“I have lost someone to suicide, how do I get help?”

At The Tomorrow Project, our Suicide Bereavement Pathway is open to anyone who has experienced traumatic bereavement by suicide. We understand that this type of bereavement is particularly difficult, with a lot of complex feelings and questions.

What we can provide is practical and emotional support, to help guide you through this confusing and difficult time. We can help with issues surrounding finance, debt, employment, housing and many other things, we can also provide information and support throughout the inquest process which is often new to many bereaved people. We’re also here for emotional support too, for when you need to speak to someone about how you’re feeling, and what your needs might be so that we can support you towards finding that help.

Reaching out is not always the easiest thing to do, but we are here, and we want to help. You can refer in to us through a variety of different ways, you can call us on 0115 934 8445, e-mail us at bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk ask your doctor to get in touch with us, ask a friend, message us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or even if there’s someone you know who is struggling and you’d like to find out what support is available then please let us know.

Bereavement by suicide is uniquely devastating and we know how much impact this can have on family, friends, colleagues and the community. This isn’t something that anyone should have to face alone, and that’s why we’re here so please, let us be there for you.

 

Ashley Dunstan

Suicide bereavement Project Worker

 

TP Crisis Pathway

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential,
community based suicide prevention service

The Tomorrow Project launched two new pathways on the 12th September; suicide crisis and suicide bereavement. Working at The Tomorrow Project on the suicide crisis pathway has opened up eyes and hearts to those in need.

There were 6,122 suicides of people aged 10 and over registered in the UK in 2014 as published by the office for national statistics. This is 6,122 more than there should have been.

We have seen the referrals and interest in this pathway grow and grow, this emphasises the importance of the project. After seeing the difference, one chat and one cup of tea can make. When a client comes in full of distress and sadness, to leaving filled with hope for the next day, and the days after that. Not only have you possibly filled someone’s day with a little bit of joy, you’ve maybe saved a life.

The work we do here at the Tomorrow Project Crisis Pathway is vital. We help clients keep engaged in their lives, we work towards making their situations better, both practically and emotionally, but most of all, we offer compassion. We offer support. We offer validation. We fight the stigmas that surround suicide. We remind people they aren’t the bad that happened to them. They are important. They are valid. They are loved.

If you need any support, please contact crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk or call 0115 9348447, leaving a message including your name, contact details and a crisis worker will contact you within 1 working day.

 

Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

We are currently recruiting for a number of positions within the organisation to join our specialist self harm and suicide prevention team.

To download an application form and job description for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant links below. For more information please email info@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only). Please include which job you are applying for in your email.

Positions:

  • Therapist
  • Suicide Bereavement Project Worker
  • Suicide Crisis Project Worker

Applications close at 5pm on Monday 2nd January 2017.

First interviews to be held w/c 9th January 2017.

Second interviews to be held w/c 16th January 2017.

More information on all positions can be found at the following links:

To download our application form, please click here.

To download the job descriptions for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant link below:

Our Trainer, Sarah, Reflects on Attending Recent Conferences around Suicide

Since working for Harmless I have attended two conferences, my first was the Suicide Prevention and Intervention Network (SPIN) in Aylesbury. My second, further North, was the Suicide Bereavement conference in Manchester. These are my first experiences of connecting with the wider community and so I thought I would take a minute to share my reflections of them.

As you enter these vast noise-filled spaces, weighed down by the heavy banners and numerous leaflets you have packed tightly into a carry case, your senses are overloaded by the hubbub of people who move continuously betwixt one another, similar to that of a river’s current. The main force of the current comes from the entrance of the room where you find yourself advancing with a stream of people until you come to the calmer central space.  Here you look around and quickly find yourself a place to dock. Whilst setting up your stand and raising the banner, your heightened senses pick up on the strong smell of coffee and tea and you feel drenched by the chatter of various accents. No sooner have you placed your last set of leaflets on the table then you are swamped by a multitude of curious faces and smiles. I have always enjoyed meeting new people and networking is a wonderful opportunity to do just that. You delve straight into conversation with the first inquisitive person who happens to catch your eye…and you’re off. I have never been one to brag and I was worried networking would involve a lot of bragging about how amazing our company is. However, I learnt this is not entirely the case and that in fact a lot of the time I found myself telling a story, telling my organisation’s story, my own story and the story of those who were not there to tell theirs.

Pretty quickly time catches up to you and your story telling is interrupted. You leave the safety of your dock in exchange for a foldable seat, before which is a podium and bright lights. Whilst you catch your breath and take in the sights around you, it is not long before you are absorbed by numerous speakers, all of whom speak with enthusiasm and passion for their cause. You can’t help but feel that same sense of passion as you hear their words wash over you.

For me the greatest achievement is when you see your organisation change a life. To help even just one person is enough to remind you of what you are fighting for. It puts your ideology into reality.  One life seems so small but look into the eyes of that individual and your cup is overflowing. It is more than enough to know that saving lives really is the priority. Underneath all the protocol and financial strains I dare anyone to stare into the eyes of someone in need and see them as a statistic or a figure.

