From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Pam Burrows

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Pam Burrows has been speaking professionally for over 25 years in the public sector, third sector and in the commercial world. Previously delivering business skills workshops globally to blue chip companies, for the last 17 years she has focused closer to home on the value of boosting the confidence, energy and positivity of people.

In 2015 Pam won a European OSHA award with Nottingham City Homes for reducing stress in the workplace and also became a Fellow of the Professional Speaking Association.

Pam is a qualified Nursery Nurse, Social Worker and Master Practitioner in Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP). She appears regularly on TV and BBC Radio and has produced 2 short films on social issues.

She is taking far too long to write a book and to fill the gap has recently produced an Android and iOS app with free confidence boosting resources. Pam wears a tutu when the mood takes her, gives up sugar and takes it up again on a regular basis and quite likes hugging trees when no-one’s looking.

From Harm to Hope Conference

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

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From Harm to Hope: Introducing the speakers

Marie Armstrong

Marie Armstrong is a Nurse Consultant leading the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Self-harm Service in Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust. She has over 29 years’ experience working across the four tiers of CAMHS and in 2000 was appointed as the first CAMHS Nurse Consultant in the UK. Her current role includes 50% direct clinical practice as well as research, teaching, professional leadership, consultation and service development. She has developed and implemented good practice guidelines for the management of young people who self-harm, contributed to the NICE guidelines on self-harm and speaks at conferences. As well as being qualified in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Nursing Marie is also a UKCP registered Systemic Family/Psychotherapist.   

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From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Professor Louis Appleby

Louis Appleby graduated in medicine in Edinburgh and subsequently trained in hospital medicine and psychiatry, the latter at the Institute of Psychiatry, London. He has an MD from Edinburgh and is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of both Physicians and Psychiatrists. He has held research grants totalling £15.5m from the Wellcome Trust, MRC, Department of Health and other NHS sources.

Louis leads the Centre for Mental Health and Safety, investigating suicide and self-harm, violence and forensic services, the largest research unit in this field internationally.  Its findings have been the basis of Government policy on suicide prevention and are widely quoted by governments, professionals and charities.  From 2000-2010 Louis was seconded (part-time) as the Government’s National Director for Mental Health to lead a national programme of reform in mental health care in England and from 2010-2014 he was National Clinical Director for Health and Criminal Justice. 

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From Harm to Hope Conference

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.
As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Claire Dixon

Claire has been a specialist trainer with Harmless since November 2016. She previously coordinated and delivered healthy relationship work in secondary schools for domestic abuse prevention charity Equation.

Claire volunteered with Samaritans for five years as a listening volunteer, trainer, and coordinator for HMP Nottingham’s Listeners Scheme.

Claire’s passion for training in this sector comes through experience working with young people and schools, as well as personal experience of self harm, suicide and mental health problems. Through training, she hopes to further promote awareness and challenge stigma around self harm, mental health and suicide.

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From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Dr Alys Cole-King

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Alys Cole-King is a Consultant Liason Psychiatrist who maintains a clinical and public health role within the NHS. She works nationally with Royal Colleges, voluntary bodies, academics, and experts by experience to raise awareness of suicide and self-harm. She promotes the need for compassion, collaboration, improved governance and promotes a common language to ensure an improved and more integrated response to people at risk of suicide. A contributor to the All Party Parliamentary Group for Suicide and Self-harm Prevention, Alys is also on the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Mental Health Training Advisory Group, and has contributed to their curriculum. Alys leads international campaigns via social media and works with the media to ensure a compassionate and safe approach to suicide prevention.

As Connecting with People Clinical Director, Alys led the development of Connecting with People’s Suicide Assessment Framework E-Tool (SAFETool). This approach is based on more than 20 years clinical experience, a thorough review of published evidence and a full time research project using psychological autopsy technique to investigate factors relating to episodes of self-harm or suicide attempts. Alys is a primary author of a number of papers, book chapters, webinars, podcasts, blogs and self-help resources on suicide and self-harm prevention, Alys has also contributed to the RCGP e-learning module on suicide prevention and delivered a BMJ Masterclass Webinar on suicide mitigation. Alys sits on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Compassionate Health Care, is a reviewer for several journals and sits on the international Expert Reference group advising Griffiths University academics, a WHO Collaborating Centre on responding to professionals who have experienced the suicide of a patient.

 

From Harm to Hope Conference: 

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

BOOK NOW

In the news: Police receive new powers to search people with mental health needs

Guidance issued to police will see many new changes in the way police respond to call outs from December 11. Police will now be expected to “keep” individuals at a ‘place of safety’ (including, potentially, their home) rather than move them to hospitals or police station, which what has typically happened to date. 

Police are to receive new powers next month to search people with mental health needs. The new search power allows police officers to search people in distress when section 135 or 136 (‘sectioning’) orders are imposed. Mental Health Today were first last week to reveal 1,000 people vulnerable people were detained in police cells last year. New guidance released by the Department of Health reveals police will now be given the powers to carry out searches for “their own safety”. 

