Changes to upcoming drop-in session

Due to unforeseen circumstances, Harmless have rearranged the upcoming drop in for young persons.

This drop-in was due to take place on Friday 15th July 2016, but has now been rescheduled to take place on:

Wednesday 20th July 2016: 3:30pm – 4:30pm

This session is for young persons aged up to 21 years.

Our sessions are friendly and welcoming. Our approachable staff create a friendly and inviting atmosphere, offering a friendly face and provide information about our services.

You will have the opportunity to meet Val our experienced and qualified therapist and Colin, our experienced and friendly Project Worker.

We provide services for anyone and not just for those who self harm. If you have concerns about someone else such as a family member or a colleague then feel free to join us.

Please feel free to bring along someone who you can trust such as a friend if this makes you feel more at ease.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

In the News: Austerity causing mental health issues for young people.

A quarter of young people referred to mental health service in England including some who had attempted suicide received on help according to a review carried out by the children’s commissioner.

The commissioner obtained data from 48 of England’s 60 child and adolescent mental health service trusts, discovering that 28% of referrals were denied specialist treatment on the grounds that their illness was not serious enough.

Even those with the most serious illnesses who secure treatment faced lengthy delays waiting 110 days.

The post of mental health champion for schools was axed this last month because she warned that austerity was causing mental health issues for young people. Young people explained that the reasons for their anxiety were things like poverty, the prospect of being unemployed, student debt, academic and exam pressures.

To read the full article, please click on the following link:

www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/may/28/nhs-turning-away-children-referred-for-mental-health-help

Harmless will be delivering weekly Creative Therapy Sessions

Harmless are about to begin a 12 week Creative Therapy Group. Included within this is the opportunity to be involved in focus groups (helping steer future service provision). We are asking for your advise and knowledge about how things need to change.

The group will be beginning Wednesday 27th April 16.30-17.30. If you are interested please get in touch ASAP.

The creative therapy group will be for individuals aged between 14 and 18 years, with sessions focusing on expression of emotions, connections and self-esteem.

The aim of the creative therapy is to assist you to find a way of expression that helps you to connect with your emotions.  This will include techniques that can be used for self-expression and personal growth.

If you are interested in joining the group or know someone who might be, please feel free to contact us.

To find out more get in touch with Val by calling 0115 9348445 or by emailing val@harmless.org.uk.

Increasing pressure on children and young people leading to a rise in mental health issues, self harm and suicidal thoughts

In a recent poll carried out by the Association of Teachers and Lectures there has been an increase in young people feeling under more pressure, 55% reported a large rise in pupils with anxiety and stress. There is more academic pressure which results in children as young as six being stressed out about exams and tests. There is excessive testing which has placed that much stress on some young people resulting in a 79% increase in self harm and suicidal thoughts.

Despite government investing £1.4 billion on children’s mental health service in England, some mental health trusts have seen no significant investment in psychiatric services. There are concerns that although the government is determined to improve children’s mental health, there is still a danger that some children will take untreated mental health issues into adulthood.

There is a belief that schools should play a vital role in supporting children’s mental health and build their resilience, but with rising demands, growing complexity and tight budgets getting in the way, some children who need it most may go without support.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please contact us on 0115 9348445 or email info@harmless.org.uk

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in Tomorrow

Harmless will be hosting their next young person drop in session on:

Wednesday 9th December  at 15.30 – 16.30 for those aged up to 21 years.

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, 7 Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

In the News: Depression and self-harm soar among private school pupils

Survey of head teachers finds problems including eating disorders are now at unprecedented levels, with social media and exam stress blamed

Teenage pupils at British private schools are experiencing unprecedented levels of depression, eating disorders and self-harm, according to head teachers, who say longstanding stresses have been amplified by increased pressure over exams and the ever-present anxieties of social media.

The warning comes from the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC), representing 175 leading private schools, which surveyed 65 head teachers on the subject.

The responses found that in some ways, schools appear to have become kinder places, with fewer cases of intolerance such as homophobic bullying, as well as less drug and alcohol misuse. However, they found greatly increased cyberbullying and online threats, and what the HMC called unprecedented levels of self-harm, depression and eating disorders among pupils.

Bernard Trafford, the headmaster of the Royal Grammar school in Newcastle upon Tyne and a former chair of HMC, told the Guardian that exam pressures played some role, with pupils facing higher grade requirements to get into top universities.

But a greater factor, he said, appeared to be the way social media made common teenage anxieties harder to escape, also exaggerating worries over such things as body image.

