Therapeutic Support Services

Harmless provide free therapeutic support to both adults and young people. Our age range covers from 11 years up to 70 years. We provide both long term and short term therapy:

  • Short term therapy may last up to 12 sessions with reviews.
  • Long term therapy can last up to 2 years with reviews.

We provide short term community outreach therapeutic clinics in for both adults and children for up to 12 sessions.

We offer monthly drop in support sessions creating a relaxed atmosphere, offering information and advice.

  • Young Person (11-21Yrs) Wednesday 31st May 2017 4 – 5 pm
  • Adult (18+ Yrs) Wednesday 7th June 2017 4 – 5 pm.

Drop in sessions are held at Nottingham Community and Voluntary Centre on Mansfield Road (opposite House of Fraser).

We provide monthly a Crisis Café, where people can come along for some informal support.

  • Our next Crisis Café is Wednesday 14th June 3.30 – 4.30 pm

We offer skype provision, so that people from out of the area wishing to receive remote support can have skype sessions.

If you would like any more information, please email us at info@harmless.org.uk.

Would you like to join the Harmless & Let’s Talk Training team?

We are currently recruiting for the following position to join our Let’s Talk Training team on a sessional basis:

MHFA Trainer (Bank Staff)

The deadline for applications is 30th June 2017, with interviews to take place  w/c 24th July 2017

For an application form and job description, or for more information please email admin@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only). Please include the job title you are applying for in your email.

 

JOB TITLE: MHFA Trainer

Hours: Bank Staff

Remuneration:

  • £150 per day (£300 per 2-day delivery)
  • 25p per mile travel
  • Hotel accommodation for night of Day one (Booked By Harmless)

 

IMPORTANT: FULL DRIVERS LICENSE AND OWN CAR ESSENTIAL FOR THE ROLE 

This role will be ideal for those who have recently qualified to become MHFA instructors.

DUTIES AND KEY RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Deliver MHFA training on behalf of Harmless and its associated projects to external parties including (but not limited to) external organisations, school, professionals and carers.
  • A willingness to offer personal experience during training delivery by sharing own experiences of distress (and/or self harm) and recovery (in line with Harmless’ service user led ethos)
  • A willingness to travel (nationwide) with occasional overnight stay as required.
  • Represent Harmless in a professional manner at all times
  • Deliver training against agreed learning outcomes
  • Develop and maintain training content in line with changes in the field and to the highest standard upon negotiation with the Harmless Management Team
  • Maintain excellent professional relationships with delegates and/or organisations with a view to secure future training opportunities
  • Be an integral part of the booking process with support from the administration team
  • To ensure all data collection tools are used to monitor and improve upon training delivery
  • Ensure training materials are appropriate for delegates requirements
  • Report to Harmless management regularly about the progress of training and address any issues that may arise, recording relevant statistics where required.
  • Promote the work of Harmless in a positive manner and recommend resources and alternative training opportunities where possible.
  • Maintain excellent relationships with delegates and/or organisations before, during and after training delivery
  • To work with Harmless management in continuously improving Harmless’ training packages including (but not limited to) current content, delivery methods, course materials and handouts, booking process.
  • To work with Harmless management in designing and delivering new training packages in order to meet current demands in training, compete with other organisations and increase revenue.
  • To be aware of safeguarding issues that may arise and follow Harmless protocol in managing this.

For an application form and job description, or for more information please email admin@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only). Please include the job title you are applying for in your email.

Suicide Crisis – What does it mean to you?

The word “crisis” in itself is quite an emotive word. For me anyway, when I think of “crisis”, my first image used to be things like panic, immediacy, and fear. It’s defined as “a time of intense difficulty or danger” – this sums it up fairly well, but in this definition there’s no mention of panic or fear – it’s an assumption. While these emotions are commonly present in a person experiencing a crisis, this is not always how that person can present to someone who’s talking to them.

Then, the word “suicide” is also not only an emotive word, but a stigmatised one. We are frequently reluctant to say this word and there’s also a fear of using it, of acknowledging it. I feel this can often be the case for anyone involved; the person themselves, friends and family talking to them about it, as well as professionals involved in their care.

