From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Professor Louis Appleby

Louis Appleby graduated in medicine in Edinburgh and subsequently trained in hospital medicine and psychiatry, the latter at the Institute of Psychiatry, London. He has an MD from Edinburgh and is a Fellow of the Royal Colleges of both Physicians and Psychiatrists. He has held research grants totalling £15.5m from the Wellcome Trust, MRC, Department of Health and other NHS sources.

Louis leads the Centre for Mental Health and Safety, investigating suicide and self-harm, violence and forensic services, the largest research unit in this field internationally.  Its findings have been the basis of Government policy on suicide prevention and are widely quoted by governments, professionals and charities.  From 2000-2010 Louis was seconded (part-time) as the Government’s National Director for Mental Health to lead a national programme of reform in mental health care in England and from 2010-2014 he was National Clinical Director for Health and Criminal Justice. 

BOOK NOW

From Harm to Hope Conference

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.
As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide

Children’s grief awareness week

This week has been Children’s grief awareness week, which runs from 16th to 22nd November

It is estimated that 1 in 29 children and young people in school have been bereaved by a parent of sibling. The Childhood Bereavement Network estimates that over 100 children are bereaved of a mum or dad each day.

We understand that bereavement by suicide is unlike any other type of bereavement, and we do not want anyone to feel alone or like there is no one to turn to for help.

The Tomorrow Project offer support to those that may be in suicide crisis and those that have been bereaved and affected by suicide. No matter what age, we can help

The Tomorrow Project will be here, for those bereaved and affected by suicide, when and as you need us.

#yourenotalone

bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 880 0280

 

 

 

Focus on you: a blog from orlaghslittlecorner

I feel like we all must do it. Compare ourselves to others I mean. Looking at their achievements and how far they’ve come, how appealing their life looks and all the things they have got and have done. But you gotta stop that. Seriously.  

Comparison is the thief of joy. 

It truly is! Whilst you’re comparing you life to someone’s else’s you will always feel lame. There may always be someone who seems to have more than you, but don’t forget that actually your life to someone else will look amazing compared to theirs. It’s a constant battle of people comparing themselves to each other. And it’s got to stop. 

Everyone’s path has been/is different in life. Some people have been through a hell of a lot, family issues, personal issues, health issues -you name it! But I’m pretty positive in the fact that every person you could ask would have some story, some bad times in their life, so you can’t let yours be a comparison.

Celebrate people’s joy and how far they have come and be happy for them without comparing yourself!

You will never be able to see how far you have come whilst you are doing that whole ‘compare yourself to others’ thing. Take time to stop and look and realise all the amazing things you have done. How much you have achieved. Compare yourself to yourself. Look at how much you have done, how far you have traveled, how much experience you have gained in a year or 3 years, 5 or 10!

By comparing yourself to yourself you can also set some realistic goals based on where you are in life (and not by where society says you should be!). You know what goals you have to set to make a dream become a plan and whatever time frame that is that fits you, that is the perfect amount.

Throw into the mix some self-care, some you-time, some breaks from life and you will hopefully have a better look on things! ✌🏼

Link to the blog and for more wonderful blogs written by orlaghslittlecorner.wordpress.com

 

 

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Claire Dixon

Claire has been a specialist trainer with Harmless since November 2016. She previously coordinated and delivered healthy relationship work in secondary schools for domestic abuse prevention charity Equation.

Claire volunteered with Samaritans for five years as a listening volunteer, trainer, and coordinator for HMP Nottingham’s Listeners Scheme.

Claire’s passion for training in this sector comes through experience working with young people and schools, as well as personal experience of self harm, suicide and mental health problems. Through training, she hopes to further promote awareness and challenge stigma around self harm, mental health and suicide.

BOOK NOW

In the News: Children and young people with mental health problems waiting up to 18 months before they get help, finds report.

Investigators find youngsters are facing ‘agonising waits’ for treatment.

