Have you emailed The Tomorrow Project and not received a reply? We’re sorry – We have been having technical issues!

It has come to our attention that emails sent to tomorrow@harmless.org.uk have not been reaching us. Unfortunately, this was due to a  technical issue with the email address that have now been rectified.

We would like to apologise to anyone who has tried to make contact but have not received a reply!

If you have emailed us and not received a response, please email again.

All our other accounts are working fine and have not experience any issues. 

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential, suicide support service offering support to those in suicide crisis and those bereaved and affected by suicide.

If you require crisis or bereavement support, please use the details blow:

 

For crisis support –

crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8447 – please note this number is not a 24hr help line and a project worker will respond within 1 working day

 

For bereavement support -

bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8445

#WSPD Prevention Pathways: FREE Suicide prevention workshops

Join us Friday 8th September for ‘The Story so far…’

CLICK HERE TO BOOK A PLACE 

At this event there will be free training workshops and you will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing  as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories.

Venue
Sir Colin Campbell Building
Wollaton Road
Nottingham
NG8 1BB

Programme

08:30 Registration 
9:00 Welcome 
9:30 The story so far…
10:15 Break 
10:30 Workshop 1
12:00 Lunch 
13:00 Workshop 2
14:30 Break
14:45 Living experience 
15:30 Panel
15:45 Finish 

Lunch & Refreshments provided 

Workshop 1: An Introduction to Suicide crisis intervention
This workshop will establish basic principles around Suicide crisis intervention considering the following areas:
  • Myths & facts about suicide 
  • The impact our attitudes have on a suicide crisis intervention 
  • How to support someone effectively who is in crisis 
  • How to signpost effectively 
Workshop 2: An Introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide

This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: 
  • Identifying risk factors 
  • Understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools
  • Establishing current emotional states & behaviours
  • Reviewing & revisiting risk 

Stranger on the Bridge study: Request for help

This is an opportunity to work with the University of Exeter in their research into how members of the public can help prevent suicide in public places. This work is inspired by Jonny Benjamin’s The Stranger on the Bridge and the University would like to hear from you if you are aged 18 or over, and fall into one of the following groups: 

1.    You have personal experience of attempting or seriously considering taking your own life in a public location and you were prevented from doing so by a stranger.

2.    You have personal experience of trying to prevent someone you didn’t know (a stranger) from taking their own life in a public location.

If you are in doubt about whether your experience fits, please get in touch to talk it through with one of the research team.

For more details see the here on the University of Exeter website, see the Information for Participants (pdf) or email PUBLIS@exeter.ac.uk

Please also share this as widely as you see fit in order to reach others who might be able to take part.

CYCLING TO SAVE LIVES! WE CHALLENGE…YOU!

The circumference of the world is 40,075 kilometres or 24,900 miles. The International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) started Cycle Around The Globe four years ago to see if as a community we can come together. Now four years on from the first success, the next challenge is to cycle 4X around the globe, 163km or 99.60k Mi.

 The challenge is to see if we can all contribute to collectively cycle this distance for World Suicide Prevention Day. Please join us and help us reach this target. It does not matter how far you can cycle, every kilometre or mile will be added to the total and there are no limits, you can cycle at home, in the gym or outside, you can even walk.

 The activity is about global community and spreading awareness of the importance of suicide prevention. In the UK alone there were 6,188 suicides, and this just shows the real need for us as a community to come together.

If you would like to take part click here for the sponsorship form and sign up. Let us know by emailing info@harmless.org.uk or phoning 0115 934 8445.

All the money raised goes directly to Harmless & The Tomorrow Project and provides therapeutic services.

*Official participant printed labels for your t-shirts are available to print off*

Join us and Cycle of WSPD and show the world we are all connected in the aim of preventing suicide.

https://iasp.info/wspd2017/cycle-around-globe/

Suicide Crisis – What does it mean to you?

The word “crisis” in itself is quite an emotive word. For me anyway, when I think of “crisis”, my first image used to be things like panic, immediacy, and fear. It’s defined as “a time of intense difficulty or danger” – this sums it up fairly well, but in this definition there’s no mention of panic or fear – it’s an assumption. While these emotions are commonly present in a person experiencing a crisis, this is not always how that person can present to someone who’s talking to them.

Then, the word “suicide” is also not only an emotive word, but a stigmatised one. We are frequently reluctant to say this word and there’s also a fear of using it, of acknowledging it. I feel this can often be the case for anyone involved; the person themselves, friends and family talking to them about it, as well as professionals involved in their care.

