World Mental Health Day 2017

Mental health in the workplace

During our adult lives, a large proportion of our time is spent at work. Our experience in the workplace is one of the factors determining our overall wellbeing. Employers and managers who put in place workplace initiatives to promote mental health and to support employees who have mental disorders see gains not only in the health of their employees but also in their productivity at work.

Mental health in the workplace is the theme of World Mental Health Day 2017.
World Mental Health Day is observed on 10 October every year, with the overall objective of raising awareness of mental health issues and mobilizing efforts in support of better mental health.

1 in 4 of us will experience a mental health problem this year, yet many people still don’t believe problems are likely to affect them, or anyone they know. They also don’t see how the way they think and act can affect others. But mental health problems can affect any of us – directly or otherwise. And without support from those around us, we can lose what we care about most. Having a colleague in your corner can make all the difference.

Without support from others, people with mental health problems can lose what they care about most. It’s a time when you need your friends, family and colleagues more than ever. So, if you notice someone you work with is acting differently, step in. You don’t have to be an expert to be supportive. It can be as simple as checking in with someone, asking them how they’re doing, sharing a cuppa, listening and not judging, just being there and being yourself.

Today we are celebrating World Mental Health Day for the 25th time! World Federation for Mental Health founded the awareness day in 1992 and since then people all over the world are holding events, making announcements and celebrating #WorldMentalHealthDay

Let’s all pledge to do something today to celebration #WorldMentalHealthDay ! The smallest things can make the biggest difference.

Training sessions to break the stigma around self harm

Last week Harmless welcomed 12 lovely delegates for a full day of self harm awareness training. All 12 work with young people, and the training generated a lot of discussion around how we best support children who are struggling with issues around self harm.

We know that school staff work tirelessly to support the young people they work with every day, and that self harm is on the increase. There have been recorded rises in self harm A & E admissions for young people, and we know that suicide is the leading cause of death for young people in the UK.Anything we can do to continue to break the stigma to enable children to talk openly about their distress is going to support our vision to save lives. Training is just one small part of that.

Thank you to the delegates who attended, asked questions, shared their experiences and reminded me that we are very fortunate to have some excellent support for young people in our local schools and colleges.

If you would like information about what training we can provide, please contact us at:

Phone: 0115 934 8446

Email: training@harmless.org.uk

 

Suicide Prevention Service, The Tomorrow Project, hosts an event on 8th September exploring The Tomorrow Projects pathways, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day on September the 10th, 2017.

The Tomorrow Project will be hosting an event exploring the suicide prevention pathways, two days before World Suicide Prevention Day, 2017. Delegates will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories. The Tomorrow Project was established in South Nottinghamshire in 2012 after there were a number of deaths to suicide in a local community. By galvanising local support, bereaved families and professionals, The Tomorrow project was established to deliver services and support to reach people in distress and reduce suicide.

The Tomorrow project will also be hosting an introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide. This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: Identifying risk factors, understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools, establishing current emotional states & behaviours and reviewing & revisiting risk.

Whilst there has been significant attention paid locally and nationally to suicide prevention, it remains a very specialist and under funded piece of work.

The bereaved by suicide also remain an overlooked group. These individuals are at an 80% increased chance of unemployment and a 1 in 10 chance of attempting suicide.

When compared with people bereaved through other causes, those bereaved by suicide are at an increased risk of suicide, psychiatric admission and depression, as well as suicide attempt and poor social functioning.

Penny Johnson, a bereaved mother, lost her son to suicide and says: “The Tomorrow Project is so vital in so many ways. Before my son died, we tried to get him help via the NHS only to be turned away because Jamie was over 18. I pleaded with them to help us, but they said that they couldn’t unless Jamie was the one asking for help but in October, 2012, Jamie took his own life. My family have been in turmoil ever since, each of us needing help in our own way and The Tomorrow Project has been there for us. I don’t know how we would have survived without them.”