The Government has been accused of “neglecting” children’s mental health after it emerged some youngsters are waiting more than a year to be treated.

A major review by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) of mental health services for young people has found that vulnerable children are facing “agonising waits” for treatment, with one young person who spoke to investigators waiting for 18 months.

During prolonged waits, children and young people are unable to access the support they need, causing their mental health to deteriorate further, with some starting to self-harm, become suicidal or drop out of school during the wait to receive support, the report found.

The findings also showed that even when children do access treatment, the services were not always adequate to respond to their needs, with more than a third (39 per cent) of specialist child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) across the UK currently requiring improvement.

There is also regional variation in the estimated prevalence of mental health problems in children and young people, with an estimated 8 per cent of children aged 5 to 16 years old in the Thames Valley area suffering from a mental health condition, compared with 11 per cent in London, investigators found.

The report has prompted calls for the Government to ring-fence mental health budgets so that money reaches front line services and to set maximum waiting times.

Responding to the findings, Barbara Keeley MP, Labour’s Shadow Cabinet Minister for Mental Health, said: “This report reveals the Tory Government’s abject failure of children and young people in urgent need of mental health treatment.

“It is a scandal that as a result of the Tories’ neglect of child and adolescent mental health over a third of services need to improve access, with some children having to wait as long as eighteen months to be treated.

“Labour will continue to call on the Tory Government to invest in and ring-fence mental health budgets as Labour pledged at the General Election, so that money reaches the underfunded services on the front line.”

Former Liberal Democrat Care Minister Norman Lamb echoed her concerns, saying: “If the current Government had shown leadership in driving these changes and ensuring that funding was being spent where it was needed, we might have seen more progress.

“The Prime Minister makes all the right noises about improving mental health care, now she needs to translate these words into action. Children deserve better.”

The report comes as child mental health charities and campaigners warned that young people are not receiving adequate mental health provision.

Recent research by the Children’s Society’s found that 30,000 children were being turned away from mental health services every year and not receiving any support or treatment at all.

It also found that children missed 157,000 mental health appointments last year, with many missed appointments never followed up by health professionals to check that the children concerned were safe and well.

Matthew Reed, chief executive of the Children’s Society, said in response to the CQC report: “Despite increased attention and investment, services remain fragmented and are increasingly overstretched, and too many children are suffering as a result.

 

Read the full article here: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/mental-health-children-waiting-times-18-months-care-quality-commission-report-a8021941.html

In the media: How shame can take a toll on your emotional health

The June 2015 cover of Women’s Health magazine featured a slender Gwyneth Paltrow and the words “BIKINI BODY In 2 Weeks! Tight Butt, Lean Legs, These Abs!” with an arrow pointing to Paltrow’s washboard middle. Covers like these have drawn their share of criticism. The idiom “bikini body” suggests there is only one kind of person who can fit into a bikini. It’s an example of body shaming.

That term can be imprecise. What exactly is shame anyway? And can we cope with it?

Author and academic Jennifer Jacquet defines the concept in her book “Is Shame Necessary?”: “Shaming, which is separate from feeling ashamed, is a form of punishment, and like all punishment, it is used to enforce norms.”

Stray from society’s expectations and risk being shamed. Jacquet notes that shame differs from guilt because, in “contrast to shame, which aims to hold individuals to the group standard, guilt’s role is to hold individuals to their own standards.” Sometimes shame can be healthy. Sometimes it can be harmful. Its value is a function of the norm being enforced.

If we demean a friend, it is reasonable for us to feel ashamed—we violated the norm of decency. As psychologist Brené Brown said in a TED talk, “We’re pretty sure that the only people who don’t experience shame are people who have no capacity for connection or empathy.”

Shame becomes harmful if it’s used to enforce an unhealthy norm, and there is no shortage of unhealthy norms. Type, “I feel ashamed of my” into Google, and the search engine will autocomplete with “body,” “job,” “past,” or “sexuality.”

