Speak up and speak out about stress!

Today is National Stress Awareness Day 
#INSAD2017 and #internationalstressawarenessday

 

 Join us, Monday 13th November for our Self-care in the workplace training workshop 9:30-13:30, Nottingham 

 This CPD-accredited course will improve your awareness of positive self-care strategies for staff, carers and clients, how to promote and maintain emotional wellbeing, and identifying risks to resilience, particularly in relation to workplace stress and “burnout”.

 The course uses a variety of interactive tools to build delegates’ confidence in reducing workplace stressencouraging self-care, and effectively signposting individuals to support.

This course is open to anyone who would like to explore more about self-care in the workplace.

 To book a place click here.

Work related stress, anxiety and depression statistics in Great Britain 2016

The latest estimates from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) show:

  • The total number of cases of work related stress, depression or anxiety in 2015/16 was 488,000 cases, a prevalence rate of 1510 per 100,000 workers. 
  • By occupation, jobs that are common across public service industries (such as healthcare workers; teaching professionals; business, media and public service professionals) show higher levels of stress as compared to all jobs.
  • The main work factors cited by respondents as causing work related stress, depression or anxiety (LFS) were workload pressures, including tight deadlines and too much responsibility and a lack of managerial support

Start Living….

1. START TO PUT YOURSELF FIRST

2. START TO PRIORITISE TASKS

3. START TO MAKE TIME TO RELAX & MENATLLY UNWIND

4. START TO EMPATHISE WITH OTHERS

5. START TO LIVE LIFE TOTHE FULL

Stop Stressing….

6. STOP IGNORING YOUR NEEDS

7. STOP GETTING DISTRACTED

8. STOP ALLOWING OTHERS TO MAKE YOU FEEL INFERIOR

9. STOP BEING JUDGMENTAL

10. STOP AVOIDING THE THINGS YOU LEAST WANT TO DO

 

Stop saying yes when you want to say no

We’ve all been there…that moment when you’re asked to do something you don’t want to do or even have the time to do….you want to say no….but before you know it, the word ‘yes’ has already come out your mouth.

Don’t worry, you really aren’t alone in that. We’ve been thinking about why we find it so important to please everyone, to the point where we feel overwhelmed and stressed out. Pleasing others can be self-serving. But I wonder if the benefits to saying yes are outweighed by the negative impact on our mental health.

By agreeing to do things that you don’t want to could mean that you are a people pleaser, which is not a bad trait, but can cause a lot of stress and anxiety. People pleasers think about other people’s needs, worry about what other people want or think before they think about their own needs, or what they want. 

Learning to say “no” is is about setting boundaries. Every time you say “yes” to someone, you say “no” to yourself and your priorities and needs. It is far worse to say “yes” then to feel your anxiety building up. Forget about pleasing people. It is more important to please yourself so that you can stay calm and relaxed.

Practice saying “no”. Say it aloud so you can hear the words in your own voice. Say phrases with “no” in them, such as, “No, I can’t do that.”

Never say yes on the spot. Instead say “I’ll get back to you” after you’ve checked if you actually can do it. Or how about “Let me think about it and ill speak to you tomorrow”.

You do not need to say “yes” just because you are capable of doing something. You should say “yes” only if you considered your time availability, other commitments and what you may need to give up to complete the job.

Put your self-care above anything else by spending your time on things that make you happy and on decisions that you want, rather than on what others want. If you don’t set boundaries to what or whom you will say no to, your health is at stake. If you neglect yourself, you will not be able to help your family or those that care about you.

You don’t even need to apologies for saying no.

Remember that your self-worth does not depend on how much you do for other people.