Light a Candle: World Suicide Prevention Day – 10 September 2017

Light a Candle near a Window at 8 PM to show your support for suicide prevention, to remember a lost loved one, and for the survivors of suicide.

Every year, more than 800,000 people die by suicide and up to 25 times as many make a suicide attempt. Behind these statistics are the individual stories of those who have, for many different reasons, questioned the value of their own lives.

Each one of these individuals is part of a community. Some may be well linked in to this community, and have a network of family, friends and work colleagues or school mates. Others may be less well connected, and some may be quite isolated. Regardless of the circumstances, communities have an important role to play in supporting those who are vulnerable.

This sentiment is reflected in the theme of the 2017 World Suicide Prevention Day: ‘Take a minute, change a life.’ As members of communities, it is our responsibility to look out for those who may be struggling, check in with them, and encourage them to tell their story in their own way and at their own pace. Offering a gentle word of support and listening in a non-judgmental way can make all the difference.

Life is precious and sometimes precarious. Taking a minute to reach out to someone – a complete stranger r close family member or friend – can change the course of their life.

2017 marks the 15th World Suicide Prevention Day. The day was first recognised in 2003, as an initiative of the International Association for Suicide Prevention and endorsed by the World Health Organization. World Suicide Prevention Day takes place each year on September 10.

On September 10, join with others around the world who are working towards the common goal of preventing suicide. Show your support by taking part in our Cycle Around the Globe campaign aimed at raising awareness through community action. Find out what local activities have been scheduled as well – or initiate one yourself!

Finally, if there is anyone you are concerned about, take a minute to check in with them. It could change their life.

Suicide Prevention Service, The Tomorrow Project, hosts an event on 8th September exploring The Tomorrow Projects pathways, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day on September the 10th, 2017.

The Tomorrow Project will be hosting an event exploring the suicide prevention pathways, two days before World Suicide Prevention Day, 2017. Delegates will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories. The Tomorrow Project was established in South Nottinghamshire in 2012 after there were a number of deaths to suicide in a local community. By galvanising local support, bereaved families and professionals, The Tomorrow project was established to deliver services and support to reach people in distress and reduce suicide.

The Tomorrow project will also be hosting an introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide. This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: Identifying risk factors, understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools, establishing current emotional states & behaviours and reviewing & revisiting risk.

Whilst there has been significant attention paid locally and nationally to suicide prevention, it remains a very specialist and under funded piece of work.

The bereaved by suicide also remain an overlooked group. These individuals are at an 80% increased chance of unemployment and a 1 in 10 chance of attempting suicide.

When compared with people bereaved through other causes, those bereaved by suicide are at an increased risk of suicide, psychiatric admission and depression, as well as suicide attempt and poor social functioning.

Penny Johnson, a bereaved mother, lost her son to suicide and says: “The Tomorrow Project is so vital in so many ways. Before my son died, we tried to get him help via the NHS only to be turned away because Jamie was over 18. I pleaded with them to help us, but they said that they couldn’t unless Jamie was the one asking for help but in October, 2012, Jamie took his own life. My family have been in turmoil ever since, each of us needing help in our own way and The Tomorrow Project has been there for us. I don’t know how we would have survived without them.”

The Tomorrow Project’s event is to be held at The Sir Collin Campbell building, September 8th 2017, in line with World Suicide Prevention Day. The team are incredibly excited to be hosting the event and look forward to meeting all attendees tomorrow.

A further ticketed event will be held on the evening of the 7th October at Ruddington Grange in Nottingham to celebrate the work and to raise money for the continuation of life saving work, with a drinks reception, dinner, live music and auction.

Tickets available now via: http://www.harmless.org.uk/store/Harmless-Celebration-2017

Have you emailed The Tomorrow Project and not received a reply? We’re sorry – We have been having technical issues!

It has come to our attention that emails sent to tomorrow@harmless.org.uk have not been reaching us. Unfortunately, this was due to a  technical issue with the email address that have now been rectified.

We would like to apologise to anyone who has tried to make contact but have not received a reply!

If you have emailed us and not received a response, please email again.

All our other accounts are working fine and have not experience any issues. 

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential, suicide support service offering support to those in suicide crisis and those bereaved and affected by suicide.