Brown explained that unhealthy norms tend to be gendered—to conform to female norms, she said, women must be “nice, thin, modest, and use all available resources for appearance.” For men, it’s more simple: avoid acting weak. Men are expected to control their emotions, prioritize work, and pursue status. We are prone to feeling ashamed when we stray from these norms.

Shame can be most harmful when it becomes internalized; when it shifts from being about what we’ve done to being about who we are. Psychologists refer to “toxic shame.” as the feeling that we are wholly inadequate and fundamentally unworthy of love. [Editor’s note: when I feel like this, I turn to the Self-Esteem pack. It helps.]

Toxic shame can take a huge toll on our emotional health. “Shame is highly, highly correlated with addiction, depression, violence, aggression, bullying, suicide, eating disorders,” Brown says. The antidote to feeling shame is a willingness to be vulnerable, Brown says. To be human is to be imperfect— to have scars and stretch marks, and to cry when sad or afraid.

Brown suggests we seek the empathy of friends and loved ones. “If you put shame in a Petri dish, it needs three things to grow exponentially: secrecy, silence, and judgment,” she explains. “If you put the same amount in a Petri dish and douse it with empathy, it can’t survive. The two most powerful words when we’re in struggle: me too.” Importantly, people also can work to change harmful norms. In a 2015 online survey, Women’s Health asked readers what words or phrases they might avoid printing on the magazine’s cover. Options included “slim,” “lean,” and “bikini body.” Respondents overwhelmingly objected to “bikini body.”

In a sense, readers chose to enforce a new norm. In their determination, the magazine should encourage health, fitness, and a positive body image. Wrote one reader, “I hate how women’s magazines emphasize being skinny or wearing bikinis as the reason to be healthy.”

In an open letter responding to the survey, editor-in-chief Amy Keller Laird said the term “bikini body” would be banned from the magazine’s cover. “Dear ‘Bikini Body,’” she wrote. “You’re actually a misnomer, not to mention an unintentional insult: You imply that a body must be a certain size in order to wear a two-piece. Any body—every body—is a bikini body.”

Link to full blog: https://www.headspace.com/blog/2017/11/02/shame-emotional-health/

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Dr Alys Cole-King

BOOK NOW


Alys Cole-King is a Consultant Liason Psychiatrist who maintains a clinical and public health role within the NHS. She works nationally with Royal Colleges, voluntary bodies, academics, and experts by experience to raise awareness of suicide and self-harm. She promotes the need for compassion, collaboration, improved governance and promotes a common language to ensure an improved and more integrated response to people at risk of suicide. A contributor to the All Party Parliamentary Group for Suicide and Self-harm Prevention, Alys is also on the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Mental Health Training Advisory Group, and has contributed to their curriculum. Alys leads international campaigns via social media and works with the media to ensure a compassionate and safe approach to suicide prevention.

As Connecting with People Clinical Director, Alys led the development of Connecting with People’s Suicide Assessment Framework E-Tool (SAFETool). This approach is based on more than 20 years clinical experience, a thorough review of published evidence and a full time research project using psychological autopsy technique to investigate factors relating to episodes of self-harm or suicide attempts. Alys is a primary author of a number of papers, book chapters, webinars, podcasts, blogs and self-help resources on suicide and self-harm prevention, Alys has also contributed to the RCGP e-learning module on suicide prevention and delivered a BMJ Masterclass Webinar on suicide mitigation. Alys sits on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Compassionate Health Care, is a reviewer for several journals and sits on the international Expert Reference group advising Griffiths University academics, a WHO Collaborating Centre on responding to professionals who have experienced the suicide of a patient.

 

From Harm to Hope Conference: 

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

BOOK NOW

From Harm to Hope: Introducing the Speakers

Caroline Harroe, CEO, Harmless

BOOK NOW

Caroline is Harmless’ CEO and one of its co-founders, launching the service in 2007 with fellow Director Amy, and ensuring the service has gone from strength to award winning strength.