I have learnt a lot from my first couple of conference visits and look forward to attending more over the coming years. I hope to fortify the friendships I have made and continue to develop my own learning whilst always striving to save lives, even if it is only one life at a time.

Our CEO, Caroline, an adviser for a new Suicide Prevention Document published today by Public Health England.

The document  is entitled ‘Identifying and responding to suicide clusters and contagion: a practice resource’, and is for people with responsibility for suicide prevention in local authorities and their partner agencies.

The document includes:

  • the meaning of the term ‘suicide clusters’
  • identification of suicide clusters
  • suggestions for who may be at risk of suicidal acts due to the influence of other people’s suicidal behaviour,
  • the mechanisms involved in suicide clusters
  • the effects of suicide on other individuals

The steps required at local level to prepare for a suicide cluster are described alongside suggested responses to possible suicide clusters.

Finally, best practice is provided on how to evaluate responses to a cluster, and on using the experience to improve further suicide prevention measures.

For more information and to view the document, please click the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/suicide-prevention-identifying-and-responding-to-suicide-clusters

Harmless Trainer Talks, Self Harm, Suicide Prevention and Mental Health Training

I have now completed my first deliveries of ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) and MHFA (Mental Health First Aid) and wanted to share how these went.

So ASIST was delivered at the end of July and was an enjoyable and positive experience. I feel it was well received by the delegates and that they really engaged with the process over the 2 days.

There were of course challenges given the topic, but as a group we worked together to overcome these challenges and everyone was supported and supportive throughout what is an extremely emotive experience. There were laughs and tears, which is perfectly normal in ASIST. It is an opportunity to share personal experiences in a safe and confidential environment.

As a Trainer, it is extremely important to value and respect everyone’s contributions and allow time for reflection. It is also important to create a safe learning environment where delegates feed confident and at ease to fully participate. I feel overall, myself and my co –facilitator managed this, ensuring each individual got the best experience they could while being both challenged and supported.  I am looking forward to my next delivery on 7th and 8th September.

MHFA was delivered two weeks ago and will be delivered on 26th and 27th August, which I am looking forward to. Again, I found this delivery really enjoyable. There are a range of activities which ensure participant engagement and most importantly allow delegates the opportunity to interact with peers and discuss mental health in depth through group and paired discussions. MHFA really is a good opportunity to learn the skills the support individuals in crisis and share knowledge and experience in a safe and secure learning environment.

I feel the delegates fully engaged in what is quite an interactive session and found it re-affirming and thought provoking throughout.

For both ASIST and MHFA there was a wealth of skills, knowledge and experience in the room. This can make for challenging deliveries in terms of delegates being afraid to say or do the wrong thing in front of other professionals. However, I felt a huge amount of respect for each and every individual as they all had the courage to contribute and share resulting in an extremely positive delivery for both ASIST and MHFA

If you would like any more information regarding ASIST and MHFA training, or would like to book a place, please contact us at training@harmless.org.uk, alternatively you can call the office on 0115 934 8445.

ASIST Training at Harmless – 7th & 8th September

ASIST – Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training

Monday 7th and Tuesday 8th September 2015  - £250* per person

To coincide with World Suicide Awareness Day (10th September) Harmless will be delivering a 2 day ASIST Workshop in Nottingham.

The upcoming training, co-delivered by two qualified and certified ASIST trainers, is designed to increase your skills, abilities and confidence in your job role to support those at risk of suicide and be better prepared to deal with those at risk.

Places are limited, so please book early to avoid disappointment.

Refreshments, lunch and all resources will be provided on both days of the workshop.

Certificate for  each delegate upon completion

Who is ASIST for?

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is for everyone 16 or older—regardless of prior experience—who wants to be able to provide suicide first aid. Shown by major studies to significantly reduce suicidality, the ASIST model teaches effective intervention skills while helping to build suicide prevention networks in the community.

We mean it when we say that ASIST is for everyone. Virtually anyone aged 16 and older can learn the skills to intervene and save a life from suicide. Professionals as well as members of the community at large have all found great value in ASIST over the years.

Many professionals attend ASIST because suicide intervention skills are essential for their work. In many organisations, ASIST is a mandatory component of training. Nurses, physicians, mental health professionals, pharmacists, teachers, counsellors, youth workers, police, first responders, correctional staff, school support staff, clergy, and volunteers have all found that ASIST complements their existing training and knowledge.

Other people attend simply because they want to be able to help someone in need, in much the same way they might learn CPR. Because the training is comprehensive and doesn’t rely on prior qualifications, they can have the same meaningful experience as a professional caregiver.

Why is ASIST important?

Developed in 1983 and regularly updated to reflect improvements in knowledge and practice, ASIST is the world’s leading suicide intervention workshop. During the two-day interactive session, participants learn to intervene and help prevent the immediate risk of suicide. Over 1,000,000 people have taken the workshop, and studies have proven that the ASIST method helps reduce suicidal feelings for those at risk.

Workshop features:

  • Presentations and guidance from two LivingWorks registered trainers
  • A scientifically proven intervention model
  • Powerful audiovisual learning aids
  • Group discussions
  • Skills practice and development
  • A balance of challenge and safety

ASIST has saved and changed hundreds of thousands of lives around the world.

