Introducing Professor Tammi Walker – Speaker at our From Harm to Hope conference on 28th February 2020

Tammi is a Professor of Psychology at Teesside University. She is a Chartered Psychologist and Fellow of the British Psychological Society, Registered Senior Fellow with Advance HE and a mental health nurse by clinical background.

Tammi is the world’s leading authority on self-harm and suicide by women in prison and has published extensively on the topic. Her 2016 book Preventing Self-Injury and Suicide in Women’s Prisons (with Professor Graham Towl) is widely regarded as the most influential in forensic psychology.

At our conference on 28th February 2020, she will be presenting a session looking at ‘Women in Prison: Suicide, self-harm and the struggle for survival’.

If you are interesting in booking tickets to the conference, or would like further information, please visit www.harmless.org.uk/store/From-Harm-to-hope-conference-2020.

Or you can contact us by emailing admin@harmless.org.uk, or by calling 0115 880 0280.

Upcoming Catch up Cafe dates to be held in East Leake

Harmless & The Tomorrow Project will be running multiple Catch up cafe’s in East Leake over the upcoming months.
 
The catch up cafes are for those who would like to access some informal, drop in support from our service and for those who would like information about our service.
 
So whether you’d like some information on how we can support you or someone you know – if you’d like to come in and chat with a member of the team or to catch up with others – we will see you at the Catch up Cafe!
 
Upcoming dates:
 
For those aged 21 and under:
 
  • Thursday 23rd January 2020 – 11:30am to 12:30pm
  • Thursday 6th February 2020 – 3pm to 4pm
  • Thursday 26th March 2020 – 11am to 12pm
For those aged 18 and over:
 
  • Wednesday 29th January 2020 – 1pm to 2pm
  • Friday 21st February 2020 – 10:30am to 11:30am
  • Wednesday 11th March 2020 – 2:30pm to 3:30pm
These catch up cafes will be held in our East Leake office at: The Tomorrow Project, Unit 1, Lighting House, 3-5 Station Road, East Leake, Nottinghamshire, LE12 6LQ.

Upcoming Catch up Cafe dates to be held in Nottingham

Harmless & The Tomorrow Project will be running multiple Catch up cafe’s in Nottingham over the upcoming months.

The catch up cafes are for those who would like to access some informal, drop in support from our service and for those who would like information about our service.

So whether you’d like some information on how we can support you or someone you know – if you’d like to come in and chat with a member of the team or to catch up with others – we will see you at the Catch up Cafe!

Upcoming dates:

For those aged 21 and under:

  • Monday 27th January 2020 – 3pm to 4pm
  • Wednesday 19th February 2020 – 12:30pm to 1:30pm
  • Tuesday 10th March 2020 – 12:30pm to 1:30pm

For those aged 18 and over:

  • Thursday 23rd January 2020 – 11:30am to 12:30pm
  • Friday 14th February 2020 – 1pm to 2pm
  • Friday 13th March 2020 – 12:30pm to 1:30pm

These catch up cafes will be held in our Nottingham City office at: Harmless, 1 Beech Avenue, Sherwood Rise, Nottingham, NG7 7LJ.

Meet Helen, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hello,

My name is Helen, I have recently joined the great team at Harmless as a suicide bereavement support officer for the Tomorrow Project. I am currently training to be a counsellor and I hope this will help me in my supporting role. Most of my previous experience has been people facing and connecting with people is something that I find is rich and rewarding. My background is varied from sales to health and fitness, so well-being is something that is of particular interest to me. This experience has given me an understanding of the importance of self- care, both physical and mental.

I am looking forward to supporting people through the tomorrow project.

Meet Rachel, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hi. I’m Rachel and have recently joined the Tomorrow Project team as a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer. My role will be to work with clients bereaved by suicide in Leicestershire, offering practical and emotional support. The heart of our service is the ethos that with the right support and help life can get better. I expect the role to be challenging at times, emotive but rewarding.

Prior to joining the Tomorrow Project I worked in bereavement support with a national charity and also as a volunteer counsellor with a Leicester cancer charity. I have also just completed my counselling training with a Diploma in Therapeutic Counselling.

I see the Tomorrow Project as offering a vital support service for those bereaved by suicide who historically across Leicestershire may have had to wait for weeks or even months to access support. Expressing feelings and thoughts to those close to you or a support organisation is something that has been shown to help. Although all bereavements are different, as someone who has been bereaved by suicide I personally also have some experience of what clients are going through.

I look forward to helping to drive the support service forward in Leicestershire and ensuring that we are able to help as many clients as possible.