To read the full article, please visit: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/oct/04/depression-self-harm-eating-disorders-private-school-pupils-headteachers-poll

If you would like more information on the support we can provide, please email info@harmless.org.uk.

Harmless Self Harm Drop in this Wednesday

Harmless will be hosting their next young person drop in session on:

Wednesday  18th November  at 3:30pm – 4:30pm

for young people aged up to 21 years.

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, & Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

Harmless Self Harm Drop-in next Wednesday

Harmless will be hosting their next young person drop in session on:

Wednesday  18th November  at 3:30pm – 4:30pm

for young people aged up to 21 years.

Our trained therapist will be on hand to offer information or advice about any concerns you may have about self harm.

If you have any concerns about someone such as a family member, friend or a colleague, then please feel free to join us, you will be assured of a friendly welcome.

All drop in sessions will take place at the Nottingham Community and Voluntary Service Building, & Mansfield Road, Nottingham, NG1 3FB (Opposite House of Fraser)

If you have trouble finding us please call on 0115 9348445 or email us at info@harmless.org.uk

 

In the News: Stress can cause pupils to self harm, say nearly half of school staff

Nearly two-thirds of education staff believe pressure on teachers and schools to succeed is one of the main causes of student stress, resulting in self harm, drug abuse and eating disorders.

New research from teaching union the ATL shows that 65 per cent of respondents think pupils are stressed out owing to testing and exams; 48 per cent think pupils suffer from stress because of an overcrowded curriculum and 21 per cent think the cause is the volume of homework.

Sixty-one per cent of respondents believe the pressure on teachers and schools to do well cascades down to pupils, while almost a quarter (22 per cent) think students are worried about getting into the best school or university.

One primary teacher from Oxford, who took part in the survey, said: “Pupils are picking up on teachers’ stress owing to inspections and lack of choice of how and what to teach.”

The survey reveals that many education professionals believe rising stress levels are leading to self harm, attempted suicides and eating disorders among students.

Forty-four per cent of education staff think young people self harm as a direct result of pressure, while 31 per cent believe pressure results in eating disorders and 12 per cent think it can cause attempted suicide.

Thirty-four per cent of respondents think students skive off as a result of pressure and stress, while 21 per cent say students take recreational drugs to alleviate the pressure.

Almost two-thirds (64 per cent) say pupils in their school are under more pressure and stress than two years ago.

A secondary teacher from Cambridge said: “These issues were still prevalent 10 years ago, but now, I think, we are better at identifying them. Sadly, there is still not enough funding to do much. Students can sometimes wait months for an initial assessment, even when suicidal.”

The survey of 1,250 ATL members working in primary and secondary schools, academies and sixth-forms was carried out in August and September this year.

Speaking ahead of ATL’s fringe event on pupil wellbeing at the Labour Party conference, Dr Mary Bousted, the union’s general secretary, said: “It is shocking that so many young people are under so much stress that they self harm. It is also alarming that much of the pressure and stress is caused by the education system and this needs to be a wake-up call to policymakers.”

To read the full article, please visit: https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/stress-can-cause-pupils-self-harm-say-nearly-half-school-staff

In the News: Depression and Self Harm Soar Among Private School Pupils

Survey of head teachers finds problems including eating disorders are now at unprecedented levels, with social media and exam stress blamed

Teenage pupils at British private schools are experiencing unprecedented levels of depression, eating disorders and self-harm, according to headteachers, who say longstanding stresses have been amplified by increased pressure over exams and the ever-present anxieties of social media.

The warning comes from the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference(HMC), representing 175 leading private schools, which surveyed 65 headteachers on the subject.

The responses found that in some ways, schools appear to have become kinder places, with fewer cases of intolerance such as homophobic bullying, as well as less drug and alcohol misuse. However, they found greatly increased cyberbullying and online threats, and what the HMC called unprecedented levels of self-harm, depression and eating disorders among pupils.

Bernard Trafford, the headmaster of the Royal Grammar school in Newcastle upon Tyne and a former chair of HMC, told the Guardian that exam pressures played some role, with pupils facing higher grade requirements to get into top universities.

But a greater factor, he said, appeared to be the way social media made common teenage anxieties harder to escape, also exaggerating worries over such things as body image.

“It is the pressure to excel, and also to be beautiful, all that stuff. And friendship issues seem to be more difficult than ever. In the old days, you got home from school, or in the boarding sector got back to your boarding house, and you got away from it to some extent.

 

To read the full article, please visit:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/oct/04/depression-self-harm-eating-disorders-private-school-pupils-headteachers-poll?CMP=twt_gu