Chrissie will be running her first half marathon in September, in aid of The Tomorrow Project.

Chrissie will be running her first half marathon in September, in aid of The Tomorrow Project.

“Hello! I’m Chrissie. I’m currently training for my first half marathon in September. I would like to use this opportunity to raise some much needed funds for a local charity, which is close to a lot of people’s hearts – The Tomorrow Project.”

Chrissie is just 20% away from her target fundraising, can you help?

https://localgiving.org/fundrais…/chrissierobinhoodhalf2018/

Good luck we hope the training is going well Chrissie!

Thank you for choosing to support our life saving service.

Focus on you: a blog from orlaghslittlecorner

I feel like we all must do it. Compare ourselves to others I mean. Looking at their achievements and how far they’ve come, how appealing their life looks and all the things they have got and have done. But you gotta stop that. Seriously.

Comparison is the thief of joy.

It truly is! Whilst you’re comparing you life to someone’s else’s you will always feel lame. There may always be someone who seems to have more than you, but don’t forget that actually your life to someone else will look amazing compared to theirs. It’s a constant battle of people comparing themselves to each other. And it’s got to stop.

Everyone’s path has been/is different in life. Some people have been through a hell of a lot, family issues, personal issues, health issues -you name it! But I’m pretty positive in the fact that every person you could ask would have some story, some bad times in their life, so you can’t let yours be a comparison.

Celebrate people’s joy and how far they have come and be happy for them without comparing yourself!

You will never be able to see how far you have come whilst you are doing that whole ‘compare yourself to others’ thing. Take time to stop and look and realise all the amazing things you have done. How much you have achieved. Compare yourself to yourself. Look at how much you have done, how far you have traveled, how much experience you have gained in a year or 3 years, 5 or 10!

By comparing yourself to yourself you can also set some realistic goals based on where you are in life (and not by where society says you should be!). You know what goals you have to set to make a dream become a plan and whatever time frame that is that fits you, that is the perfect amount.

Throw into the mix some self-care, some you-time, some breaks from life and you will hopefully have a better look on things! ✌🏼

Link to the blog and for more wonderful blogs written byorlaghslittlecorner.wordpress.com

Check out the latest Let’s Talk Training dates on Eventbrite

Let’s Talk Training is holding a range of accredited training dates across the year #CPDaccredited including;
• Level 2 (Frontline) Self harm
• Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training
• Mental Health First Aid Youth
• Mental Health First Aid Adult

For more information or to book on a course please visit Eventbrite:http://harmless.eventbrite.com
For any queries please phone: 0115 880 0281 or email: training@harmless.org.uk

 

Everyone’s business

“The thought…the far off dream…of one day becoming a mother helped me find my way to recovery. I had given up for so long, written off as an ‘expected suicide’ but now I’m expecting my 4th and 5th children and dedicated my life to helping others out of the darkness” Caroline Harroe, CEO.

We have created an Instagram feed sharing the stories of hope in the build up to our photography exhibition.

Please follow @everyones.business

A photography project about suicide, whether you’ve faced your own suicidal thoughts/crisis, been bereaved by suicide or helped someone #thisisallofus

If you would like to take part please email info@harmless.org.uk with your contact details and a brief paragraph about your experiences.

 

In the News: Children turned away from mental health help unless ‘acutely suicidal’, psychotherapists warn

Children are being turned away from psychotherapy unless they are “acutely suicidal”, a report has claimed.

A survey by the Association of Child Psychotherapists found that members were concerned that seriously mentally ill children were not being offered help unless they were threatening to kill themselves.

Child and adolescent psychotherapists working within the NHS said that cases were “having to be re-referred several times and reaching a crisis point before being accepted”, its report found.

One in three of the 416 psychotherapists who responded to the survey said they felt the service they were working within was “mostly inadequate or completely inadequate”, and 73 per cent felt there had been a negative change in staff morale.

Another psychotherapist said that “inadequate resources” were “making it hard to provide service for children in need of mental health support” but who were not “currently suicidal”.

Others warned that even suicidal children were “not followed up due to both inexperience and being overwhelmed”, leading to a growing number of “near misses”.

Children who “may become psychopaths” were among those that practitioners said were turned away for treatment because it was assessed that they “do not yet pose a risk”.

Another respondent said that sexual abuse was “no longer considered a reason for referral”.

In one case study outlined in the report, a girl who was threatening to kill herself by jumping from a window was not prioritised for treatment because it was decided that she was safe because “her mother was checking the windows”.

Respondents to the survey also said that specialist staff were increasingly being replaced by managers or generalists, and mental health services were increasingly using locums and agency staff to fill gaps in provision.

Dr Jon Goldin, vice chair of the child and adolescent psychiatry faculty at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said the report “highlights that many children and young people, especially those with severe and enduring needs, are not receiving the specialist care and treatment they require.

“A well-led multi-disciplinary team of experienced clinicians is crucial to the delivery of high quality services and the report shows that this is lacking in many areas.”

Dr Goldin backed calls by the association for a review of specialist services.