When we then take the phrase “suicide crisis”, this can be a phrase which strikes fear into those involved. But if we’re afraid of the phrase, how can we discuss it openly with someone who is feeling this way? I think it’s really important to be mindful of how a person is experiencing a suicide crisis and how they construe their crisis. While there may be some overlap between people and how they present, there’s fairly often some variance, distinctions, and even contradictions in protective, predisposing etc. factors (e.g., one person’s protective factor could be another person’s precipitating factor).

For me, this interpretation of a suicide crisis makes it all the more important that I ask every person I see not only how they feel, but how they interpret their suicide crisis, what is contributing to it or preventing them from acting on their thoughts, and what made them now want to opt into our crisis pathway.

Within this, I think it’s important to address the person’s experience suicide crisis directly – I’ve discovered that something that may seem as simple as asking a question is such a powerful tool, and even though those questions can at times be difficult to ask and respond to, in the end they usually allow both me and the person I’m working with to work from the same page. Clarity is so important because if we work based on assumptions and implications then there is a lot more room for us to misjudge what the person seeking support is experiencing.

This is but one of the reasons why we shouldn’t shy away from phrases like “suicide crisis”. It’s ok to ask about suicide, and it’s ok to talk about it. At Harmless and The Tomorrow Project, we may be the professionals working with the people, but the people are the experts when it comes to their own thoughts, feelings and crisis. Our job is to listen and to help facilitate change if that person feels ready, not to force people into recovery.

If you feel like you need support around issues relating to self-harm or suicide including being bereaved by suicide, please feel free to contact either Harmless (0115 934 8445) or The Tomorrow Project (0115 934 8447, crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk, bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk) and we will try our best to start supporting you.

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) 15th &16th May – Lincoln

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day interactive workshop in suicide first aid. ASIST teaches participants to recognize when someone may have thoughts of suicide and work with them to create a plan that will support their immediate safety. Although ASIST is widely used by healthcare providers, participants don’t need any formal training to attend the workshop—anyone 16 or older can learn and use the ASIST model.

CLICK HERE TO BOOK NOW

For more details on our next course see below

Harmless do the Mannequin Challenge

Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 

 

Sophie Allen speaks to the BBC in light of the recent NPSCC article about the worrying rise in self harm admissions to hospital

You may have seen or heard on the news last Friday, an article from NSPCC about how the rate of hospital admissions for self harm is frighteningly high, with an estimated 19,000 children being admitted to hospital for self harm, which saw an increase of 14% over a 3 year period.

The NSPCC’s figures, collected from all but six NHS Trusts in England and health boards in Wales, reveal that 18,788 under-18s were admitted to hospital or treated at accident and emergency units for self-harm in 2015-16.

This compares with 16,416 admissions for self-harm in 2013-14

As a result of this article coming out, Harmless were contacted by various media sources, wanting to gather more information, or speak to individuals with lived experience or self harm, in order to provide some valuable insight into the causes of self harm, why people adopt this behaviour and also, most importantly, what can be done to support individuals in distress.

My first interview was with BBC Radio 5 live Breakfast Show, very early on Friday morning, speaking to Nicky Campbell and then I appeared on the drive time show later on in the day too, with Verity Cowley. Within this, I talked about my lived experience of self harm, but also my journey of recovery. It is important to provide hope to others. I shared many things, such as what led me to self harm, how it made me feel, but also, more generally the challenges that we, as a service, come across day in day out. I discussed the importance of having these conversations in order to breakdown the taboo around self harm. I also stated the importance of trying to understand self harm and what needs to happen to drive change.

If you want to listen to my piece on the Breakfast show or the drive time show, they can be heard on the links provided, http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b084crrn and http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04gj501

TP Crisis Pathway

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential,
community based suicide prevention service

The Tomorrow Project launched two new pathways on the 12th September; suicide crisis and suicide bereavement. Working at The Tomorrow Project on the suicide crisis pathway has opened up eyes and hearts to those in need.

There were 6,122 suicides of people aged 10 and over registered in the UK in 2014 as published by the office for national statistics. This is 6,122 more than there should have been.

We have seen the referrals and interest in this pathway grow and grow, this emphasises the importance of the project. After seeing the difference, one chat and one cup of tea can make. When a client comes in full of distress and sadness, to leaving filled with hope for the next day, and the days after that. Not only have you possibly filled someone’s day with a little bit of joy, you’ve maybe saved a life.

The work we do here at the Tomorrow Project Crisis Pathway is vital. We help clients keep engaged in their lives, we work towards making their situations better, both practically and emotionally, but most of all, we offer compassion. We offer support. We offer validation. We fight the stigmas that surround suicide. We remind people they aren’t the bad that happened to them. They are important. They are valid. They are loved.

If you need any support, please contact crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk or call 0115 9348447, leaving a message including your name, contact details and a crisis worker will contact you within 1 working day.