a  parent.
  2. Secondly, Crisis Cafe and Drop-In sessions will be suspended with immediate effect. Email support will continue but remains limited in terms of response time and support capability.

We are also in the process of contacting clients currently in receipt of support to complete an additional form as we prepare for the possibility of having to provide support remotely. Although we do not expect to do this right now, we are exploring all possible support options for our clients. In addition, we will use the information you provide to contact you should there be any sudden changes to our services that may affect you.

Finally, we want to take this opportunity to reassure you that Harmless and The Tomorrow Project remain fully committed to providing ongoing support to everyone who relies on our services. Regardless of the barriers and challenges we may face in the upcoming weeks; we will work tirelessly to overcome them wherever possible and continue to provide the vital services we deliver.

Best wishes,

The Harmless and Tomorrow Project Team”

CANCELLED – Talk and Ride – our next fundraiser featuring the Corndodgers

The Corndodgers

Sadly, Karen has had to cancel her cycle ride, and all associated events have also been cancelled. Karen will continue her work to raise awareness of suicide risks, and we hope she will be able to carry out her cycle ride later this year, in which case we will do our best to stage this fundraiser in association with that.


Local band The Corndodgers (folk/rock) will be playing at The Chapel, at the Angel Microbrewery on Stoney Street in Nottingham’s Lace Market, on Monday March 23rd from 8pm. They will be supported by Cookie and Paul Carbuncle (folk/punk). The gig is free entry, donate what you can to help Harmless and The Tomorrow Project.

This event is part of Karen Spencer’s “Talk and Ride” awareness and fundraising cycle ride from Manchester to Lefkada in Greece – that’s 3600km! She is doing this in memory of her son, who died by suicide in 2019, to spark conversations about and support for self harm and suicide prevention and awareness. Along the way Karen will make contact with as many people and support agencies as she can to connect and raise awareness.

Karen says: “When a loved one dies, the loss is shattering. When that loved one took their own life or died through self-harming, or drugs, people just don’t know what to say. But it’s those conversations that keep memories alive and allow us to come to terms with how we can live our lives with them still with us, even if they don’t journey by our side any more.”

Come along and support Karen and The Tomorrow Project, and have a good evening while you’re at it!

Meet Carolyn, our Therapist Intern

I started work with Harmless in September 2019 whilst working towards a Level 4 diploma in therapeutic counselling. I was drawn to Harmless because of their passion and commitment in helping people in often the most difficult times of their lives.

During my time at Harmless I have been amazed by the bravery of the clients to tell their story and reach out for help, but equally overwhelmed by the dedication of the staff at Harmless and The Tomorrow Project.

My style is person-centred. Endeavouring to build genuine relationships by listening without judgement, showing empathy, compassion and understanding.

I come with a varied background, HR Consultancy and Youth Work including running a youth camp in South Wales for 7 years. Prior to working with Harmless I worked for small company that produces Sphagnum moss to combat climate change. I have four children (3 who are teenagers). This has given me a greater understanding of the pressure that our teenagers experience at school, exam pressures and bullying, anxiety about self-image, concerns about the future and feeling powerless to change their circumstances.  I am happy to be working with an organisation that is helping people who struggle with these issues.

Introducing Lydia, our newest team member

Hi, I’m Lydia

I’m very excited to be joining The Tomorrow Project as the new suicide crisis support officer.

I’ve got a varied background stemming from qualifying as a chef when I first left school to working with some beautiful people with learning difficulties, autism, dementia, delirium or personality disorders. I believe this has allowed me to gain a very person centred approach and has provided me with a vast knowledge of differing areas. I feel I can bring a lot of knowledge to the team and can’t wait to start making a difference.

Although it is only my second week, I have already had the pleasure of observing client sessions and seeing first hand some of the amazing work being done here at Harmless and The Tomorrow Project.

I’ve also attended my first conference, From Harm to Hope, which Harmless hosted last Friday with the focus on female suicide. I got to meet a variety of incredible individuals and learn about the work they are doing to better the world. One of my favourite workshops of the day was by Lisa Carter on perinatal mental health, this sparked a keen interest in the area for me.

I feel honoured to be part of such an amazing team and I am so excited to progress with them.

 

Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

Harmless are pleased to offer this exciting opportunities to join our passionate team and help us save lives. We are looking for dynamic individuals, who are willing to develop their skills; work outside the box and challenge themselves.

We are currently recruiting for a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer to join our team.

There is no set deadline for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role and we will  be interviewing periodically. Once this position has been filled we will no longer be accepting applications, therefore applying early is advised.

Click here to download the application pack for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role

___________________________________________________________________

JOB TITLE: 
Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

HOURS: 
Up to 37.5 hours per week
(Both part time and full time available)

SALARY: 
Up to £21,819 per annum, pro rata
(Depending on experience)

Please note: Work as part of this role will take place across the East Midlands, therefore driving will be a necessary part of the role applicants will need to hold a valid driver’s license and have access to a car to be able to undertake the position.

______________________________________________________________________

Click here to download the application pack for the Suicide Bereavement Support Officer role

 

If you have any questions regarding these roles or the application process, please contact us:

Phone: 0115 880 0280
Email: admin@harmless.org.uk.

A message from Helen, our Suicide Bereavement Worker

I’m writing this in rainy Leicester and reflecting on the week that has gone by. My personal experience of this week outside of my working life has been a reflection of my working life in the respect that the topic of conversation has been around suicide. A friend’s relation had taken their own life, and then on the news was the tragic story of Caroline Flack.

What seems to be clear to me, is that we all vulnerable to thoughts of suicide at times in our lives, but the thing that might prevent us from acting on these thoughts is having the right kind support at the right time. For the lucky ones in our society this role is filled by family and friends that we can offload our feeling with, and share the emotional isolation that goes with thoughts such as these. For others just the stigma attached to admitting thoughts like this creates a barrier to sharing that is hard to overcome. These can be the perception of being seen as weak, not able to cope, being ‘heavy and ‘intense’, being ‘difficult and depressing to be around’, as well as being labelled as having mental health problems. With this in mind, it is hardly surprising that people make the decision not to share suicidal thoughts and perhaps don’t receive the help and support they need. What never fails to surprise me is the amount of people who disclose suicidal thoughts that they have had at some point in their lives, when they feel that they are in a safe and non- threatening environment. It really is quite common! What is also apparent is that these people have never shared those thoughts with anyone and certainly never did at the time. At the Tomorrow Project we are always starting the conversation, without stigma or judgement because it is a topic that really needs to be addressed both locally and nationally. We want to remove the stigma around suicide that prevents it being a conversation that affects and determines mental health policy, and encourages an open debate about suicide and mental health. I hope that these few days and all the media interest propels the topic of suicide not just as a subject that affects celebrities that are harassed and pursued by the media, but as a subject that affects all individuals and communities in the UK at some point and is an indicator that people’s mental health needs are not being met.