If you require crisis or bereavement support, please use the details blow:

 

For crisis support –

crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8447 – please note this number is not a 24hr help line and a project worker will respond within 1 working day

 

For bereavement support -

bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk

0115 934 8445

#WSPD Prevention Pathways: FREE Suicide prevention workshops

Join us Friday 8th September for ‘The Story so far…’

CLICK HERE TO BOOK A PLACE 

At this event there will be free training workshops and you will have the opportunity to hear about the life saving work we have been doing  as well as hearing directly from people who have benefited from this innovative service, who will be telling their stories.

Venue
Sir Colin Campbell Building
Wollaton Road
Nottingham
NG8 1BB

Programme

08:30 Registration 
9:00 Welcome 
9:30 The story so far…
10:15 Break 
10:30 Workshop 1
12:00 Lunch 
13:00 Workshop 2
14:30 Break
14:45 Living experience 
15:30 Panel
15:45 Finish 

Lunch & Refreshments provided 

Workshop 1: An Introduction to Suicide crisis intervention
This workshop will establish basic principles around Suicide crisis intervention considering the following areas:
  • Myths & facts about suicide 
  • The impact our attitudes have on a suicide crisis intervention 
  • How to support someone effectively who is in crisis 
  • How to signpost effectively 
Workshop 2: An Introduction to effective risk assessment around suicide

This workshop will establish basic principles on effective risk assessment considering the following areas: 
  • Identifying risk factors 
  • Understanding & developing evidence based risk assessment tools
  • Establishing current emotional states & behaviours
  • Reviewing & revisiting risk 

Harmless and the Tomorrow Project supporting Health Care Professionals.

Representative from Harmless and the Tomorrow Project attended the National HealthWatch 2017 Conference at the East Midlands Conference Centre last week.

We were given the opportunity to talk to health and social care professional from across the country, raising awareness of the wonderful work that we do.

On our stand we provided information about the Crisis Support  and the Bereavement Care provided by the Tomorrow Project,  the specialist training provided by Let’s Talk Training   and  the therapeutic support provided to individuals who self harm, their friends, families and professionals.

CYCLING TO SAVE LIVES! WE CHALLENGE…YOU!

The circumference of the world is 40,075 kilometres or 24,900 miles. The International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP) started Cycle Around The Globe four years ago to see if as a community we can come together. Now four years on from the first success, the next challenge is to cycle 4X around the globe, 163km or 99.60k Mi.

 The challenge is to see if we can all contribute to collectively cycle this distance for World Suicide Prevention Day. Please join us and help us reach this target. It does not matter how far you can cycle, every kilometre or mile will be added to the total and there are no limits, you can cycle at home, in the gym or outside, you can even walk.

 The activity is about global community and spreading awareness of the importance of suicide prevention. In the UK alone there were 6,188 suicides, and this just shows the real need for us as a community to come together.

If you would like to take part click here for the sponsorship form and sign up. Let us know by emailing info@harmless.org.uk or phoning 0115 934 8445.

All the money raised goes directly to Harmless & The Tomorrow Project and provides therapeutic services.

*Official participant printed labels for your t-shirts are available to print off*

Join us and Cycle of WSPD and show the world we are all connected in the aim of preventing suicide.

https://iasp.info/wspd2017/cycle-around-globe/

“I have lost someone to suicide, how do I get help?”

At The Tomorrow Project, our Suicide Bereavement Pathway is open to anyone who has experienced traumatic bereavement by suicide. We understand that this type of bereavement is particularly difficult, with a lot of complex feelings and questions.

What we can provide is practical and emotional support, to help guide you through this confusing and difficult time. We can help with issues surrounding finance, debt, employment, housing and many other things, we can also provide information and support throughout the inquest process which is often new to many bereaved people. We’re also here for emotional support too, for when you need to speak to someone about how you’re feeling, and what your needs might be so that we can support you towards finding that help.

Reaching out is not always the easiest thing to do, but we are here, and we want to help. You can refer in to us through a variety of different ways, you can call us on 0115 934 8445, e-mail us at bereavement@tomorrowproject.org.uk ask your doctor to get in touch with us, ask a friend, message us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or even if there’s someone you know who is struggling and you’d like to find out what support is available then please let us know.

Bereavement by suicide is uniquely devastating and we know how much impact this can have on family, friends, colleagues and the community. This isn’t something that anyone should have to face alone, and that’s why we’re here so please, let us be there for you.