The Tomorrow Project’s event is to be held at The Sir Collin Campbell building, September 8th 2017, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day. The team are incredibly excited to be hosting the event and look forward to meeting all attendees tomorrow.

A further ticketed event will be held on the evening of the 7th October at Ruddington Grange in Nottingham to celebrate the work and to raise money for the continuation of life saving work, with a drinks reception, dinner, live music and auction.

Tickets available now via: http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/Harmless-Celebration-2017

Let’s Talk Training

Speak to our friendly and helpful team

Call: 0115 934 8446
Email: training@harmless.org.uk

 

Let’s Talk Training is the training operating arm of established mental health provider Harmless. The service delivers a range of specialist CPD accredited and bespoke training UK wide, including externally accredited Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) courses and Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST).

We deliver courses on the topics of Self harm, Mental health & Suicide prevention. Our training will encourage you to explore your awareness, develop an understanding of the key issues faced by people in distress and by the services that these individuals come into contact with. We will identify the impact that we, as service providers, can potentially have upon the health, well being and recovery of those in distress and promote skills that can used in intervention as well as develop effective signposting skills.

Standards you can expect from the Let’s Talk Training Team…

  • Passionate trainers
  • Interactive deliveries
  • Supportiveness
  • Knowledgeable trainers
  • Flexible bookings and deliveries

Identify the most appropriate learning level for you…

  • Level 4 Specialist
  • Level 3 Advance
  • Level 2 Intermediate
  • Level 1 Introductory

 

Speak to our friendly and helpful team

Call: 0115 934 8446
Email: training@harmless.org.uk

Have you emailed The Tomorrow Project and not received a reply? We’re sorry – We have been having technical issues!

It has come to our attention that emails sent to tomorrow@harmless.org.uk have not been reaching us. Unfortunately, this was due to a  technical issue with the email address that have now been rectified.

We would like to apologise to anyone who has tried to make contact but have not received a reply!

If you have emailed us and not received a response, please email again.

All our other accounts are working fine and have not experience any issues. 

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential, suicide support service offering support to those in suicide crisis and those bereaved and affected by suicide.

If you require crisis or bereavement support, please use the details blow:

 

For crisis support –

crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8447 – please note this number is not a 24hr help line and a project worker will respond within 1 working day

 

For bereavement support -

bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8445

#WSPD Prevention Pathways: FREE Suicide prevention workshops

Join us Friday 8th September for ‘The Story so far…’

CLICK HERE TO BOOK A PLACE 

At this event there will be free training workshops and you will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing  as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories.

Venue
Sir Colin Campbell Building
Wollaton Road
Nottingham
NG8 1BB

Programme

08:30 Registration 
9:00 Welcome 
9:30 The story so far…
10:15 Break 
10:30 Workshop 1
12:00 Lunch 
13:00 Workshop 2
14:30 Break
14:45 Living experience 
15:30 Panel
15:45 Finish 

Lunch & Refreshments provided 

Workshop 1: An Introduction to Suicide crisis intervention
This workshop will establish basic principles around Suicide crisis intervention considering the following areas:
  • Myths & facts about suicide 
  • The impact our attitudes have on a suicide crisis intervention 
  • How to support someone effectively who is in crisis 
  • How to signpost effectively 
Workshop 2: An Introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide

This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: 
  • Identifying risk factors 
  • Understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools
  • Establishing current emotional states & behaviours
  • Reviewing & revisiting risk 

Stranger on the Bridge study: Request for help

This is an opportunity to work with the University of Exeter in their research into how members of the public can help prevent suicide in public places. This work is inspired by Jonny Benjamin’s The Stranger on the Bridge and the University would like to hear from you if you are aged 18 or over, and fall into one of the following groups: 

1.    You have personal experience of attempting or seriously considering taking your own life in a public location and you were prevented from doing so by a stranger.

2.    You have personal experience of trying to prevent someone you didn’t know (a stranger) from taking their own life in a public location.