What are the main benefits of attending ASIST training?

Here is what you can expect at your ASIST training:

  • ASIST is held over two consecutive days for a total of 15 hours.
  • ASIST is based on principles of adult learning. It values participants’ experiences and contributions and encourages them to share actively in the learning process.
  • ASIST workshops always have a minimum of two active ASIST trainers present for the entire two days. If there are more than 30 participants, there will be at least three trainers. Workshops over 45 participants are not recommended and should be split into two separate sessions instead.
  • Trainers show two award-winning videos in the course of the workshop. Cause of Death? provides a common starting point for the discussion of attitudes about suicide, while two versions of It Begins with You illustrate the process of a suicide intervention.
  • Some parts of ASIST take place with all participants together, and others take place in a smaller work group. This helps create a balance between safety and challenge. Participants need not disclose personal experiences to the whole group.
  • Local resources are provided and their availability in the community is discussed.
  • Participant materials include a 20-page workbook, wallet card, and stickers. Participants also receive a certificate upon completing the workshop.

What does ASIST cover?

There are 5 key stages of ASIST;

Preparing – Sets the tone, norms and expectations of the learning experience.

Connecting – Sensitizes participants to their own attitudes towards suicide. Creates an understanding of the impact that attitudes can have on the intervention process.

Understanding – Overviews the intervention needs of a person at risk. It focuses on providing participants with the knowledge and skills to recognize risk and develop safe plans to reduce the risk of suicide.

Assisting - Presents a model for effective suicide intervention. Participants develop their skills through observation and supervised simulation experiences in large and small groups.

Networking - Generates information about resources in the local community. Promotes a commitment by participants to transform local resources into helping networks.

Where can I find more information or book on the course?

For more information about our ASIST training or to book please contact Harmless and ask for Sophie Allen (Training coordinator and ASIST trainer).

To book on this course, click here

Emailtraining@harmless.org.uk or Telephone: 0115 9348445

Date(s): 7th and 8th September 2015 Times: 9am until 5pm (both days)

Training Location: Harmless, NCVS, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham NG1 3FB

Please note: Attendance on both days of the workshop is mandatory

Congratulations Hollie!

The team at Harmless and the Tomorrow Project would like to thank Hollie Smith for helping to raise £500 towards our Suicide Prevention services in East Leake.

The Tomorrow Project needs great fundraising efforts like this one to continue delivering vital support and suicide prevention services as it currently receives no statutory funding.

Hollie’s contribution will go towards the delivery of this work and help us work towards a brighter future for many people.

Congratulations to Hollie for completing the Litchfield Half Marathon on Sunday 3rd May, and thank you to everyone that supported Hollie in her challenge. All of the money raised really does make a difference.

Angela Samata – Life After Suicide BBC1 Tuesday March 17th 2015 22.45

As a TASC Core Member and supporter, Harmless would like to inform you all about a programme that is being screened on BBC 1 on Tuesday March 17th at 22.45. A link to the Radio Times is here. The programme is being presented by Angela Samata, who was chair of the Survivors of Bereavement by Suicide and a member of The Alliance of Suicide Prevention Charities (TASC).

Angela’s partner Mark took his own life 11 years ago and she meets others who have experienced a similar loss, asking why some people choose to take their own lives and whether those left behind can come to terms with their bereavement. She meets Downton Abbey actor David Robb, a Suffolk farmer and Norfolk woman who lives with the suicides of both her husband and son.

 

In the news….Why are men more likely to take their own lives?

This week saw the deputy prime minister, Nick Clegg, appeal for the widespread adoption of a “zero suicide” campaign in the NHS. This is admirable, but a concerted effort to prevent people from taking their own lives would be more effective if we understood why suicide is a particularly male problem. It’s known as the “gender paradox of suicidal behaviour”.

Research suggests that women are especially prone to psychological problems such as depression, which almost always precede suicide. In western societies, overall rates of mental health disorders tend to be around 20-40% higher for women than for men.

Given the unequal burden of distress implied by these figures, it is hardly surprising that women are more likely to experience suicidal thoughts. The Adult Psychiatric Morbidity in England 2007 survey found that 19% of women had considered taking their own life. For men the figure was 14%. And women aren’t simply more likely to think about suicide – they are also more likely to act on the idea. The survey found that 7% of women and 4% of men had attempted suicide at some point in their lives.

But of the 5,981 deaths by suicide in the UK in 2012, more than three quarters (4,590) were males. In the US, of the 38,000 people who took their own lives in 2010, 79% were men.

(These are startling figures in their own right, but it is also worth remembering just how devastating the effects of a death by suicide can be for loved ones left behind. Studies have shown, for example, an increased risk of subsequent suicide in partners, increased likelihood of admission to psychiatric care for parents, increased risk of suicide in mothers bereaved by an adult child’s suicide, and increased risk of depression in offspring bereaved by the suicide of a parent.)

So if women are more likely to suffer from psychological problems, to experience suicidal thoughts and attempt suicide, how do we explain why men are more likely to die by suicide?

Source http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/jan/21/suicide-gender-men-women-mental-health-nick-clegg#img-1