Self harm and wellbeing training for schools and colleges

Harmless have a substantial history of working with schools, colleges and education establishments to uphold their learning around self harm. Our range of packages can be tailored to meet the needs of staff and students alike.

We offer PSHE packages for students as well as teacher and pastoral staff training.

PSHE Lessons and Student Packages

Rates of self harm amongst young people are high, with estimates of up to a third of 11-19 year olds having engaged with some self harming activity during this time.

Harmless can work with your school to develop workshop based, classroom experiences for students aged 11+. Work with students is a successful way of developing awareness of self harm amongst young people and their peer groups.

For more information, click here or email training@harmless.org.uk

Training for Teaching and Pastoral Staff

Harmless can deliver young people specific packages of training suitable for learning and staff development days, of varied length and intensity.

Harmless is experienced in working with young people, and in supporting the education sector to meet the psychological needs of their students. The National Inquiry into Self-harm among Young People advocates that services engaged with young people, specifically schools and colleges, should consider the roll out of self harm training for their staff.

For more information, click here or email training@harmless.org.uk 

Feedback From Previous Workshops and Training Days:

  • 100% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop developed their understanding of self harm
  • 92% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop developed their understanding of emotional wellbeing
  • 89% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the workshop made them better aware of where they can go to get help
  • 91% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the trainer’s personal experience helped improve their understanding
  • 96% of staff agreed or strongly agreed the training will help them do their job more effectively
  • 99% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that the trainer’s use of personal experience helped their understanding
  • 98% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that they will be able to put into practice the skills/knowledge they have learned on the training
  • 100% of staff agreed or strongly agreed that the training developed their understanding of the relationship between well-being and coping

Self Harm and Suicide Prevention Work in Nottingham Colleges

As part of the ongoing efforts of the Tomorrow Project in the community, our representatives introduced our self harm and suicide prevention work at a local Nottingham college where key strategies of prevention, intervention and postvention were discussed.

The format of the Tomorrow Project  is delivered via a flexible programme of:

  • Staff training sessions ,
  • PSHE style workshops ,
  • Informal support
  • Parent information sessions
  • Information stands

The response of college personnel to this work which has been commissioned by the Nottingham CCG was very favourable.

Harmless and the Tomorrow Project  continues to raise awareness of our work of information sharing, challenging stigma of mental health issues, and supporting individuals identified as being at risk of self harm or suicide.

For further information  please refer to the websites:

www.tomorrowproject.org.uk

www.harmless.org.uk

 

 Email:

info@harmless.org.uk

Harmless Team Give Their Thoughts on Recent Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescence Research Day

Recently, representatives from the Harmless team attended the Self-Harm and Suicidal Behaviour in Adolescence Research Day at the University of Bristol. The aim of the day was to showcase research, identify unresolved research questions, foster collaborations and share experiences and gave Harmless a great opportunity to present the work we do on a national scale.

A member of the Harmless Team, Val, said “David Klonskey provided us with some food for thought on ‘Understanding Suicide towards an Ideation to Action.’ Questioning what predicts progression from ideation to suicide. He proposed that with risk factors including mood disorder, a history of self harm, anxiety disorder and loss of relationship, job or financial loss confer a desire. However, when there was a change in other factors such as stressors increasing, having fewer reasons to live and there being less fear, all hasten the transitions from ideation to attempts. Suicidal ideation develops with two necessary conditions such as when pain and hopelessness increases. When a person’s pain becomes greater than their connectedness to others, this can be a prediction to suicide.” 

The day also involved in depth discussion around the treatment of self harm in adolescents, causes and consequences. Our trainer, Satveer, was able to provide an insightful presentation from a service user perspective and promote the positive improvement that Harmless’ clinical interventions have on those who access our service.

Overall, the research day provided vital insight into self harm and suicide in adolescents and positive steps in moving forward and working collaboratively across the country.

 

 

Harmless and Tomorrow Project deliver vital self harm support in schools

Over the past few weeks, one of Harmless and the Tomorrow Project’s counsellors has been working in schools with young people who self harm and have suicidal ideation.

It is of vital importance that we support young people who self harm by providing opportunities to explore their feelings and find alternative strategies to support them dealing with difficult issues such as friendship difficulties, relationship issues, stress and anxiety.

Many young people find it difficult to cope with their feelings and turn to self harm as a way of expressing their distress. By attending sessions with Harmless, it is hoped that young people will learn coping strategies that do not involve self harm such as talking to someone, relaxation or distraction. Self harm is not attention seeking, it is not a mental illness; it is a symptom of internal stress or distress.

Self Harm and Young People Training 20th March

Due to the success of the last Self Harm and Young People training day, Harmless are holding another course on Thursday 20th March.

The training will concentrate on self harm from the perspective of young people and is suitable for anyone who works with young people or who may come in to contact with young people who self harm or at risk of self harm.

The day will cover:

  • What self harm is, and who it effects
  • What causes young people to self harm and some of the myths around self harm
  • What can be done to support and help young people who self harm
  • Managing the impact of self harm as an individual and a workplace
  • Useful interventions for working with young people who self harm and promoting empowerment
  • Managing and assessing risk

The training will be held at the Harmless offices at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service from 9:30am-4pm.

100% of candidates that attended the last training said that the Training developed their understanding of self harm and will enable them to do their jobs more effectively.

Candidates said :

“[This was] excellent training and offered a real practical application to my job.”   

“The training delivered a realistic understanding and perspective. A knowledgeable and interesting session taught by a vibrant and informative teacher.”

For more information and to book a place on our Self Harm and Young People training day, click here.

 

 

Self Harm Training – Thursday 5th December 2013

Our  ‘Introduction to Self Harm and Working with Self Harm’ days provide an opportunity for individuals from a broad range of professional arenas to attend and get a detailed overview of self harm and working with self harm. Although there is some opportunity for delegates to explore the impact upon them in their own professional arenas, the training is non-specific to a particular field.

Our training days cover:

  • What self harm is, and who it effects
  • What causes someone to self harm and some of the myths around self harm
  • What can be done to support and help people who self harm
  • Managing the impact of self harm as an individual and a workplace
  • Useful interventions for working with young people and promoting empowerment
  • Managing and assessing risk

The training is CPD certified and is delivered over the course of a day and will use a range of delivery methods. Price includes a resource/training pack for all participants.

For more information or to book a place, please email training@harmless.org.uk or visit our online store by clicking here 

Self harm training dates for 2013

New dates announced for self harm training to be held in Nottingham.

The first date in 2013 is to be held in January. To book your place click here

The training will develop your understanding of self harm and enhance skills for working with a diverse range of people that self harm.

The training is run by a CPD accredited trainer. For enquiries email us