Speak up and speak out about stress!

Today is National Stress Awareness Day 
#INSAD2017 and #internationalstressawarenessday

 

 Join us, Monday 13th November for our Self-care in the workplace training workshop 9:30-13:30, Nottingham 

 This CPD-accredited course will improve your awareness of positive self-care strategies for staff, carers and clients, how to promote and maintain emotional wellbeing, and identifying risks to resilience, particularly in relation to workplace stress and “burnout”.

 The course uses a variety of interactive tools to build delegates’ confidence in reducing workplace stressencouraging self-care, and effectively signposting individuals to support.

This course is open to anyone who would like to explore more about self-care in the workplace.

 To book a place click here.

Work related stress, anxiety and depression statistics in Great Britain 2016

The latest estimates from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show:

  • The total number of cases of work related stress, depression or anxiety in 2015/16 was 488,000 cases, a prevalence rate of 1510 per 100,000 workers. 
  • By occupation, jobs that are common across public service industries (such as healthcare workers; teaching professionals; business, media and public service professionals) show higher levels of stress as compared to all jobs.
  • The main work factors cited by respondents as causing work related stress, depression or anxiety (LFS) were workload pressures, including tight deadlines and too much responsibility and a lack of managerial support

Start Living….

1. START TO PUT YOURSELF FIRST

2. START TO PRIORITISE TASKS

3. START TO MAKE TIME TO RELAX & MENATLLY UNWIND

4. START TO EMPATHISE WITH OTHERS

5. START TO LIVE LIFE TOTHE FULL

Stop Stressing….

6. STOP IGNORING YOUR NEEDS

7. STOP GETTING DISTRACTED

8. STOP ALLOWING OTHERS TO MAKE YOU FEEL INFERIOR

9. STOP BEING JUDGMENTAL

10. STOP AVOIDING THE THINGS YOU LEAST WANT TO DO

 

Let’s Talk Training

Speak to our friendly and helpful team

Call: 0115 934 8446
Email: training@harmless.org.uk

 

Let’s Talk Training is the training operating arm of established mental health provider Harmless. The service delivers a range of specialist CPD accredited and bespoke training UK wide, including externally accredited Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) courses and Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST).

We deliver courses on the topics of Self harm, Mental health & Suicide prevention. Our training will encourage you to explore your awareness, develop an understanding of the key issues faced by people in distress and by the services that these individuals come into contact with. We will identify the impact that we, as service providers, can potentially have upon the health, well being and recovery of those in distress and promote skills that can used in intervention as well as develop effective signposting skills.

Standards you can expect from the Let’s Talk Training Team…

  • Passionate trainers
  • Interactive deliveries
  • Supportiveness
  • Knowledgeable trainers
  • Flexible bookings and deliveries

Identify the most appropriate learning level for you…

  • Level 4 Specialist
  • Level 3 Advance
  • Level 2 Intermediate
  • Level 1 Introductory

 

Speak to our friendly and helpful team

Call: 0115 934 8446
Email: training@harmless.org.uk

Stop saying yes when you want to say no

We’ve all been there…that moment when you’re asked to do something you don’t want to do or even have the time to do….you want to say no….but before you know it, the word ‘yes’ has already come out your mouth.

Don’t worry, you really aren’t alone in that. We’ve been thinking about why we find it so important to please everyone, to the point where we feel overwhelmed and stressed out. Pleasing others can be self-serving. But I wonder if the benefits to saying yes are outweighed by the negative impact on our mental health.

By agreeing to do things that you don’t want to could mean that you are a people pleaser, which is not a bad trait, but can cause a lot of stress and anxiety. People pleasers think about other people’s needs, worry about what other people want or think before they think about their own needs, or what they want. 

Learning to say “no” is is about setting boundaries. Every time you say “yes” to someone, you say “no” to yourself and your priorities and needs. It is far worse to say “yes” then to feel your anxiety building up. Forget about pleasing people. It is more important to please yourself so that you can stay calm and relaxed.