Dr Marc Bush, head of policy at mental health charity YoungMinds, said: “Every day we get calls to our helpline from parents whose children have been waiting months for an appointment with CAMHS, or who have been turned down because the thresholds for treatment are so high.

“The system is overstretched and disjointed, with a devastating impact on thousands of families across the country.”

The report comes after concerns were raised by the most senior family judge in England and Wales as the NHS struggled to find a mental health place for a suicidal teenage girl.

Sir James Munby warned last August that the nation would have “blood on our hands” if a specialist hospital bed could not be found for the 17-year-old, who was due to be released from youth custody and had made a number of “determined” attempts on her life.

 

Our service was set up because of these desperate gaps in provision. This is why the work we do is so essential and life saving.

If you would like to support our life saving work with a donation please click here: https://localgiving.org/donation/harmless

If you would like to book onto one of our training courses please click here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/harmless-lets-talk-training-14795237737

 

Link to full blog: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/06/25/children-turned-away-mental-health-help-unless-acutely-suicidal/

 

In the News: Mental health services for the young is NHS’s ‘silent catastrophe’

Failings in treatment of children and young people with mental health problems is a “silent catastrophe” within the NHS and is due to chronic underfunding and serious structural issues, a report by the Association of Child Psychotherapists (ACP) claims.

The report, which exposes a “serious and worsening crisis” for the health service through a survey of those working in child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs), says trusts are being hollowed out and specialist services are disappearing owing to underfunding and the transformation and redesign of services in recent years.

The results are rising levels of suicide, self-referral to A&E departments and pressure on in-patient units, it says.

The number of children and adolescents failing to receive the right treatment or “fully slipping through the cracks” is on the rise, the report says. But Camhs funding is only part of the problem, with specialist services moving “towards something of much less quality and rigour”, it adds.

The survey of 416 frontline NHS child and adolescent child psychotherapists found the worst affected patients were those with the most severe and long-standing needs.

Specialist services are disappearing, and senior clinical roles and disciplines are being dismantled, leading to pressure on lower-banded staff, the report says.

Treatment is focused on symptoms rather than the whole child or young person in context, it continues. Children and young people are left to “get worse before being seen” and there is an “increasing mismatch between need and treatment offered”.

Competitive tendering has led to “unrealistic and under-funded service models” and left services fragmented and staff isolated, it says.

The failings have led to high staff turnover, poor morale and poor working conditions. One child psychotherapist, who wished to remain anonymous, said: “I am considering leaving the NHS as I am worried it is no longer safe to practise.

“It is tragic to witness the demise of a once-flourishing and truly multi-disciplinary specialist Camhs. My skills are going to waste.

“Once the service was taken over by a new trust, the service was redesigned and now does not meet the needs of a large section of the population who have significant mental health needs. There is no time for proper assessments and treatment.

“Specialist treatment for the most vulnerable children offered by child psychotherapists and others survives despite, not because, of service design.”

The ACP said it wanted to shift debate from recognition there was a crisis in Camhs to an understanding of the factors and forces ”behind our collective failure to respond to it”.

This year, the NHs watchdog the Care Quality Commission rated 39% (26 services) of specialist Camhs as requiring improvement. Those surveyed by the ACP were asked whether they could see any evidence of the government’s claim of making “one of the biggest expansion of services in Europe” – 93 % of respondents said they saw no evidence of this.

Dr Nick Waggett, the chief executive of the ACP, said the report showed the lack of funding, and the loss of clinical expertise and leadership in the recent redesigns of the service could lead to patients not being offered the effective and timely assessment and treatment they required.

Dr Marc Bush, the head of policy at the charity YoungMinds, said: “Every day we get calls to our helpline from parents whose children have been waiting months for an appointment with Camhs, or who have been turned down because the thresholds for treatment are so high. The system is overstretched and disjointed, with a devastating impact on thousands of families across the country.”

He added that there was a need for increased spending and greater recognition of specialist roles.

The survey of frontline NHS Camhs staff suggests a deterioration of specialist services:

  • 61% of respondents said the main NHS service they work in was facing downsizing
  • 72% said the threshold for access to services has increased in the past five years
  • 33% described services as mostly inadequate or completely inadequate
  • 73% reported a down-banding of specialist clinical posts
  • 64% reported negative changes in the number of practitioner posts
  • 62% in sessions per client
  • 65% in the frequency of sessions
  • 73% said they felt there had been a negative change in staff morale.

 

Our service was set up because of these desperate gaps in provision. This is why the work we do is so essential and life saving.

If you would like to support our life saving work with a donation please click here: https://localgiving.org/donation/harmless

If you would like to book onto one of our training courses please click here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/harmless-lets-talk-training-14795237737

 

Link to full blog: https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jun/25/mental-health-services-young-nhs-silent-catastrophe-survey-chronic-underfunding

An enormous thank you to the Astraseal Mastics team for raising over £500 to support our life saving service!

An enormous thank you to the Astraseal Mastics team for raising over £500 to support our life saving service!

The team comprised of Andrew Almond, Karen Almond, Stephanie Eastham, Sean McPartlin, Jack McPartlin, Wayne Jolly, Ceyhan Crosthwaite and Scott Spiby.