Meet Sofia, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hi, my name is Sofia and I have recently joined the team as a suicide bereavement support officer, offering emotional and practical support to those bereaved by suicide. Even though I only joined the team not too long ago I have already learned so much through those that already work for harmless. Working here I can see that there is a variety of wonderful people, in different roles but who share the same passion and values for helping others and that harmless is a judgement free zone.

I have a background working as a support worker and volunteering with women’s aid, this has resulted in me working with many different people from all walks of life. My background has also shown me that I love working with people and know the importance of taking care of our mental health and of one another. In fact I wish I myself had known of these services when I lost a friend to suicide, but now I am aware and work for such a great organisation I want to spread the word and help those who need it.

One of my initial worries when first starting was that I was not good enough for this role when surrounded by so many impressive people. But then I remembered that one of my strongest beliefs is that you should love yourself and accept yourself flaws and all. I also realised that clearly others believe in me so why don’t we believe in ourselves. Something that I think many of us struggle with. Instead of comparing myself to others I should be learning from them and growing as a person, which is why I know here is a place I can really grow and flourish as a person.

Meet Lisa, our new Suicide Bereavement Support Officer

Hello, I’m Lisa and I have recently joined the Tomorrow Project as a Suicide Bereavement Support Officer. So why did I take this job?……Well, having lost both my sister and uncle to suicide, I feel I can offer a genuine understanding of the difficulties people may face both with their own grief and in supporting others.

With the numbers of deaths by suicide significantly increasing in recent years, I feel the need to expand our service is paramount. That’s why I am really looking forward to working alongside my colleagues to expand our service by setting up the Chesterfield office: to ensure we are doing everything possible to reach out and support anyone in Derbyshire who has been bereaved by suicide.

Whilst I don’t yet know everyone within the company, those I have met are extremely dedicated and helpful people who are all fun to be around. I still have lots to learn (but hopefully no more eLearning for a while!) and whilst I am still getting to grips with my new role, I am eager to develop our client list as fast as possible and make our service known to everyone.

I am sharing a picture of me with my cat ‘Spartacus’. I think he is very lucky because he has 9 lives. X

Today, our wonderful colleague and friend Val, has left her Senior Therapist role at Harmless. 

Val has been working for Harmless since 2013, but joined our organisation as a volunteer before she started her counselling role.

Over the years, Val has helped countless number of people with their recovery, and for the many who met her, life got better thanks to her valuable support.

On her last day, The Harmless team presented Val with flowers, and a memory book which contained messages from colleagues and photos from her time with us.

From everyone at Harmless and The Tomorrow Project, we wish Val all the very best in the future. She knows that she will always be part of the Harmless family!

Could you write a blog for us?

Harmless would like to invite you to contribute to our blog. Our blog is important to us because it helps us convey a range of issues around self harm and suicide to the public. It helps us reach people in distress and promote better understanding about these issues among our readers.

It helps us tell you about our work, upcoming events, dispel myths and offer advice. But we also want it to challenge stigma and to offer real stories about self harm and recovery so that people reading this can feel connected to what we do and who we help.

If you would like to write a blog for us about your experiences, then you can submit this to info@harmless.org.uk with the title ‘blog post’. In your email, please tell us what name you would like us to use for you. You can say as little about your identity as you want.

The blog should be about 200 -300 words in length and shouldn’t be graphic in any way, but should offer the reader an insight into your experiences that mighty help them relate to self harm, distress, or suicide. The blog could be about what you’ve felt or experienced, what’s helped, or not helped… What needs to change, or what he stigma around these issues has been for you.

It is vital to harmless that we represent your voice and your experiences, so if you feel you can contribute to this blog, please do.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Self harm rates in UK detention centres and prisons

We know that self harm doesn’t discriminate. It can affect anyone, of any age, anywhere. There are frequently reports in the UK news about high rates of self harm in prisons, and we know that people are uniquely vulnerable when they are in contact with the criminal justice system.

In April 2018, The Independent reported that at least one person a day is self-harming in UK detention centres, and that 2017 saw the highest number of deaths in detainees on record, including six suicides. In addition, self harm incidents in prisons increased by 73% between 2012-16 and there were 120 suicides in prison in 2016 – this is the highest figure on record for any given year.

Cuts to funding and staff have left prisoners and detainees in a more vulnerable position than ever. We want to ensure that all professionals working with people who are at high risk of self harm and suicide are better equipped with the skills, knowledge and confidence to help provide support and promote recovery. Harmless’ Let’s Talk Training team provides courses on self harm awareness, suicide prevention, and mental health awareness. If you would like to find out more, please email us: training@harmless.org.uk