 

Ashley Dunstan

Suicide bereavement Project Worker

 

TP Crisis Pathway

The Tomorrow Project is a confidential,
community based suicide prevention service

The Tomorrow Project launched two new pathways on the 12th September; suicide crisis and suicide bereavement. Working at The Tomorrow Project on the suicide crisis pathway has opened up eyes and hearts to those in need.

There were 6,122 suicides of people aged 10 and over registered in the UK in 2014 as published by the office for national statistics. This is 6,122 more than there should have been.

We have seen the referrals and interest in this pathway grow and grow, this emphasises the importance of the project. After seeing the difference, one chat and one cup of tea can make. When a client comes in full of distress and sadness, to leaving filled with hope for the next day, and the days after that. Not only have you possibly filled someone’s day with a little bit of joy, you’ve maybe saved a life.

The work we do here at the Tomorrow Project Crisis Pathway is vital. We help clients keep engaged in their lives, we work towards making their situations better, both practically and emotionally, but most of all, we offer compassion. We offer support. We offer validation. We fight the stigmas that surround suicide. We remind people they aren’t the bad that happened to them. They are important. They are valid. They are loved.

If you need any support, please contact crisis@tomorrowproject.org.uk or call 0115 9348447, leaving a message including your name, contact details and a crisis worker will contact you within 1 working day.

 

Would you like to work for Harmless and The Tomorrow Project?

We are currently recruiting for a number of positions within the organisation to join our specialist self harm and suicide prevention team.

To download an application form and job description for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant links below. For more information please email info@harmless.org.uk or call 0115 934 8445 (admin line only). Please include which job you are applying for in your email.

Positions:

  • Therapist
  • Suicide Bereavement Project Worker
  • Suicide Crisis Project Worker

Applications close at 5pm on Monday 2nd January 2017.

First interviews to be held w/c 9th January 2017.

Second interviews to be held w/c 16th January 2017.

More information on all positions can be found at the following links:

To download our application form, please click here.

To download the job descriptions for each of the roles listed, please click the relevant link below:

Our Trainer, Sarah, Reflects on Attending Recent Conferences around Suicide

Since working for Harmless I have attended two conferences, my first was the Suicide Prevention and Intervention Network (SPIN) in Aylesbury. My second, further North, was the Suicide Bereavement conference in Manchester. These are my first experiences of connecting with the wider community and so I thought I would take a minute to share my reflections of them.

As you enter these vast noise-filled spaces, weighed down by the heavy banners and numerous leaflets you have packed tightly into a carry case, your senses are overloaded by the hubbub of people who move continuously betwixt one another, similar to that of a river’s current. The main force of the current comes from the entrance of the room where you find yourself advancing with a stream of people until you come to the calmer central space.  Here you look around and quickly find yourself a place to dock. Whilst setting up your stand and raising the banner, your heightened senses pick up on the strong smell of coffee and tea and you feel drenched by the chatter of various accents. No sooner have you placed your last set of leaflets on the table then you are swamped by a multitude of curious faces and smiles. I have always enjoyed meeting new people and networking is a wonderful opportunity to do just that. You delve straight into conversation with the first inquisitive person who happens to catch your eye…and you’re off. I have never been one to brag and I was worried networking would involve a lot of bragging about how amazing our company is. However, I learnt this is not entirely the case and that in fact a lot of the time I found myself telling a story, telling my organisation’s story, my own story and the story of those who were not there to tell theirs.

Pretty quickly time catches up to you and your story telling is interrupted. You leave the safety of your dock in exchange for a foldable seat, before which is a podium and bright lights. Whilst you catch your breath and take in the sights around you, it is not long before you are absorbed by numerous speakers, all of whom speak with enthusiasm and passion for their cause. You can’t help but feel that same sense of passion as you hear their words wash over you.

For me the greatest achievement is when you see your organisation change a life. To help even just one person is enough to remind you of what you are fighting for. It puts your ideology into reality.  One life seems so small but look into the eyes of that individual and your cup is overflowing. It is more than enough to know that saving lives really is the priority. Underneath all the protocol and financial strains I dare anyone to stare into the eyes of someone in need and see them as a statistic or a figure.

I have learnt a lot from my first couple of conference visits and look forward to attending more over the coming years. I hope to fortify the friendships I have made and continue to develop my own learning whilst always striving to save lives, even if it is only one life at a time.