Guidance issued to police today will see many new changes in the way police respond to call outs from December 11 onwards:

• section 136 powers may now be exercised anywhere other than in a private
dwelling

• it is now unlawful to use a police station as a place of safety for anyone under the age of 18 in any circumstances

• a police station can now only be used as a place of safety for adults in specific circumstances, which are set out in regulations

• the previous maximum detention period of up to 72 hours has been reduced to 24 hours (unless a doctor certifies that an extension of up to 12 hours is necessary)

• before exercising a section 136 power police officers must, where practicable, consult one of the health professionals listed in section 136(1C), or in regulations made under that provision

• a person subject to section 135 or 136 can be kept at, as well as removed to, a place of safety. Therefore, where a section 135 warrant has been executed, a person may be kept at their home (if it is a place of safety) for the purposes of an assessment rather than being removed to another place of safety

• a new search power allows police officers to search persons subject to section 135 or 136 powers for protective purposes.

Link to full blog here: https://www.mentalhealthtoday.co.uk/breaking-police-receive-new-powers-to-search-people-with-mental-health-needs

 

 

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Caroline Harroe, CEO, Harmless

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Caroline is Harmless’ CEO and one of its co-founders, launching the service in 2007 with fellow Director Amy, and ensuring the service has gone from strength to award winning strength.

Caroline has over 15 years’ experience in the field of self harm and mental health. A practicing psychotherapist and a tireless campaigner for equality for those experiencing mental health difficulties. Caroline is currently completing her PhD, is an elected member of the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and is involved in many local and national suicide prevention strategy and research projects.

Leading with experience, Caroline overcame her personal experience of self harm and mental health problems and after a long battle to overcome these difficulties, she now hopes to inspire hope in others by sharing her recovery.

From Harm to Hope Conference: 

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

BOOK NOW

A Message from Dr. Noah

 

Harmless has been in service for 10 years and here’s what Noah had to say about it

If you support what we do please donate on our local giving page

 £25 One therapy session

£45 Information session drop in

£80 A talk at a school

Mental Health First Aid Youth (MHFAYouth)

 31st August & 1st September £120 per delegate 
Certificate and resources for each delegate upon completion
Please note: Attendance on both days of the workshop is mandatory

Youth MHFA is a course aimed at people who come into contact with young people aged 8 to 18. The 2 day workshop will be delivered by a fully trained certified MHFA Trainer.

Course Aims:

  • Preserve life
  • Prevent deterioration of any injury or illness
  • Promote healing and recovery
  • Provide comfort to the ill or injured.

What are the main benefits of Youth MHFA for me?

Youth MHFA will give you the skills to be able to support young people with mental conditions in crisis. While you will be unable to diagnose mental health conditions, Youth MHFA teaches you how to recognise symptoms of mental ill health, how to support someone in a crisis using an effective model enabling a young person to access appropriate professional help. You will also learn that recovery is likely and indeed possible.

Why is Youth MHFA beneficial to my organisation?

This is not just a training course to take and forget. Independent research shows that up to 88% of people use the first aid skills they learn during the course at least once.

  • Your direct actions will help young people to recover faster from mental and emotional health problems – and some of you will even help to prevent suicides.
  • Suicide is the second most common cause of death for those aged 15 – 24
  • Youth MHFA has been designed and proved to equip you with the right skills to help others  
  • Youth MHFA teaches you how to approach those difficult conversations or situations
  • Provides helpful tips to improve your own mental wellbeing
  • Having conversation about mental health helps to break down the barriers of stigma, discrimination and social inequalities
Venue: 
Our Lady of Perpetual Succour Community Centre,
90 Brooklyn Rd,
Nottingham
NG6 9ES
 
To book on or for more information email: training@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8446 

Ideal for psychology graduate/undergraduate

#1. Service provision mapping.

As a mental health service in the third sector it is vital our work:

  • Responds to need
  • Doesn’t duplicate other service 

In order to do this in the changing face of services it is vital for us to establish where other services specifications start and stop, and where best we respond to gaps in provision to meet the needs of those experiencing mental distress, self harm and suicide. 

The research intern will identify all relevant statutory services and establish their service specifications (through request or FOI) drawing a visual representation of coverage for both adults and young people in each locality area to demonstrate Harmless’ service fit and business case. 

Applicants can apply by emailing caroline@harmless.org.uk

 

#2. The research intern will work to establish the business case for Harmless and The Tomorrow Projects service. 

As such they will:

A) look at the usage of service (who, what, how) to establish who we are helping and of these, who are eligible or ineligible for other services. 

B) what impact we are having on their outcomes in the short term and longer term, undertaking analysis of in-service and follow data.

The intern will produce a report to document the client journey, the impact received from receipt of service and their changed outcomes because of this. The intern may also use narrative of the clients to tell this story. 

All data collected to evidence this journey has ethical clearance from Nottingham University. 

Ideal for psychology graduate/undergraduate 

Applicants can apply by emailing caroline@harmless.org.uk