Mental Health First Aid Youth (MHFAYouth)

 31st August & 1st September £120 per delegate 
Certificate and resources for each delegate upon completion
Please note: Attendance on both days of the workshop is mandatory

Youth MHFA is a course aimed at people who come into contact with young people aged 8 to 18. The 2 day workshop will be delivered by a fully trained certified MHFA Trainer.

Course Aims:

  • Preserve life
  • Prevent deterioration of any injury or illness
  • Promote healing and recovery
  • Provide comfort to the ill or injured.

What are the main benefits of Youth MHFA for me?

Youth MHFA will give you the skills to be able to support young people with mental conditions in crisis. While you will be unable to diagnose mental health conditions, Youth MHFA teaches you how to recognise symptoms of mental ill health, how to support someone in a crisis using an effective model enabling a young person to access appropriate professional help. You will also learn that recovery is likely and indeed possible.

Why is Youth MHFA beneficial to my organisation?

This is not just a training course to take and forget. Independent research shows that up to 88% of people use the first aid skills they learn during the course at least once.

  • Your direct actions will help young people to recover faster from mental and emotional health problems – and some of you will even help to prevent suicides.
  • Suicide is the second most common cause of death for those aged 15 – 24
  • Youth MHFA has been designed and proved to equip you with the right skills to help others  
  • Youth MHFA teaches you how to approach those difficult conversations or situations
  • Provides helpful tips to improve your own mental wellbeing
  • Having conversation about mental health helps to break down the barriers of stigma, discrimination and social inequalities
Venue: 
Our Lady of Perpetual Succour Community Centre,
90 Brooklyn Rd,
Nottingham
NG6 9ES
 
To book on or for more information email: training@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8446 

Ideal for psychology graduate/undergraduate

#1. Service provision mapping.

As a mental health service in the third sector it is vital our work:

  • Responds to need
  • Doesn’t duplicate other service 

In order to do this in the changing face of services it is vital for us to establish where other services specifications start and stop, and where best we respond to gaps in provision to meet the needs of those experiencing mental distress, self harm and suicide. 

The research intern will identify all relevant statutory services and establish their service specifications (through request or FOI) drawing a visual representation of coverage for both adults and young people in each locality area to demonstrate Harmless’ service fit and business case. 

Applicants can apply by emailing caroline@harmless.org.uk

 

#2. The research intern will work to establish the business case for Harmless and The Tomorrow Projects service. 

As such they will:

A) look at the usage of service (who, what, how) to establish who we are helping and of these, who are eligible or ineligible for other services. 

B) what impact we are having on their outcomes in the short term and longer term, undertaking analysis of in-service and follow data.

The intern will produce a report to document the client journey, the impact received from receipt of service and their changed outcomes because of this. The intern may also use narrative of the clients to tell this story. 

All data collected to evidence this journey has ethical clearance from Nottingham University. 

Ideal for psychology graduate/undergraduate 

Applicants can apply by emailing caroline@harmless.org.uk

Therapeutic Support Services

Harmless provide free therapeutic support to both adults and young people. Our age range covers from 11 years up to 70 years. We provide both long term and short term therapy:

  • Short term therapy may last up to 12 sessions with reviews.
  • Long term therapy can last up to 2 years with reviews.

We provide short term community outreach therapeutic clinics in for both adults and children for up to 12 sessions.

We offer monthly drop in support sessions creating a relaxed atmosphere, offering information and advice.

  • Young Person (11-21Yrs) Wednesday 31st May 2017 4 – 5 pm
  • Adult (18+ Yrs) Wednesday 7th June 2017 4 – 5 pm.

Drop in sessions are held at Nottingham Community and Voluntary Centre on Mansfield Road (opposite House of Fraser).

We provide monthly a Crisis Café, where people can come along for some informal support.

  • Our next Crisis Café is Wednesday 14th June 3.30 – 4.30 pm

We offer skype provision, so that people from out of the area wishing to receive remote support can have skype sessions.

If you would like any more information, please email us at info@harmless.org.uk.

Harmless: Who we are?

Caroline Harroe CEO summing up what Harmless is all about. To learn more about how Harmless can help you or someone you know email: info@harmless.org.uk 

Harmless Drop In Today

Harmless will be hosting a

Young Person Drop in Session

Wednesday 11th January.

at

4 – 5 pm

If you are aged between 11 – 21 years, and would like support for yourself, a friend or family member then feel free to come along.

Our sessions are friendly and welcoming. We create a relaxed atmosphere with approachable staff who provide important information explaining how our service can support you, your friends and family or a colleague.

Drop in sessions are held at Nottingham Community and Voluntary Centre on Mansfield Road (opposite House of Fraser).

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 8348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

Catch up Café

Harmless will be hosting a Catch up Café

Tuesday 13th December 2016

4.30 – 5.30 pm.

If you are 18 or over, and would like support for yourself, a friend or family member then feel free to come along.

Our sessions are friendly and welcoming. We create a relaxed atmosphere with approachable staff who provide important information explaining how our service can support you, your friends and family or a colleague.

Catch up Café sessions are held at Nottingham Community and Voluntary Centre on Mansfield Road (opposite House of Fraser).

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 8348445 (professional use only) or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

From Harm to Hope, National Harmless Conference

1st March 2017, Nottingham Conference Centre

 JOIN US

Self harm conference 

Our 2nd Annual National Conference looking at effective services for people that self harm, current thinking and implication for practice. 