They took on a 5 mile obstacle course in Preston, Lancashire on the 10th June 2018. This course has been designed and built by Royal Marine Commandos and Army engineers and was predicted to be a very fun and challenging course.

“Over the past few years each one of us has experienced the effects of losing somebody close due to suicide and we would like to provide support to other people who have found themselves in a similar situation and are feeling the loss of losing somebody special.”

The fantastic team came first and second place in their wave time, with one completed in 50 minutes! It was a scorching hot day of around 25 degrees so an incredibly challenging course. The team has done so well and we are so proud!

They have managed to raise a whopping £546.25. 100% of this will help us save lives.

A huge well done from the whole team here at Harmless and an even bigger thank you

for supporting our service.

#LifeSavers

In The News: James Arthur says stars have ‘responsibility’ to talk about mental health as he talks about his struggle with depression

James Arthur has opened up about his mental health, and explained people in the public eye need to do more to help others speak out. The Say You Won’t Let Go singer – who won X Factor back in 2012 – has struggled with anxiety and depression in the past. And, during an appearance on Lorraine, the 30-year-old urged others to be more open about their own battles. ‘I think people in the spotlight have a huge responsibility to talk about these things,’ he confessed.
 
‘I remember when I was really badly suffering with anxiety and depression, internalising all of that was the catalyst amongst all that. It led to lot of bad decisions in my life.’ James is now an ambassador for charity Sane, and wants to get rid of the stigma that surrounds talking about mental health issues. ‘The best medicine is to speak about these things,’ he continued. ‘If those of us in the spotlight can encourage that, I think it’s a great thing. ‘The X Factor feels like a million years ago, but I’m still talking about it. Within a matter of six months I went from a guy who was robbing milk from the corner shop to this… ‘I’m settled now, I’m used to the madness of this life now. I embrace the uncertainty.
 
 
‘I want to be the best I can possibly be.’ The You Deserve Better singer also credited his friends with helping him become more grounded in his success. And he admitted it’s because they are not afraid to call him out on his behaviour.
 
‘100% [you need your friends]. I’m the best version of myself when I’m around my mates,’ he added. ‘It’s always where I feel the most myself. I feel like my feet are on the ground. They’re the first to say, “Who do you think you are? Behave.” ‘You’ve got to have someone to bring you back down to earth.’
 
 
Link to full blog: https://metro.co.uk/2018/06/22/james-arthur-says-stars-responsibility-talk-mental-health-talks-struggle-depression-7651262/

Estimating suicide among higher education students, England and Wales: Experimental Statistics – Office for National

The Office of National Statistics has recently released a new paper on suicides among higher education students in England and Wales. Here are the key points of the paper….
 
 
• The rate of suicide in the 12 months ending July 2017 for higher education students in England and Wales was 4.7 deaths per 100,000 students, which equates to 95 suicides; this is higher than in most of the earlier years studied, although the small numbers per year make it difficult to identify statistically significant differences.
 
• Between the 12 months ending July 2013 and the 12 months ending July 2016, higher education students in England and Wales had a significantly lower suicide rate compared with the general population of similar ages.
 
• Male higher education students had a significantly higher rate of suicide compared with female students.
 
• The number of suicides in the analysis is lower than previous Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates of student suicides; this is likely to be because this analysis focuses on higher education students only, while the ONS previous estimates will cover other students, for example, those in further education.
 
For the full paper please click here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/estimatingsuicideamonghighereducationstudentsenglandandwalesexperimentalstatistics/2018-06-25

One in four UK employees who seek help for mental health issues delays getting treatment because they do not understand their symptoms.

Research from private healthcare group Bupa examined employees’ understanding of psychological and behavioural symptoms of six of the most prevalent mental health conditions in the UK.
 
More than 70m working days are lost each year in the UK due to mental health problems, statistics from the Mental Health Foundation show.
 
The Bupa research shows that inaccurate assumptions caused almost 7m to delay seeking support for a mental health problem.
Although the findings show that general awareness of mental health issues have improved among nearly three quarters of workers over the last five years, knowledge of symptoms is still lacking, with six in 10 (59 per cent) unable to name the main traits of specific conditions.
 
More than 70m working days are lost each year in the UK due to mental health problems, statistics from the Mental Health Foundation show.
 
The Bupa research shows that inaccurate assumptions caused almost 7m to delay seeking support for a mental health problem.
Although the findings show that general awareness of mental health issues have improved among nearly three quarters of workers over the last five years, knowledge of symptoms is still lacking, with six in 10 (59 per cent) unable to name the main traits of specific conditions.
 
Bipolar is the most misunderstood condition with 85 per cent of people unable to identify the symptoms of lacking energy, feeling sad, hopeless and irritable, and having difficulty concentrating. Other symptoms include elevated mood and hyperactivity.
Nine out of 10 (91%) are able to identify the key symptoms of depression and nearly half (49%) are able to recognise the most common signs of anxiety which include restlessness, a sense of dread or insomnia.
 
Link to full article here: http://www.cityam.com/288003/one-four-employees-delays-seeking-help-mental-health