Caroline has over 15 years’ experience in the field of self harm and mental health. A practicing psychotherapist and a tireless campaigner for equality for those experiencing mental health difficulties. Caroline is currently completing her PhD, is an elected member of the National Suicide Prevention Alliance and is involved in many local and national suicide prevention strategy and research projects.

Leading with experience, Caroline overcame her personal experience of self harm and mental health problems and after a long battle to overcome these difficulties, she now hopes to inspire hope in others by sharing her recovery.

From Harm to Hope Conference: 

We are pleased to announce that Harmless’ third national self harm conference will be held on Thursday 1st March 2018, Self Harm Awareness Day. This year’s theme is ‘self harm: suicide prevention starts here’.

As in previous years, the conference will be shaped around the following five strategic areas:

Collaborative partnership
Service user representation
Effective practice
Driving change
Overcoming stigma and discrimination

Our conference gathers together leading academics and experts in the fields of self harm and suicide.

BOOK NOW

Suicide prevention training in Nottingham 

This CPD-accredited course will help expand your understanding and awareness of suicide prevention by exploring attitudes and beliefs to suicide, identifying and assessing risk, implementing a safe plan, and recognising effective models of intervention.The course uses a variety of interactive tools to build delegates’ confidence and skills in responding to, and signposting, those at risk as well as their families, friends and professionals.

Level 3 (advanced) training is suitable for professionals who have attended previous introductory training whose role involves supporting those in distress.

Suicide is the leading cause of death in young people in the UK, and for British men under 50. In order to better support individuals in crisis, we are running our advanced level Suicide Awareness and Prevention training. We know that most people who disclose distress will be speaking to non-professionals such as friends and family who may have no formal training. In addition, any professional who works with people can benefit from learning more about assessing risk, safety planning, and responding to individuals in crisis using brief interventions.

Link to this session: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/suicide-prevention-level-3-advanced-training-tickets-37915182331

£110 per place

 

Suicide Prevention Service, The Tomorrow Project, hosts an event on 8th September exploring The Tomorrow Projects pathways, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day on September the 10th, 2017.

The Tomorrow Project will be hosting an event exploring the suicide prevention pathways, two days before World Suicide Prevention Day, 2017. Delegates will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories. The Tomorrow Project was established in South Nottinghamshire in 2012 after there were a number of deaths to suicide in a local community. By galvanising local support, bereaved families and professionals, The Tomorrow project was established to deliver services and support to reach people in distress and reduce suicide.

The Tomorrow project will also be hosting an introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide. This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: Identifying risk factors, understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools, establishing current emotional states & behaviours and reviewing & revisiting risk.

Whilst there has been significant attention paid locally and nationally to suicide prevention, it remains a very specialist and under funded piece of work.

The bereaved by suicide also remain an overlooked group. These individuals are at an 80% increased chance of unemployment and a 1 in 10 chance of attempting suicide.

When compared with people bereaved through other causes, those bereaved by suicide are at an increased risk of suicide, psychiatric admission and depression, as well as suicide attempt and poor social functioning.

Penny Johnson, a bereaved mother, lost her son to suicide and says: “The Tomorrow Project is so vital in so many ways. Before my son died, we tried to get him help via the NHS only to be turned away because Jamie was over 18. I pleaded with them to help us, but they said that they couldn’t unless Jamie was the one asking for help but in October, 2012, Jamie took his own life. My family have been in turmoil ever since, each of us needing help in our own way and The Tomorrow Project has been there for us. I don’t know how we would have survived without them.”

The Tomorrow Project’s event is to be held at The Sir Collin Campbell building, September 8th 2017, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day. The team are incredibly excited to be hosting the event and look forward to meeting all attendees tomorrow.

A further ticketed event will be held on the evening of the 7th October at Ruddington Grange in Nottingham to celebrate the work and to raise money for the continuation of life saving work, with a drinks reception, dinner, live music and auction.

Tickets available now via: http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/Harmless-Celebration-2017