Themes for the day

- Driving change

-       Collaborative partnership

-       Service user representation

-       Effective practice

-       Overcoming stigma & discrimination

£150 per delegate, CPD certified, Workshops, Food, Speakers, 

COME ONE, COME ALL 

Further enquiries or to book, please contact:
Phone: 0115 934 8445
Email: admin@harmless.org.uk

I would like to introduce James Park to you…

He is writing a book which look at the factors causing young people to self harm, the unhelpful ways in which services sometimes respond to their distress, and the routes people find back to feeling on top of things. 

He has written books before, ran for 20 years an organisation that helped schools promote young people’s mental health and emotional well-being, and is a qualified (but currently non-practising) psychotherapist.

He is happy to talk by phone, over skype, face-to-face… or in any other way that works for you. He will treat whatever you tell him as confidential and, if he does use elements of your story in the book, will ensure you cannot be identified.

You can get in touch with James by email (jamesrobertpark@icloud.com), by phone (0771 201 3172) or via Adrienne Grove at Harmless on 01158348445 or email adrienne@harmless.org.uk 

Please take a little time to read his email below and help him to get the correct messages across. If you have any questions please give me or James a call. This is our chance to be heard..

Adults not listening: will you tell me your story?

Ask a young person who sometimes self-harms, or thinks of killing themselves, what it is they most crave from the adults around them, and the chances are they’ll say it’s the opportunity to be really listened to. They may add that really listening is something their parents, teachers and others seem to find it really, really hard to do.

All too often, what adults call listening is actually telling: getting in first with a response to what they think a young person is wanting to say: trying to reassure them that they are loved, have the potential to do well in school, will get better in time. They challenge rather than absorb, try to map a shortcut to health rather than being attentive to the thoughts struggling to be expressed.

The effect on the young person is all too often to plunge them back into the despair they thought they were starting to claw their way out of. Asking to be listened to can be an act of considerable courage. It’s about starting to create a small space in which you can feel in control of your own life, evolving a language to express the strange feelings that toss you around: listening to your true self instead of the angry, reproachful voices in your head. Being talked back to just confirms what you feared all along: that you are powerless and undeserving.

In looking for an explanation of why so many young people today are experiencing such high levels of emotional distress, I suspect the answer is to be found in the fact that adults are finding it harder to listen. There are too many anxieties knocking around in their heads: particularly about whether there’s going to be work available for their child, a decent income to be earned: all of which is seen to be dependent on whether a child will get those grades they are going to need. And that’s before a child has started cutting themselves or opening top-floor windows with the thought that they might jump into oblivion.

Another way adults deal with their anxieties is handing the responsibility for listening to their child on to someone else. But while a therapist or counsellor may provide welcome respite, may foster the courage to go back and ask again… and again … for the right to be heard, they cannot replace having a parent who listens quietly … over many hours and days … to what it is their child is trying to make sense of.

And when an adult thinks they have been listening, and has done the caring thing by finding a professional to help, the next time they hear the child telling them they have not been heard, they may inadvertently, in a few unfortunate seconds, express exasperation or frustration, sparking a further downward spiral as the young person turns away, towards some other strategy for managing their despair.

I am writing a book about how we, as a society, can break these cycles of failed communication. To do that I want to hear your stories: whether of asking to be listened to from people who could not respond, or of finding a listener who helped you to health; of trying to listen but failing, or of finding a way to do so. Please get in touch via email (jamesrobertpark@icloud.com) or phone (0771 201 3172). I look forward to hearing from you.

All the best,

James

Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

We are currently recruiting for a number of positions within the organisation to join our specialist self harm and suicide prevention team.

To download an application form and job description for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant links below. For more information please email info@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only). Please include which job you are applying for in your email.

Positions:

  • Therapist
  • Suicide Bereavement Project Worker
  • Suicide Crisis Project Worker

Applications close at 5pm on Monday 2nd January 2017.

First interviews to be held w/c 9th January 2017.

Second interviews to be held w/c 16th January 2017.

More information on all positions can be found at the following links:

To download our application form, please click here.

To download the job descriptions for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant link below:

Thank you to Children In Need for supporting our young people self harm services

Tonight (18th November 2016) we will see the return of BBC Children in Need’s appeal show – an annual event which looks to raise money that will be used to make a real difference to the lives of disadvantaged children across the UK.

Since their first major Appeal in 1980, BBC Children in Need has raised over £800 million supporting thousands of projects to help achieve their vision; that every child in the UK has a childhood which is safe, happy and secure and allows them the chance to reach their potential.

Harmless are one of the many projects that have benefited from the money raised by the public and Children In Need.

In 2012, Harmless were awarded £88,910 over a 3 year period and supported more than 300 young people aged 11 to 18 who self-harm (or are at risk of self-harm).

In 2015, Harmless were awarded a further £109,489 to provide weekly counselling support for those who self harm or are at risk of suicide. We are now in our second year having already directly supported 63 different children and young people across Nottingham in year 1.

Earlier this year, Children In Need also created a short video about the work Harmless do which you can watch here: [Insert Link]

On behalf the Harmless team, I would like to thank Children in Need and their team for the continued support that they have given to Harmless and the children and young people that access our service(s). We wish everyone all the best and hope that they have another record breaking evening.

Darren Fox
Business and Operations Manager

 

To view an animation created by BBC Children in Need and Harmless, please click Bronwyn’s Story.

Watch Appeal Show 2015 on BBC One from 7:00pm on Friday 18th November

You can donate to Children in Need by clicking here

To learn more about our self harm support services, please contact Harmless by emailing info@harmless.org.uk