When we then take the phrase “suicide crisis”, this can be a phrase which strikes fear into those involved. But if we’re afraid of the phrase, how can we discuss it openly with someone who is feeling this way? I think it’s really important to be mindful of how a person is experiencing a suicide crisis and how they construe their crisis. While there may be some overlap between people and how they present, there’s fairly often some variance, distinctions, and even contradictions in protective, predisposing etc. factors (e.g., one person’s protective factor could be another person’s precipitating factor).

For me, this interpretation of a suicide crisis makes it all the more important that I ask every person I see not only how they feel, but how they interpret their suicide crisis, what is contributing to it or preventing them from acting on their thoughts, and what made them now want to opt into our crisis pathway.

Within this, I think it’s important to address the person’s experience suicide crisis directly – I’ve discovered that something that may seem as simple as asking a question is such a powerful tool, and even though those questions can at times be difficult to ask and respond to, in the end they usually allow both me and the person I’m working with to work from the same page. Clarity is so important because if we work based on assumptions and implications then there is a lot more room for us to misjudge what the person seeking support is experiencing.

This is but one of the reasons why we shouldn’t shy away from phrases like “suicide crisis”. It’s ok to ask about suicide, and it’s ok to talk about it. At Harmless and The Tomorrow Project, we may be the professionals working with the people, but the people are the experts when it comes to their own thoughts, feelings and crisis. Our job is to listen and to help facilitate change if that person feels ready, not to force people into recovery.

If you feel like you need support around issues relating to self-harm or suicide including being bereaved by suicide, please feel free to contact either Harmless (0115 934 8445) or The Tomorrow Project (0115 934 8447, crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk, bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk) and we will try our best to start supporting you.

Bereavement by suicide

“It felt like a grenade was dropped in the room”.

Someone once told me this was what it felt when the news of a suicide was first heard. The image stuck with me. I imagined little pieces of shrapnel flying towards every possible direction, hitting everything in their path, leaving a mark on everyone in that room.  Some pieces hit immediately, and some would fly slowly, like in a film where the image is played in a slow motion.

The effects of a death by suicide can be much like this grenade. Like stone skipping, they can manifest themselves through a ripple effect, with the circle expanding further and further, new circles appearing, and many lives being affected.

At the Tomorrow Project, we understand that every set of circumstances are different, and we will meet you, emotionally, where you are. Whether you would like emotional support through this incredibly difficult time, or have needs of a more practical nature – we are here.

 Drop us a phone call, email us, or just pop in for a cup of tea (or coffee, for all the coffee lovers out there) and a chat. Or we can meet you at your favourite café. There is no timeframe or age limit to access our service – we are here to support you when you are ready.

Bereavement Support Team
Harmless
NCVS
7 Mansfield Road
Nottingham
NG1 3FB

Mobile: 07594008356
Phone: 0115 934 8445
Email: bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk   

Ana
Suicide Bereavement Project Worker


SURVIVING TO THRIVING – MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS WEEK (8th – 14th May 2017)

This year The Mental Health Foundation, during mental health awareness week, has taken a new positive turn. They have decided instead of asking why so many people are living with mental health problems, they are going to look at why too few of us are thriving with good mental health.

With the theme of Surviving to Thriving, I have decided to take a closer look into exactly what they meant.

Heres what I’ve learnt:

There is a fundamental difference between surviving and thriving. Surviving simply means to just ‘live’ or ‘exist’ whereas thriving means literally to ‘flourish’. It made me wonder how many of us are thriving? And what can we do to ‘thrive’?

Some examples of personal interpretations on thriving:

“Thriving is about Joy – Relationships – Creativity – Passion. It is about doing what you love and thoroughly enjoying it. It is about having a balance between career and personal life and even often about blending career with personal passion.”

“Thriving is about having meaning in everything you do.”

So with this topic of thriving in mind, during Mental Health Awareness week the team at Harmless will be running fundraising and awareness workshops/events. The aim for the week is to raise awareness, break stigmas and bring together the community, whilst raising funds for Harmless’s life saving service.

THRIVING STARTS WITH SELF CARE……….

“Self care includes any intentional actions you take to care for your physical, mental and emotional health”.