Practice saying “no”. Say it aloud so you can hear the words in your own voice. Say phrases with “no” in them, such as, “No, I can’t do that.”

Never say yes on the spot. Instead say “I’ll get back to you” after you’ve checked if you actually can do it. Or how about “Let me think about it and ill speak to you tomorrow”.

You do not need to say “yes” just because you are capable of doing something. You should say “yes” only if you considered your time availability, other commitments and what you may need to give up to complete the job.

Put your self-care above anything else by spending your time on things that make you happy and on decisions that you want, rather than on what others want. If you don’t set boundaries to what or whom you will say no to, your health is at stake. If you neglect yourself, you will not be able to help your family or those that care about you.

You don’t even need to apologies for saying no.

Remember that your self-worth does not depend on how much you do for other people.

Have you heard of mindfulness?


Mindfulness meditation consists of focusing your full attention on your breath as it flows in and out of your body. Focusing on each breath in this way allows you to observe your thoughts as they arise in your mind and, little by little, to let go of struggling with them. You come to realise that thoughts come and go of their own accord; that you are not your thoughts. You can watch as they appear in your mind, seemingly from thin air, and watch again as they disappear, like a soap bubble bursting. You come to the profound understanding that thoughts and feelings (including negative ones) are transient. They come and they go, and ultimately, you have a choice about whether to act on them or not.

 

Benefits of mindfulness

Stress less

Research suggests that in-person Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) programs may help manage stress. In fact, a systematic review of 17 MBSR studies found the program to be effective in reducing psychological and physiological symptoms of stress.

Sleep better

A meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials for insomnia found that eight weeks of in-person meditation training significantly improved total waking time and sleep quality in patients with insomnia.

Happier, healthier relationships

A study evaluating the benefits of an in-person mindfulness-based relationship enhancement program suggests that mindfulness enhances couples’ levels of relationship satisfaction, autonomy, closeness and acceptance of each other, while reducing relationship distress. In fact, three months after participating in the study, couples were still experiencing these improvements.

Manage anxiety

Anxiety currently affects about one in fourteen people worldwide. That’s 7.3% of the total world population. A systematic review of in-person meditation training found that 69% of the studies analyzed showed meditation practice alleviated symptoms of anxiety.

Sharpen concentration

Findings suggest that meditating for just four days is enough to improve novice meditators’ working memory, executive functions and their ability to process visual information.

Have you heard of Headspace app? It’s an app that’s built for guided mindfulness meditation.

Headspace has one mission: to improve the health and happiness of the world.

You can try Headspace for yourself and learn the essentials of meditation and mindfulness with the free Basics pack. If you enjoy it, you have the option to subscribe. Once you do, you’ll have bite-sized minis for when you’re short on time, singles to add some extra mindfulness to your day, and hundreds of meditations for everything from stress to sleep.

The techniques used within the Headspace app have been refined and developed over many centuries. Their aim is to cultivate awareness and compassion so we can better understand both the mind and the world around us.

Research onto the effectiveness of the app:

https://www.headspace.com/science/meditation-research

Who’s up for a walk?

Science shows that spending time outdoors can actually make you healthier.

Escaping to the woods, mountains or even your local park positively supports both your body and your mind. And psychologists and health researchers are finding more and more science-backed reasons we should spend time outside.

Research conducted at the University of Essex showed that the colour green, such as that found on trees, grass and other plants in nature, makes exercise feel easier. The small study tested cyclists pedalling in front of green, grey and red images. Those exercising in front of the green showed less mood disturbances and reported that they felt lower exertion during their cycling.

Most of us are aware that a quick walk around the block does wonders for the mind. But what a new study reveals is that if you want to come back with your brain power enhanced, the scenery en route really matters.

Not only this…..as taking a stroll can also increase creativityResearch published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology found that walking increases creative production. And while walking anywhere — whether through the woods or in town — is beneficial in that it prompts creativity.

Spending time in nature has been shown to lower stress levels so what are we waiting for? Who’s joining us on a scenic walk?

Better yet….why not join us on our Cycling the Globe? Have a look at the poster below!