If you are in doubt about whether your experience fits, please get in touch to talk it through with one of the research team.

For more details see the here on the University of Exeter website, see the Information for Participants (pdf) or email PUBLIS@exeter.ac.uk

Please also share this as widely as you see fit in order to reach others who might be able to take part.

CYCLING TO SAVE LIVES! WE CHALLENGE…YOU!

The circumference of the world is 40,075 kilometres or 24,900 miles. The International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) started Cycle Around The Globe four years ago to see if as a community we can come together. Now four years on from the first success, the next challenge is to cycle 4X around the globe, 163km or 99.60k Mi.

 The challenge is to see if we can all contribute to collectively cycle this distance for World Suicide Prevention Day. Please join us and help us reach this target. It does not matter how far you can cycle, every kilometre or mile will be added to the total and there are no limits, you can cycle at home, in the gym or outside, you can even walk.

 The activity is about global community and spreading awareness of the importance of suicide prevention. In the UK alone there were 6,188 suicides, and this just shows the real need for us as a community to come together.

If you would like to take part click here for the sponsorship form and sign up. Let us know by emailing info@harmless.org.uk or phoning 0115 934 8445.

All the money raised goes directly to Harmless & The Tomorrow Project and provides therapeutic services.

*Official participant printed labels for your t-shirts are available to print off*

Join us and Cycle of WSPD and show the world we are all connected in the aim of preventing suicide.

https://iasp.info/wspd2017/cycle-around-globe/

Suicide Crisis – What does it mean to you?

The word “crisis” in itself is quite an emotive word. For me anyway, when I think of “crisis”, my first image used to be things like panic, immediacy, and fear. It’s defined as “a time of intense difficulty or danger” – this sums it up fairly well, but in this definition there’s no mention of panic or fear – it’s an assumption. While these emotions are commonly present in a person experiencing a crisis, this is not always how that person can present to someone who’s talking to them.

Then, the word “suicide” is also not only an emotive word, but a stigmatised one. We are frequently reluctant to say this word and there’s also a fear of using it, of acknowledging it. I feel this can often be the case for anyone involved; the person themselves, friends and family talking to them about it, as well as professionals involved in their care.

When we then take the phrase “suicide crisis”, this can be a phrase which strikes fear into those involved. But if we’re afraid of the phrase, how can we discuss it openly with someone who is feeling this way? I think it’s really important to be mindful of how a person is experiencing a suicide crisis and how they construe their crisis. While there may be some overlap between people and how they present, there’s fairly often some variance, distinctions, and even contradictions in protective, predisposing etc. factors (e.g., one person’s protective factor could be another person’s precipitating factor).

For me, this interpretation of a suicide crisis makes it all the more important that I ask every person I see not only how they feel, but how they interpret their suicide crisis, what is contributing to it or preventing them from acting on their thoughts, and what made them now want to opt into our crisis pathway.

Within this, I think it’s important to address the person’s experience suicide crisis directly – I’ve discovered that something that may seem as simple as asking a question is such a powerful tool, and even though those questions can at times be difficult to ask and respond to, in the end they usually allow both me and the person I’m working with to work from the same page. Clarity is so important because if we work based on assumptions and implications then there is a lot more room for us to misjudge what the person seeking support is experiencing.

This is but one of the reasons why we shouldn’t shy away from phrases like “suicide crisis”. It’s ok to ask about suicide, and it’s ok to talk about it. At Harmless and The Tomorrow Project, we may be the professionals working with the people, but the people are the experts when it comes to their own thoughts, feelings and crisis. Our job is to listen and to help facilitate change if that person feels ready, not to force people into recovery.

If you feel like you need support around issues relating to self-harm or suicide including being bereaved by suicide, please feel free to contact either Harmless (0115 934 8445) or The Tomorrow Project (0115 934 8447, crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk, bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk) and we will try our best to start supporting you.