At Harmless we encourage self care every day, not only to our clients but to our delegates and our team. We understand the importance of self care…and after all, thriving starts with self care!

Benefits of self care:

- Reduces stress levels.

- Increased resilience.

- Increases positive thinking.

- More effective in supporting others.

- Our mental health effects our physical health, self care supports both.

- More energy and motivation.

Because we understand the importance of self care & thriving we decided to create a week long agenda, during mental health awareness week, to support the community around us. You don’t need to be a service user to attend, every individual is welcome. Here at Harmless we understand that mental health doesn’t discriminate, so neither do we.

We’ve carefully constructed these events to support everyone by: raising awareness, challenging stigma, all whilst raising funds to allow Harmless to continue the life saving services.

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) 15th &16th May – Lincoln

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day interactive workshop in suicide first aid. ASIST teaches participants to recognize when someone may have thoughts of suicide and work with them to create a plan that will support their immediate safety. Although ASIST is widely used by healthcare providers, participants don’t need any formal training to attend the workshop—anyone 16 or older can learn and use the ASIST model.

CLICK HERE TO BOOK NOW

For more details on our next course see below

“I have lost someone to suicide, how do I get help?”

At The Tomorrow Project, our Suicide Bereavement Pathway is open to anyone who has experienced traumatic bereavement by suicide. We understand that this type of bereavement is particularly difficult, with a lot of complex feelings and questions.

What we can provide is practical and emotional support, to help guide you through this confusing and difficult time. We can help with issues surrounding finance, debt, employment, housing and many other things, we can also provide information and support throughout the inquest process which is often new to many bereaved people. We’re also here for emotional support too, for when you need to speak to someone about how you’re feeling, and what your needs might be so that we can support you towards finding that help.

Reaching out is not always the easiest thing to do, but we are here, and we want to help. You can refer in to us through a variety of different ways, you can call us on 0115 934 8445, e-mail us at bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk ask your doctor to get in touch with us, ask a friend, message us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or even if there’s someone you know who is struggling and you’d like to find out what support is available then please let us know.

Bereavement by suicide is uniquely devastating and we know how much impact this can have on family, friends, colleagues and the community. This isn’t something that anyone should have to face alone, and that’s why we’re here so please, let us be there for you.

 

Ashley Dunstan

Suicide bereavement Project Worker

 

Harmless bake sale for Comic Relief!

Today we are raising money for Comic Relief 2017.

If you fancy a sweet or savoury snack pop into

Nottingham Voluntary Action Centre, 7 Mansfield Road, NG1 3FB.

We are here till 4pm!!!

Harmless do the Mannequin Challenge

Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 

 

Sophie Allen speaks to the BBC in light of the recent NPSCC article about the worrying rise in self harm admissions to hospital

You may have seen or heard on the news last Friday, an article from NSPCC about how the rate of hospital admissions for self harm is frighteningly high, with an estimated 19,000 children being admitted to hospital for self harm, which saw an increase of 14% over a 3 year period.

The NSPCC’s figures, collected from all but six NHS Trusts in England and health boards in Wales, reveal that 18,788 under-18s were admitted to hospital or treated at accident and emergency units for self-harm in 2015-16.

This compares with 16,416 admissions for self-harm in 2013-14

As a result of this article coming out, Harmless were contacted by various media sources, wanting to gather more information, or speak to individuals with lived experience or self harm, in order to provide some valuable insight into the causes of self harm, why people adopt this behaviour and also, most importantly, what can be done to support individuals in distress.

My first interview was with BBC Radio 5 live Breakfast Show, very early on Friday morning, speaking to Nicky Campbell and then I appeared on the drive time show later on in the day too, with Verity Cowley. Within this, I talked about my lived experience of self harm, but also my journey of recovery. It is important to provide hope to others. I shared many things, such as what led me to self harm, how it made me feel, but also, more generally the challenges that we, as a service, come across day in day out. I discussed the importance of having these conversations in order to breakdown the taboo around self harm. I also stated the importance of trying to understand self harm and what needs to happen to drive change.

If you want to listen to my piece on the Breakfast show or the drive time show, they can be heard on the links provided, http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b084crrn and http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04gj501